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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Robert Anderson (search for this): article 2
thern people against the South. Lincoln and Seward know very well that the right to send a vessel with provisions to Major Anderson involved just the same issue as a reinforcement. Hence it was made in the way that enabled them to get up a story aon," &c. It would be impossible for Seward to do anything openly and above board. The next step was to sacrifice Major Anderson. He must be defeated at all hazards. --Republicans openly said, before the bombardment of Fort Sumter, that they wanted Major Anderson defeated. They wished to arouse the Democrats of the North, and the Tribune, the next day after the fall of Sumter, thus coolly chuckles: "We have lost Fort Sumter, but we have gained a united North. " And some Democrats of human liberty and freedom has never been concocted. Who but a fiend could have thought of sacrificing the gallant Major Anderson and his little band in order to carry out a political game? Yet there he was compelled to stand for thirty-six hours
Crittenden (search for this): article 2
ing for it! Are the people stark mad? Are they crazy? Will they not pause and listen to reason? Let us recur to a few facts. Not long since, a Democratic Convention was held at Albany. It was just after our people had been frightened by "a big scare" gotten up by Judge Smalley. That Convention solemnly pledged the Democracy and Union men of this State to oppose coercion, and demanded that the Republicans should either grant some reasonable compromise to the South, or else that Mr. Crittenden's compromise amendments should be submitted to a vote of the people. If the Republicans failed to do this, that Convention solemnly pledged itself to resist, with all their influence, the coercive policy of Lincoln. Where are these men now? We trust the Convention will at once be called together, and let us see whether these men are now ready to join hands with the Abolitionists in tearing down this Government, or whether they still stand true to their pledges. Are they still rea
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 2
he South, or else that Mr. Crittenden's compromise amendments should be submitted to a vote of the people. If the Republicans failed to do this, that Convention solemnly pledged itself to resist, with all their influence, the coercive policy of Lincoln. Where are these men now? We trust the Convention will at once be called together, and let us see whether these men are now ready to join hands with the Abolitionists in tearing down this Government, or whether they still stand true to thedisguise. We have no doubt, and all the circumstances prove, that it was a cunningly devised scheme, contrived with all due attention to scenic display and intended to arouse, and, if possible, exasperate the Northern people against the South. Lincoln and Seward know very well that the right to send a vessel with provisions to Major Anderson involved just the same issue as a reinforcement. Hence it was made in the way that enabled them to get up a story about "humanity, " "relieving a starv
F. W. Seward (search for this): article 2
We have no doubt, and all the circumstances prove, that it was a cunningly devised scheme, contrived with all due attention to scenic display and intended to arouse, and, if possible, exasperate the Northern people against the South. Lincoln and Seward know very well that the right to send a vessel with provisions to Major Anderson involved just the same issue as a reinforcement. Hence it was made in the way that enabled them to get up a story about "humanity, " "relieving a starving garrison," &c. It would be impossible for Seward to do anything openly and above board. The next step was to sacrifice Major Anderson. He must be defeated at all hazards. --Republicans openly said, before the bombardment of Fort Sumter, that they wanted Major Anderson defeated. They wished to arouse the Democrats of the North, and the Tribune, the next day after the fall of Sumter, thus coolly chuckles: "We have lost Fort Sumter, but we have gained a united North. " And some Democrats ha
e assumes to be its especial guardian. And strange to say, Democrats have been deluded by the arch machinations of these destroyers of our country — these worse than madmen, who talk about preserving the Union by fighting for it! Are the people stark mad? Are they crazy? Will they not pause and listen to reason? Let us recur to a few facts. Not long since, a Democratic Convention was held at Albany. It was just after our people had been frightened by "a big scare" gotten up by Judge Smalley. That Convention solemnly pledged the Democracy and Union men of this State to oppose coercion, and demanded that the Republicans should either grant some reasonable compromise to the South, or else that Mr. Crittenden's compromise amendments should be submitted to a vote of the people. If the Republicans failed to do this, that Convention solemnly pledged itself to resist, with all their influence, the coercive policy of Lincoln. Where are these men now? We trust the Convention