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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Philip A. Cox (search for this): article 10
Fatal Accident. --On Sunday night week a daughter of Mr. Philip A. Cox, residing near Marion, Arkansas, met with a terrible death. She was sitting before a fire reading a news paper, when a spark from the embers flew into her lap. All unconscious of the fact, she kept on reading until her clothes had ignited almost beyond possibility of being put out, and she ran screaming from the room. Her father met her in the hall covered with flames, and being unable to subdue them, seized his child and threw her over the balcony into the mud, where finally her clothing was extinguished, but not until she had inhaled the deadly flames. She lingered a few hours in terrible agony, when death put an end to her sufferings.--Memphis Avalanche, 7th.
Marion, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 10
Fatal Accident. --On Sunday night week a daughter of Mr. Philip A. Cox, residing near Marion, Arkansas, met with a terrible death. She was sitting before a fire reading a news paper, when a spark from the embers flew into her lap. All unconscious of the fact, she kept on reading until her clothes had ignited almost beyond possibility of being put out, and she ran screaming from the room. Her father met her in the hall covered with flames, and being unable to subdue them, seized his child and threw her over the balcony into the mud, where finally her clothing was extinguished, but not until she had inhaled the deadly flames. She lingered a few hours in terrible agony, when death put an end to her sufferings.--Memphis Avalanche, 7th.