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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 1
st be done, or disunion is inevitable. The North has as much interest in the South, in the welfare and prosperity of the South, as our Southern brethren. The Constitution demands that fugitive slaves be returned.--Common honesty requires that they should have full and equal rights in all the Territories. The future condition of the Territories. so far as the extension of slavery is concerned, will be ultimately determined, natural laws, climate, soil, productions, &c. The election of Mr. Lincoln has caused the South to believe there is no longer any safety for them or their property in the Union nor the slaveholding States. There can only be permanent peace between the sections when the free States are ready to stop the discussion of the abstract question of morals connected with this subject, and look upon it only as a political question. What is most needed is the restoration of kindly feeling. Then we may hope an honest and faithful discharge of all the constitutional oblig
John McQueen (search for this): article 1
ny body of the people of South Carolina, will either attack or molest the United States forts in the harbor of Charleston, previously to the action of the Convention, and we hope and believe not until an offer has been made through an accredited representative, to negotiate for an amicable arrangement of all matters between the State and the Federal Government, provided that no reinforcements shall be sent into those forts, and their relative military status shall remain as at present. John McQueen, Wm. Porcher Miles, M. L. Bonman, W. W. Boyce. Lawrence M. Keitt. Washington, 9th December, 1860. The President did not like the word "provided," because it looked as if we were binding him while avowing that we had no authority to commit the Convention. We told him we did not so understand it. We were expressing our convictions and belief, predicated upon the maintenance of a certain condition of things, which maintenance was absolutely and entirely in his power.
William Porcher Miles (search for this): article 1
ple of South Carolina, will either attack or molest the United States forts in the harbor of Charleston, previously to the action of the Convention, and we hope and believe not until an offer has been made through an accredited representative, to negotiate for an amicable arrangement of all matters between the State and the Federal Government, provided that no reinforcements shall be sent into those forts, and their relative military status shall remain as at present. John McQueen, Wm. Porcher Miles, M. L. Bonman, W. W. Boyce. Lawrence M. Keitt. Washington, 9th December, 1860. The President did not like the word "provided," because it looked as if we were binding him while avowing that we had no authority to commit the Convention. We told him we did not so understand it. We were expressing our convictions and belief, predicated upon the maintenance of a certain condition of things, which maintenance was absolutely and entirely in his power. If he maintained s
ore the Convention an interesting statement of their interviews with the President. We make the following extract: On Saturday, the 8th of December, several of the South Carolina delegation, including ourselves, waited upon the President. At this time, there was a growing belief that reinforcements were on the eve of being sent to the forts in Charleston harbor. It was known that the subject was frequently and earnestly discussed in the Cabinet. It was rumored that General Cass and Mr. Holt were urgent that reinforcements should be sent. Upon our being announced, the President, who was then in Cabinet Council, came out to us in the ante-room. We at once entered into a conversation upon the topic, which was so closely occupying his thoughts as well as ours.--The President seemed much disturbed and moved. He told us that he had had a painful interview with the wife of Major Anderson, who had come on from New York to see him. She had manifested great anxiety and distress at th
s, ammunition, &c, and then proceeded to sea, crossing the bar at Sandy Hook at 9 P. M.--Nothing unusual took place during the passage, which was a pleasant one for the season of the year. We arrived off Charleston bar at 1.30 A. M. on the 9th inst. but could find no guiding marks for the bar, as the lights were all out. We proceeded with caution, running very slow and sounding until about 4 A. M., being then in 4½ fathoms of water, when we discovered a light through the haze which at thatballs came within about four feet of the rudder. The ball that hit the vessel was a ricochet shot. It left a dent about three inches deep on the thick oaken planks. The officers of the ship furnish the following report: On Wednesday, 9th inst., at 1 A. M., made Charleston Bar; laid to until daylight, when she proceeded to enter the harbor. When off Morris' Island, was fired into by the battery from that point, seventeen shots being fired at her--one taking slight effect on her
December 8th (search for this): article 1
is generation, which saved the Union from such sudden and unlooked for dangers, surpassed in magnanimity even that one which laid its foundations in the eternal principles of liberty, justice and humanity. The Personal interviews of the South Carolina Commissioners with the President. The South Carolina Commissioners to Washington have laid before the Convention an interesting statement of their interviews with the President. We make the following extract: On Saturday, the 8th of December, several of the South Carolina delegation, including ourselves, waited upon the President. At this time, there was a growing belief that reinforcements were on the eve of being sent to the forts in Charleston harbor. It was known that the subject was frequently and earnestly discussed in the Cabinet. It was rumored that General Cass and Mr. Holt were urgent that reinforcements should be sent. Upon our being announced, the President, who was then in Cabinet Council, came out to us in
Jefferson (search for this): article 1
truction of two Pacific railways, one of which shall connect the ports around the mouth of the Mississippi, and the other the towns on the Missouri and the lakes, with the harbors on our Western coast. If, on the expression of these views, I have not proposed what is desired or expected by many others, they will do me the justice to believe that I am as far from having suggested what in many respects would have been in harmony with cherished convictions of my own. I learned early from Jefferson, that in political affairs we cannot always do what seems to us absolutely best. Those with whom we must necessarily act, entertaining different views, have the power and right of carrying them into practice. We must be content to lead when we can, and to follow when we cannot lead; and if we cannot at any time do for our country all the good that we would wish, we must be satisfied with doing for her all the good that we can. Having submitted my own opinions on this great crisis, i
it ought to be expected that it will, at least as often as once in a century, require some modification to adapt it to the changes of society and alterations of empire. Fourthly, I hold myself ready now, as always heretofore, to vote for any properly guarded laws which shall be deemed necessary to prevent mutual invasions of States by citizens of other States, and punish those who shall aid and abet them. Fifthly, Notwithstanding the arguments of the gallant Senator from Oregon, (Gen. Lane,) I remain of the opinion that physical bonds, such as high ways, railroads, rivers and canals, are vastly more powerful for holding civil communities together than any mere covenants, though written on parchment or engraved upon iron. I remain, therefore, constant to my purpose to secure, if possible, the construction of two Pacific railways, one of which shall connect the ports around the mouth of the Mississippi, and the other the towns on the Missouri and the lakes, with the harbors o
ort Pickens. This fort is a first class bastioned fort, built of New York granite, and situated on low ground on the east point of Santa Rosa Island. Its walls are forty-five feet in height by twelve feet in thickness; it is embrasure for two tiers of guns, which are placed under bombproof casemates, besides having one tier of guns en barbette. The guns from this work radiate to every point of the horizon, with flank and enfilading fire at every angle of approach. The work was commenced in 1828 and finished in 1853. It cost the Federal Government nearly one million of dollars. When on a war footing its garrison consists of 1,260 soldiers. Its armament, only a portion of which is within its walls, consists of-- Guns. Forty-two pounder iron guns63 Thirty-two-pounder iron guns17 Twenty-four-pounder iron guns49 Eighteen pounder iron guns5 Twelve pounder iron guns13 Brass field pieces6 Brass flank howitzers26 Heavy eight inch howitzers13 Thirteen-inch mortar1 Heavy
n have laid before the Convention an interesting statement of their interviews with the President. We make the following extract: On Saturday, the 8th of December, several of the South Carolina delegation, including ourselves, waited upon the President. At this time, there was a growing belief that reinforcements were on the eve of being sent to the forts in Charleston harbor. It was known that the subject was frequently and earnestly discussed in the Cabinet. It was rumored that General Cass and Mr. Holt were urgent that reinforcements should be sent. Upon our being announced, the President, who was then in Cabinet Council, came out to us in the ante-room. We at once entered into a conversation upon the topic, which was so closely occupying his thoughts as well as ours.--The President seemed much disturbed and moved. He told us that he had had a painful interview with the wife of Major Anderson, who had come on from New York to see him. She had manifested great anxiety and
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