hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
B. Anderson 31 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Cook 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Openshaw 20 0 Browse Search
Alabama (Alabama, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 16 0 Browse Search
CHADWICK 12 8 Browse Search
Fernando Wood 12 0 Browse Search
George Toppan 11 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,056 total hits in 609 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
. Mayor Wood's Recommendation--Senator Benjamin's late speech — War news from Charleston--Hon. Humphrey Marshall--movement of U. S. Troops--volunteering in South Carolina, &c., &c. the Republican papers are attempting to impugn the commercial honesty of the South. The figures, however, lay their arguments out. The following table, compiled from the circulars of the mercantile agency of Dun Boyd & Co., shows the number of failures in the free and slave States respectively in 1860. Free States.Slave States. Whole number of stores in 1860$162,832$66,990 Whole number of failures in 18602,633943 Liabilities of failed stores61,801,97415,103,271 Failed from lack of mercantile knowledgeIMLS_Dictionary.dic and capacity, fires without insurance, bad debts, trusting out, &c665204 Liabilities of foregoing12,047,7482,630,300 Failed from dissipation, extravagance, gambling, inattention to business, &c.21682 Liabilities of foregoing4,233,2311,282,500 Failed from s
The National crisis. Mayor Wood's Recommendation--Senator Benjamin's late speech — War news from Charleston--Hon. Humphrey Marshall--movement of U. S. Troops--volunteering in South Carolina, &c., &c. the Republican papers are attempting to impugn the commercial honesty of the South. The figures, however, lay teal of the laws to which I have referred, and a consequent restoration of our corporate rights. Fernando Wood, Mayor. January 6, 1861. The speech of Senator Benjamin. A Washington letter to the Philadelphia Bulletin, describing the manner of Senator Benjamin, in delivering his great speech, last week, says: He sSenator Benjamin, in delivering his great speech, last week, says: He summed up his argument very calmly, read from a written paper, in a measured, legal tone, the causes of differences, and then concluded. This conclusion fell like a telling shot. He spoke coolly of the approaching dissolution of the Union, and the contest that might ensue. He enumerated the horrors of civil war; alluded to the p
een.--After arriving on the field, the Governor's orders were read by Major Wood. Brigadier General Wallace then addressed the regiment, expressing his high gratification at the large turn-out. He spoke some time upon the existing state of affairs, but said that it required no urging upon the men before him to respond to the call of the Governor. At the close of his remarks he claimed the privilege of being enrolled as the first volunteer. He was followed by Col. Lorick, Maj. Wood and Adjutant Peck, who also enrolled their names. The order was given for volunteers to march four paces to the front, and was responded to most handsomely. Capt. Casson promptly tendered his command of 120 men to the Colonel, and was accepted as the company from the Volunteer Battalion. Lieut. Brennan, commanding the Emmet Guards, whose whole command had also marched to the front, in some appropriate remarks, tendered his corps. The Richland Guards, Capt. E. F. Bookter, numbering 100 rifles, also
e magazines is also understood to the amply supplied with all the munitions necessary for its greatest efficiency. Horrible death from hydrophobia. George Toppan, Jr., a merchant of Boston, died on Sunday morning last, of hydrophobia. The Traveller gives the following account of the case: About three months ago, he was in at the office of Whittier's wharf, when he was bitten by a pet dog — quite a small one. The dog was on the top of a safe, close to the desk, and one of Mr. Whittier's children had been caressing it but a moment before. While conversing with his friend, in reference to a paper laying on his desk, Mr. Toppan laid his hand on the safe or table and leaned over to look closer at the paper, when the little animal sprang up suddenly and bit him in the upper lip. Two physicians were consulted at the time, and though only an impression had been made on the outer skin, yet an examination revealed a puncture from the dog's tooth in the inner surface of the lip
John Letcher (search for this): article 1
war. They left here in the 4 o'clock. Western train, and during their brief stay in the Monumental City were visited by a number of our military. Balt. American. Garrisoning Fort Washington. The Alexandria Gazette, of Monday says much excitement was created in that city on Saturday night, from the Government ordering a garrison to Fort Washington, a few miles below Alexandria, which for several years has been unoccupied. Col. Stuart, of the 175th regiment, immediately informed Gov. Letcher that a body of Federal troops had passed through the jurisdiction of Virginia, for the purpose indicated. Fort Washington is a bastioned work, inaccessible to escalade in the rear, and protected from assault in front by a ditch, which is commanded in all its parts by flank fires of grape and cannister. The greater part, if not all, of its armament is understood to be at the work, and most of it is in position, ready for service, and the magazines is also understood to the amply supp
g for service: In conformity to orders from headquarters of the Commander-in-Chief, the 23d Regiment paraded on Saturday, for the purpose of raising three volunteer companies--one from the Independent Volunteer Battalion, and one each from the upper and lower battalions of the regiment. It speaks well for the patriotism of the District that this regimental parade was one of the largest we have seen.--After arriving on the field, the Governor's orders were read by Major Wood. Brigadier General Wallace then addressed the regiment, expressing his high gratification at the large turn-out. He spoke some time upon the existing state of affairs, but said that it required no urging upon the men before him to respond to the call of the Governor. At the close of his remarks he claimed the privilege of being enrolled as the first volunteer. He was followed by Col. Lorick, Maj. Wood and Adjutant Peck, who also enrolled their names. The order was given for volunteers to march four
The National crisis. Mayor Wood's Recommendation--Senator Benjamin's late speech — War news from Charleston--Hon. Humphrey Marshall--movement of U. S. Troops--volunteering in South Carolina, &c., &c. the Republican papers are attempting to impugn the commercial honesty of the South. The figures, however, lay their arguments out. The following table, compiled from the circulars of the mercantile agency of Dun Boyd & Co., shows the number of failures in the free and slave States respectively in 1860. Free States.Slave States. Whole number of stores in 1860$162,832$66,990 Whole number of failures in 18602,633943 Liabilities of failed stores61,801,97415,103,271 Failed from lack of mercantile knowledgeIMLS_Dictionary.dic and capacity, fires without insurance, bad debts, trusting out, &c665204 Liabilities of foregoing12,047,7482,630,300 Failed from dissipation, extravagance, gambling, inattention to business, &c.21682 Liabilities of foregoing4,233,2311,2
in uncontrollable applause. The Florida forts taken. The following is an extract from a letter, dated Fernandina, Florida, Jan. 5th: "An order came from the Governor this afternoon at three o'clock, and the Everglade will leave here at midnight for St. Augustine, to have the fort there taken, and to bring us some guns and small arms. "The messenger from the Government reports that the Ordinance of Secession will be ready to be read and passed in Convention on Monday, the 7th inst. Our people here and elsewhere in the State are ripe for secession. The good faith with which the people of South Carolina have acted, and the perfidious act of the Federal authorities, has given additional strength to Florida to fight and win her battles." The Charleston Mercury since learned that a detachment of the Fernandina Volunteers has executed promptly the order of Governor Perry. "blue lights" in South Carolina. The Charleston Courier, of Monday, has the following p
Humphrey Marshall (search for this): article 1
The National crisis. Mayor Wood's Recommendation--Senator Benjamin's late speech — War news from Charleston--Hon. Humphrey Marshall--movement of U. S. Troops--volunteering in South Carolina, &c., &c. the Republican papers are attempting to impugn the commercial honesty of the South. The figures, however, lay ton, must be false, as there were not three hundred marines in barracks from New York to Maine. The statement was wholly discredited at that office. Hon. Humphrey Marshall on the crisis. Hon. Humphrey Marshall, of Ky., has written a letter, taking the ground of "fighting in the Union." He concludes thus: I am willinHon. Humphrey Marshall, of Ky., has written a letter, taking the ground of "fighting in the Union." He concludes thus: I am willing to afford all reasonable time to the people of the free States to reconsider, to counsel together, to determine finally, and to act. I would prefer that Kentucky would arm, if need be, until her sons present their whole body in a vast military array; until her hills upon the frontiers are crowned with an unbroken line of entrenc
done her duty nobly. With a voting population of about one thousand five hundred, she has this day on duty, and waiting orders, not less than one thousand men. What district will beat her. Hoisting the United States flag at FortSumter. One of the men who recently returned from Fort Sumter details an incident that took place there on Major Anderson taking possession. It is known that the American flag, brought away from Fort Moultrie, was raised at Sumter precisely at noon on the 27th ult., but the incidents of that "flag raising" have not been related. A short time before noon Major Anderson assembled the whole of his little force, with the workmen employed on the fort, around the foot of the flag-staff. The national ensign was attached to the cord, and Major Anderson holding the end of the lines in his hands, knelt reverently down. The officers, soldiers and men clustered around, many of them on their knees, all deeply impressed with the solemnity of the scene. The cha
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...