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onry, and mounts 49 guns, and in time of war requires a garrison of 250 men.--armament of the work is fully mounted, and its magazines are in good order. In the rear of the fort is a redoubt, which is auxiliary to Fort Barrancas. Some extensive repairs, have recently been completed on this redoubt, and the flanking howitzers of scarp and counter-scarp can be mounted with very little labor. The North Carolina forts. Fort Macon protects Beaufort, N. C., and is situated on a bluff on Bogue's bank, one and three-fourths mile from the city. It commands the entrance to Beaufort harbor, having full sweep of fire on the main channel. The opposite entrance to the harbor is Shacklefords bank, one and a half miles across. The fortification is of hexagonal form, has two tiers of guns, one in casemated bomb proofs and the other en barbette. Its armament consists of twenty thirty-two-pounders, thirty-two twenty-four-pounders, two eighteen-pounders, two twelve-pounders, three field-pie
December 9th, 1860 AD (search for this): article 1
Charleston, previously to the action of the Convention, and we hope and believe not until an offer has been made through an accredited representative, to negotiate for an amicable arrangement of all matters between the State and the Federal Government, provided that no reinforcements shall be sent into those forts, and their relative military status shall remain as at present. John McQueen, Wm. Porcher Miles, M. L. Bonman, W. W. Boyce. Lawrence M. Keitt. Washington, 9th December, 1860. The President did not like the word "provided," because it looked as if we were binding him while avowing that we had no authority to commit the Convention. We told him we did not so understand it. We were expressing our convictions and belief, predicated upon the maintenance of a certain condition of things, which maintenance was absolutely and entirely in his power. If he maintained such condition, then we believed that collision would be avoided until the attempt at a peace
s6 Brass flank howitzers26 Heavy eight inch howitzers13 Thirteen-inch mortar1 Heavy ten-inch mortars4 Light eight-inch mortars4 Sixteen inch stone mortars4 Coehorn mortars5 Total armament210 The fire from this work completely covers the navy-yard, and in case the latter is held by the Federal authorities, it would not ing defence, twelve flank howitzers, eight eight-inch howitzers (heavy,) eight eight-inch howitzers (light,) one thirteen-inch mortar, three ten-inch mortars, two Coehorn mortars. Total, eighty-seven guns. The war garrison of the fort is three hundred men. This fort, however, is sadly in need of repairs; the masonry requires poinfour 18-pounders, four 12 pounders, three field-pieces for flanking defences, six flank howitzers, six eight-inch howitzers, (heavy,) two ten-inch mortars and two Coehorn mortars — in all eighty-seven guns. The work is surrounded by ditches and advanced works, and is in every particular a first-class work. It cost the Federal Gov
W. W. Boyce (search for this): article 1
attack or molest the United States forts in the harbor of Charleston, previously to the action of the Convention, and we hope and believe not until an offer has been made through an accredited representative, to negotiate for an amicable arrangement of all matters between the State and the Federal Government, provided that no reinforcements shall be sent into those forts, and their relative military status shall remain as at present. John McQueen, Wm. Porcher Miles, M. L. Bonman, W. W. Boyce. Lawrence M. Keitt. Washington, 9th December, 1860. The President did not like the word "provided," because it looked as if we were binding him while avowing that we had no authority to commit the Convention. We told him we did not so understand it. We were expressing our convictions and belief, predicated upon the maintenance of a certain condition of things, which maintenance was absolutely and entirely in his power. If he maintained such condition, then we believed th
Theodore Talbot (search for this): article 1
flow from such a beginning, we hold it to be the highest duty of each party most scrupulously to avoid any and every occasion of outbreak or collision. Lieutenant Talbot. Lieut. Theodore Talbot, who was commissioned by Major Robert Anderson, of Fort Sumter, with dispatches for instructions from the General Government, pasLieut. Theodore Talbot, who was commissioned by Major Robert Anderson, of Fort Sumter, with dispatches for instructions from the General Government, passed through this city yesterday morning on route for Washington. He was in undress uniform, wore a foraging cap with glazed cover, and having on a citizen's overcoat, did not appear very much like a soldier. He is a man of small stature, resembling, in point of size, Maj. Wm. Gilham, of the Virginia Military Institute. His compnotes, which he displayed in the office of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Company when hunting up some Virginia funds, with which to pay for his ticket. Lieut. Talbot is a native of the District of Columbia, but was appointed from Kentucky, in May, 1847, to the post of Second Lieutenant First Regiment U. S. Artillery.--He is
J. B. Davis (search for this): article 1
mbers of this company took the first honor in the South Carolina College. The company is made up of the best material. Their uniform is a red frock and dark pants. The following is a list of their officers: Captain, J. M. Perrin; First Lieutenant, A. M. Smith; Second Lieutenant, J. G. Edwards; Third Lieutenant, A. J. Lithgoe. The Monticello Volunteers, from Fairfield District, also passed down yesterday. It is also a strong body of fine looking men, and officered as follows: Captain, J. B. Davis; Lieutenants, J. T. Dawkins, W. J. Dawkins, R. J. Kelly. In Newberry, in the 28th regiment, on Saturday, the two companies were made up; in one of the battalions not 20 men were left when the call was made. In Clarendon, on Saturday, the call for volunteers was responded to by one company of 88, and one of 80, promptly marching out from the body of the regiment. Dr. A. M. Lynah, of the United States Navy, has resigned his commission, and returned to his native State.
January 12th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
etween these gentlemen, telegrams were sent to Washington for further instructions, and until they are received, the Star of the West will remain where she now is with the troops on board, and no communication will be permitted except to Government officers, between her and the shore. The troops, two hundred in number, are in excellent health and spirits. Statement of Capt. McGowan. The following is an official account of the trip: Steam ship Star of the West. New York, Jan. 12th, 1861. M. O. Roberts, Esq--Sir: After leaving the wharf on the 5th inst., at 5 P. M., we proceeded down the bay, where we have to and took on board four officers and two hundred soldiers, with their arms, ammunition, &c, and then proceeded to sea, crossing the bar at Sandy Hook at 9 P. M.--Nothing unusual took place during the passage, which was a pleasant one for the season of the year. We arrived off Charleston bar at 1.30 A. M. on the 9th inst. but could find no guiding marks for
A. M. Smith (search for this): article 1
mpany of Minute Men from Abbeville District arrived in this city on Wednesday night. They number one hundred men, and are as fine a looking body as any that can be raised. For the information of the Tribune and papers of that ilk, we state that ten members of this company took the first honor in the South Carolina College. The company is made up of the best material. Their uniform is a red frock and dark pants. The following is a list of their officers: Captain, J. M. Perrin; First Lieutenant, A. M. Smith; Second Lieutenant, J. G. Edwards; Third Lieutenant, A. J. Lithgoe. The Monticello Volunteers, from Fairfield District, also passed down yesterday. It is also a strong body of fine looking men, and officered as follows: Captain, J. B. Davis; Lieutenants, J. T. Dawkins, W. J. Dawkins, R. J. Kelly. In Newberry, in the 28th regiment, on Saturday, the two companies were made up; in one of the battalions not 20 men were left when the call was made. In Clarendon, on Sa
M. O. Roberts (search for this): article 1
ward of her wheel-house.--Many persons were anxious to gratify their curiosity by going aboard of her in small boats, but this was sternly refused by the officers of the vessel. Capt. McGowan came ashore and repaired at once to the office of M. O. Roberts, the owner of the boat. After a consultation between these gentlemen, telegrams were sent to Washington for further instructions, and until they are received, the Star of the West will remain where she now is with the troops on board, and nor and the shore. The troops, two hundred in number, are in excellent health and spirits. Statement of Capt. McGowan. The following is an official account of the trip: Steam ship Star of the West. New York, Jan. 12th, 1861. M. O. Roberts, Esq--Sir: After leaving the wharf on the 5th inst., at 5 P. M., we proceeded down the bay, where we have to and took on board four officers and two hundred soldiers, with their arms, ammunition, &c, and then proceeded to sea, crossing the
J. M. Perrin (search for this): article 1
owing items: A company of Minute Men from Abbeville District arrived in this city on Wednesday night. They number one hundred men, and are as fine a looking body as any that can be raised. For the information of the Tribune and papers of that ilk, we state that ten members of this company took the first honor in the South Carolina College. The company is made up of the best material. Their uniform is a red frock and dark pants. The following is a list of their officers: Captain, J. M. Perrin; First Lieutenant, A. M. Smith; Second Lieutenant, J. G. Edwards; Third Lieutenant, A. J. Lithgoe. The Monticello Volunteers, from Fairfield District, also passed down yesterday. It is also a strong body of fine looking men, and officered as follows: Captain, J. B. Davis; Lieutenants, J. T. Dawkins, W. J. Dawkins, R. J. Kelly. In Newberry, in the 28th regiment, on Saturday, the two companies were made up; in one of the battalions not 20 men were left when the call was made.
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