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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 17, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 7 total hits in 3 results.

Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 4
Death of an Old lady. --In Boston, on Thursday afternoon, Miss Mary P. Townsend, a daughter of Dr. Townsend, died at her residence, in Hawkins street, where she was born, and had lived for sixty-five years. She was reputed to be worth $100,000, yet she was never known to mingle in society, or to receive any of her relatives at her house since the death of her sister, who also preferred a single life to a married one. The only attendant which was ever permitted in the house was a woman. Since the death of the doctor the carriage-house has remained closed, with the carriage and harness just as he left them, and no one was allowed to enter it. When Miss Townsend was first taken ill she was advised to consult a physician, but she refused, and continued obdurate to the last. Neither would she allow a single person in her room while sick and dying, excepting her female servant. Like her sister, she is supposed to have left all her wealth for charitable purposes.--Phil. Inq.
Mary P. Townsend (search for this): article 4
Death of an Old lady. --In Boston, on Thursday afternoon, Miss Mary P. Townsend, a daughter of Dr. Townsend, died at her residence, in Hawkins street, where she was born, and had lived for sixty-five years. She was reputed to be worth $100,000, yet she was never known to mingle in society, or to receive any of her relatives aDr. Townsend, died at her residence, in Hawkins street, where she was born, and had lived for sixty-five years. She was reputed to be worth $100,000, yet she was never known to mingle in society, or to receive any of her relatives at her house since the death of her sister, who also preferred a single life to a married one. The only attendant which was ever permitted in the house was a woman. Since the death of the doctor the carriage-house has remained closed, with the carriage and harness just as he left them, and no one was allowed to enter it. When Mis Miss Townsend was first taken ill she was advised to consult a physician, but she refused, and continued obdurate to the last. Neither would she allow a single person in her room while sick and dying, excepting her female servant. Like her sister, she is supposed to have left all her wealth for charitable purposes.--Phil. Inq.
Philip Inq (search for this): article 4
Death of an Old lady. --In Boston, on Thursday afternoon, Miss Mary P. Townsend, a daughter of Dr. Townsend, died at her residence, in Hawkins street, where she was born, and had lived for sixty-five years. She was reputed to be worth $100,000, yet she was never known to mingle in society, or to receive any of her relatives at her house since the death of her sister, who also preferred a single life to a married one. The only attendant which was ever permitted in the house was a woman. Since the death of the doctor the carriage-house has remained closed, with the carriage and harness just as he left them, and no one was allowed to enter it. When Miss Townsend was first taken ill she was advised to consult a physician, but she refused, and continued obdurate to the last. Neither would she allow a single person in her room while sick and dying, excepting her female servant. Like her sister, she is supposed to have left all her wealth for charitable purposes.--Phil. Inq.