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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 3
The first Secessionist. --The first disunion speech ever made in the United States House of Representatives was by Josiah Quincy, of Massachusetts, in regard to the Louisiana enabling act, January 14, 1811. He said: "I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion that if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some to prepare definitely for a separation — amicably if they can, violently if they must.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 3
The first Secessionist. --The first disunion speech ever made in the United States House of Representatives was by Josiah Quincy, of Massachusetts, in regard to the Louisiana enabling act, January 14, 1811. He said: "I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion that if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some to prepare definitely for a separation — amicably if they can, violently if they must.
Josiah Quincy (search for this): article 3
The first Secessionist. --The first disunion speech ever made in the United States House of Representatives was by Josiah Quincy, of Massachusetts, in regard to the Louisiana enabling act, January 14, 1811. He said: "I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion that if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some to prepare definitely for a separation — amicably if they can, violently if they must.
January 14th, 1811 AD (search for this): article 3
The first Secessionist. --The first disunion speech ever made in the United States House of Representatives was by Josiah Quincy, of Massachusetts, in regard to the Louisiana enabling act, January 14, 1811. He said: "I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion that if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some to prepare definitely for a separation — amicably if they can, violently if they must.