hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 66 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Maria Higgins 21 1 Browse Search
William G. Brown 20 0 Browse Search
June 27th 18 18 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 14 0 Browse Search
George P. Kane 14 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 35 total hits in 17 results.

1 2
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 4
een issued to our own regiments. He understood Virginia had already furnished more armed men than any two of the Confederate States. This resolution proposed, in addition to armed regiments, to turn over to the Confederate States ,000 arms. These had been issued to our own men, and were now in their hands. Turn them over, and they may be at any moment taken from our people and given to regiments from other States deemed more worthy. There was no obligation under our treaty with Mr. Stephens. The other States had not turned over arms and munitions by any uniform terms. North Carolina now had 37,000 arms not turned over. Georgia had not definitely turned over. Let us furnish all the armed regiments we can; but let us keep the arms for our people. Mr. Barbour's amendment was carried.--Ayes 50, noes 21. Mr. J. Barbour then moved that the body go into secret session, which was carried.--After remaining in secret session, the Convention opened its doors and Adjourned.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 4
during the debate. Moved and carried to lay upon the table. It was moved that an ordinance in reference to the election of Members of Congress to the Confederate States be now taken up, and Mr. Bouldin moved to amend. Amendment reported, and on motion carried. It was resolved that the commission of Jno. J. Jackson, asptured at Harper's Ferry. These arms had been issued to our own regiments. He understood Virginia had already furnished more armed men than any two of the Confederate States. This resolution proposed, in addition to armed regiments, to turn over to the Confederate States ,000 arms. These had been issued to our own men, and wereConfederate States ,000 arms. These had been issued to our own men, and were now in their hands. Turn them over, and they may be at any moment taken from our people and given to regiments from other States deemed more worthy. There was no obligation under our treaty with Mr. Stephens. The other States had not turned over arms and munitions by any uniform terms. North Carolina now had 37,000 arms no
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
f Injuries and the recovery of debts, was laid on the table. Mr. James Barbour then stated that there were questions relating to some forty millions of dollars, which we had transferred to the Confederate Government, which should be taken up, so that we may have an equitable settlement after the war. Mr. Alfred M. Barbour, of Jefferson, proposed to strike out the word "arms," in the third line in the first resolution. Mr. B. said that nearly five thousand arms were captured at Harper's Ferry. These arms had been issued to our own regiments. He understood Virginia had already furnished more armed men than any two of the Confederate States. This resolution proposed, in addition to armed regiments, to turn over to the Confederate States ,000 arms. These had been issued to our own men, and were now in their hands. Turn them over, and they may be at any moment taken from our people and given to regiments from other States deemed more worthy. There was no obligation under
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
y licks during the debate. Moved and carried to lay upon the table. It was moved that an ordinance in reference to the election of Members of Congress to the Confederate States be now taken up, and Mr. Bouldin moved to amend. Amendment reported, and on motion carried. It was resolved that the commission of Jno. J. Jackson, as Brigadier General of Virginia, be and the same is hereby annulled. It was moved that unless the Manassas Gap Railroad complete the connection between Strasburg and Winchester, that the Winchester and Potomac Railroad be empowered to do so. Mr. Tredway moved the consideration of an ordinance in relation to disloyal or suspicious persons. An ordinance in regard to traitors and their property was next taken up. It was opposed by Mr. Woods, on the ground of its being too broad. An ordinance involving certain modifications in our laws for the redress of Injuries and the recovery of debts, was laid on the table. Mr. James Barbour th
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 4
been issued to our own regiments. He understood Virginia had already furnished more armed men than any two of the Confederate States. This resolution proposed, in addition to armed regiments, to turn over to the Confederate States ,000 arms. These had been issued to our own men, and were now in their hands. Turn them over, and they may be at any moment taken from our people and given to regiments from other States deemed more worthy. There was no obligation under our treaty with Mr. Stephens. The other States had not turned over arms and munitions by any uniform terms. North Carolina now had 37,000 arms not turned over. Georgia had not definitely turned over. Let us furnish all the armed regiments we can; but let us keep the arms for our people. Mr. Barbour's amendment was carried.--Ayes 50, noes 21. Mr. J. Barbour then moved that the body go into secret session, which was carried.--After remaining in secret session, the Convention opened its doors and Adjourned.
Alfred M. Barbour (search for this): article 4
dollars, which we had transferred to the Confederate Government, which should be taken up, so that we may have an equitable settlement after the war. Mr. Alfred M. Barbour, of Jefferson, proposed to strike out the word "arms," in the third line in the first resolution. Mr. B. said that nearly five thousand arms were captured000 arms not turned over. Georgia had not definitely turned over. Let us furnish all the armed regiments we can; but let us keep the arms for our people. Mr. Barbour's amendment was carried.--Ayes 50, noes 21. Mr. J. Barbour then moved that the body go into secret session, which was carried.--After remaining in secret srned over. Let us furnish all the armed regiments we can; but let us keep the arms for our people. Mr. Barbour's amendment was carried.--Ayes 50, noes 21. Mr. J. Barbour then moved that the body go into secret session, which was carried.--After remaining in secret session, the Convention opened its doors and Adjourned.
lemen who have been appointed by the Governor as aids, shall be paid up to the time that this Convention decides that they are inelligible to their seats as such aids. Moved to lay on the table, ried. The discussion took rather a wide range, Governor Letcher receiving some heavy licks during the debate. Moved and carried to lay upon the table. It was moved that an ordinance in reference to the election of Members of Congress to the Confederate States be now taken up, and Mr. Bouldin moved to amend. Amendment reported, and on motion carried. It was resolved that the commission of Jno. J. Jackson, as Brigadier General of Virginia, be and the same is hereby annulled. It was moved that unless the Manassas Gap Railroad complete the connection between Strasburg and Winchester, that the Winchester and Potomac Railroad be empowered to do so. Mr. Tredway moved the consideration of an ordinance in relation to disloyal or suspicious persons. An ordinance in
solved that the commission of Jno. J. Jackson, as Brigadier General of Virginia, be and the same is hereby annulled. It was moved that unless the Manassas Gap Railroad complete the connection between Strasburg and Winchester, that the Winchester and Potomac Railroad be empowered to do so. Mr. Tredway moved the consideration of an ordinance in relation to disloyal or suspicious persons. An ordinance in regard to traitors and their property was next taken up. It was opposed by Mr. Woods, on the ground of its being too broad. An ordinance involving certain modifications in our laws for the redress of Injuries and the recovery of debts, was laid on the table. Mr. James Barbour then stated that there were questions relating to some forty millions of dollars, which we had transferred to the Confederate Government, which should be taken up, so that we may have an equitable settlement after the war. Mr. Alfred M. Barbour, of Jefferson, proposed to strike out the
motion in reference to the expulsion of Mr. Willey was laid on the table. An ordinance was then submitted in regard to the election of officers of Militia companies and passed. Mr. Speed submitted a resolution providing that those gentlemen who have been appointed by the Governor as aids, shall be paid up to the time that this Convention decides that they are inelligible to their seats as such aids. Moved to lay on the table, ried. The discussion took rather a wide range, Governor Letcher receiving some heavy licks during the debate. Moved and carried to lay upon the table. It was moved that an ordinance in reference to the election of Members of Congress to the Confederate States be now taken up, and Mr. Bouldin moved to amend. Amendment reported, and on motion carried. It was resolved that the commission of Jno. J. Jackson, as Brigadier General of Virginia, be and the same is hereby annulled. It was moved that unless the Manassas Gap Railroad complete
Evening session. At five o'clock the Convention was called to order by the temporary Chairman, Mr. Southall. The motion in reference to the expulsion of Mr. Willey was laid on the table. An ordinance was then submitted in regard to the election of officers of Militia companies and passed. Mr. Speed submitted a resolution providing that those gentlemen who have been appointed by the Governor as aids, shall be paid up to the time that this Convention decides that they are inelligible to their seats as such aids. Moved to lay on the table, ried. The discussion took rather a wide range, Governor Letcher receiving some heavy licks during the debate. Moved and carried to lay upon the table. It was moved that an ordinance in reference to the election of Members of Congress to the Confederate States be now taken up, and Mr. Bouldin moved to amend. Amendment reported, and on motion carried. It was resolved that the commission of Jno. J. Jackson, as Brigadier Gen
1 2