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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 6, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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t further is that he had given notice to the citizens of his intention to fall upon the enemy there, in order that the women and children might escape. This is all that has come to hand. This, as we say, is verbal; but then it is from gentlemen who are highly respectable and who report that it came to Winchester in a very straight and creditable manner. We are all anxiety to be Wallader, or Patterson, whichever he may have been, is nearer reinforcements than Johnston. We see that Stone, with 3,500 men was looked for in the neighborhood of Hartper's Ferry, twenty miles only from Martinsburg, on his way to unite with the Federalists at Martinsburg. A little delay might bring aid to them. But Gen. Johnston is too great a strategist to allow any time to clapse before availing himself to the fullest extent of his advantage. A passenger states that the militia of the region thereabout were assembling and a considerable force of them would likely arrive in good time to join Ge
rson, (or both, as the case may be,) did not recross the Potomac; but followed Johnston's advanced force, under Gen. Jackson, until it effected a junction with the maht enough to be credited, we believe,) at once assailed the entire force under Johnston and were repulsed with severe loss. Thrice did they try to drive him from his position with the like defeat, and the last time Johnston pursued them into Martinsburg, where, having outflanked them he held them at last accounts. The statement lader, or Patterson, whichever he may have been, is nearer reinforcements than Johnston. We see that Stone, with 3,500 men was looked for in the neighborhood of Hartpe Federalists at Martinsburg. A little delay might bring aid to them. But Gen. Johnston is too great a strategist to allow any time to clapse before availing himseg and a considerable force of them would likely arrive in good time to join Gen. Johnston. The reader will be amused with one of the Washington dispatches, publ
Cadwallader (search for this): article 1
The battles of Martinsburg. It turns out that Cadwallader of Patterson, (or both, as the case may be,) did not recross the Potomac; but followed Johnston's advanced force, under Gen. Jackson, until it effected a junction with the main body of the Confederate forces a few miles south of Martinsburg. That town is in Berkeley county, upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, ten or twelve miles from the Potomac, and twenty miles north of Winchester. The Federalist, according to the most reliaereabout were assembling and a considerable force of them would likely arrive in good time to join Gen. Johnston. The reader will be amused with one of the Washington dispatches, published in our columns this morning, of the effect one of Cadwallader's telegrams had on old "Fuss and Feathers." who caused the old Ape to be aroused from his bed to hear the glorious news of the retreat of Jackson! It is exceedingly rich. The whole Cabinet was in the highest spirits upon the following day! H
James W. Jackson (search for this): article 1
The battles of Martinsburg. It turns out that Cadwallader of Patterson, (or both, as the case may be,) did not recross the Potomac; but followed Johnston's advanced force, under Gen. Jackson, until it effected a junction with the main body of the Confederate forces a few miles south of Martinsburg. That town is in Berkeley county, upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, ten or twelve miles from the Potomac, and twenty miles north of Winchester. The Federalist, according to the most reliabd a considerable force of them would likely arrive in good time to join Gen. Johnston. The reader will be amused with one of the Washington dispatches, published in our columns this morning, of the effect one of Cadwallader's telegrams had on old "Fuss and Feathers." who caused the old Ape to be aroused from his bed to hear the glorious news of the retreat of Jackson! It is exceedingly rich. The whole Cabinet was in the highest spirits upon the following day! How are they by this time?
William Patterson (search for this): article 1
The battles of Martinsburg. It turns out that Cadwallader of Patterson, (or both, as the case may be,) did not recross the Potomac; but followed Johnston's advanced force, under Gen. Jackson, until it effected a junction with the main body of the Confederate forces a few miles south of Martinsburg. That town is in Berkeley county, upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, ten or twelve miles from the Potomac, and twenty miles north of Winchester. The Federalist, according to the most relia is all that has come to hand. This, as we say, is verbal; but then it is from gentlemen who are highly respectable and who report that it came to Winchester in a very straight and creditable manner. We are all anxiety to be Wallader, or Patterson, whichever he may have been, is nearer reinforcements than Johnston. We see that Stone, with 3,500 men was looked for in the neighborhood of Hartper's Ferry, twenty miles only from Martinsburg, on his way to unite with the Federalists at Martin
Berkeley County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The battles of Martinsburg. It turns out that Cadwallader of Patterson, (or both, as the case may be,) did not recross the Potomac; but followed Johnston's advanced force, under Gen. Jackson, until it effected a junction with the main body of the Confederate forces a few miles south of Martinsburg. That town is in Berkeley county, upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, ten or twelve miles from the Potomac, and twenty miles north of Winchester. The Federalist, according to the most reliable information we have, (and it comes straight enough to be credited, we believe,) at once assailed the entire force under Johnston and were repulsed with severe loss. Thrice did they try to drive him from his position with the like defeat, and the last time Johnston pursued them into Martinsburg, where, having outflanked them he held them at last accounts. The statement further is that he had given notice to the citizens of his intention to fall upon the enemy there, in order that the women
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The battles of Martinsburg. It turns out that Cadwallader of Patterson, (or both, as the case may be,) did not recross the Potomac; but followed Johnston's advanced force, under Gen. Jackson, until it effected a junction with the main body of the Confederate forces a few miles south of Martinsburg. That town is in Berkeley county, upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, ten or twelve miles rive him from his position with the like defeat, and the last time Johnston pursued them into Martinsburg, where, having outflanked them he held them at last accounts. The statement further is that with 3,500 men was looked for in the neighborhood of Hartper's Ferry, twenty miles only from Martinsburg, on his way to unite with the Federalists at Martinsburg. A little delay might bring aid to Martinsburg. A little delay might bring aid to them. But Gen. Johnston is too great a strategist to allow any time to clapse before availing himself to the fullest extent of his advantage. A passenger states that the militia of the region there
deranged, and while in that condition breaking up a lot of valuable furniture at the American Hotel.--The conduct of the party betrayed such evident signs of a dethronement of reason, that it was found necessary to secure him, when officer Chalkley was sent for and conveyed him to the lock-up. The Mayor said that he could not treat the prisoner as he could other individuals who were sane — that is, commit him till he furnished security for his appearance to answer an indictment by the Grand July for the injury done at the Hotel, but he would retain him in custody till he was ready to leave the city.--He was ready to let him out whenever he was ready to go away. Morris protested he was not deranged on the occasion of smashing up Col. Carrington's furniture, but that he was greatly excited, and was willing to pay all damages. The Mayor said he did not sit to assess damages on injury done to private property; it was for a jury to ascertain that.--He had, however, been informed by a re
Carrington (search for this): article 1
was sent for and conveyed him to the lock-up. The Mayor said that he could not treat the prisoner as he could other individuals who were sane — that is, commit him till he furnished security for his appearance to answer an indictment by the Grand July for the injury done at the Hotel, but he would retain him in custody till he was ready to leave the city.--He was ready to let him out whenever he was ready to go away. Morris protested he was not deranged on the occasion of smashing up Col. Carrington's furniture, but that he was greatly excited, and was willing to pay all damages. The Mayor said he did not sit to assess damages on injury done to private property; it was for a jury to ascertain that.--He had, however, been informed by a reliable citizen, that the prisoner was subject to fits of occasional derangement, when his conduct was very violent. If, however, the prisoner entertained a different opinion, it would be his duty to inquire how far he was to be treated as other sa
Not deranged. --Hugh R. Morris was arraigned before the Mayor for being deranged, and while in that condition breaking up a lot of valuable furniture at the American Hotel.--The conduct of the party betrayed such evident signs of a dethronement of reason, that it was found necessary to secure him, when officer Chalkley was sent for and conveyed him to the lock-up. The Mayor said that he could not treat the prisoner as he could other individuals who were sane — that is, commit him till he furnished security for his appearance to answer an indictment by the Grand July for the injury done at the Hotel, but he would retain him in custody till he was ready to leave the city.--He was ready to let him out whenever he was ready to go away. Morris protested he was not deranged on the occasion of smashing up Col. Carrington's furniture, but that he was greatly excited, and was willing to pay all damages. The Mayor said he did not sit to assess damages on injury done to private property;
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