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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 2
He referred in heart-stirring tones to the shackled condition of Maryland, and proudly asserted his confidence that thirty thousand brave MaMaryland hearts now anxiously throbbed, and but waited the war-tocsin to rush at once to the aid of the sunny South and her noble cause. Every ith stern indignation as the President eloquently poured forth old Maryland's wrongs, and bade each Maryland boy resolve from his inmost soul Maryland boy resolve from his inmost soul to avenge his down-trodden State. Gracefully and eloquently presenting the banner to the Captain of Company "B," with a parting injunction toAccompanying the flag was the following note: "Brave sons of Maryland! With pride and confidence we entrust our flag to you, knowing th when, by their gallant conduct and warrior deeds, they had placed Maryland as a jewel in the coronet of the South.--Each word spoke the soldi of earth. Amid three cheers for the President, the flag, and old Maryland, the audience dispersed. Thus ended an eventful day at Camp Hermi
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 2
ic were his words, and soul-thrilling when he urged the soldiers' duty in the great conflict before us. At the finale of the dress parade, the gallant and soldier-like companies, "F" of Richmond, "B" of Baltimore, and the "Madison Infantry," of Louisiana, marched to the front of the parade-ground and halted. The peat uniforms and tasteful appearance of Company F, the ease and facility with which they performed the intricacies of the manual, proclaimed at once the perfect soldier; while the host of fair friends, who were smiling approval at the almost perfect execution of each command, indicated their prowess in the boudoir and parlor as well as in the camp. The "Madison Infantry," of Louisiana, as fine and effective a corps as could be desired, made a beautiful and imposing appearance. The fine physique of the members, the prompt executions of the evolutions incident to parade, elicited the admiration of all present. The presentation of a stand of colors to the Baltimore comp
Baltimore (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 2
from the solitary and unfinished star, and told his brave young soldiers that theirs was the duty to fill that star with the brilliancy of its sisters, but that it could only be filled when, by their gallant conduct and warrior deeds, they had placed Maryland as a jewel in the coronet of the South.--Each word spoke the soldier — no flowery, hackneyed phrases, but; like the young captain's sword, mettle and to the point. At this stage, the stalwart standard-bearer, Jas. P. Rogers, of Baltimore County, Md., received the flag from the Captain, who bade him treasure it as the apple of his eye, guard it as his sacred honor, and promise from his inmost soul never to let it droop or trail in disgrace. Further, he told them that the outlines should be soon filled in Baltimore, and that the same hands which worked the eloquent star were the ones for the task; but that if the day were gone and the foe victorious, they must fill it with the enemy's blood ere they took their parting look of ear
Sam Davis (search for this): article 2
nned every direction, and those unable from their distance to ascertain the nature of the commotion, were pressing forward to see and learn, when all doubts and surmises were dissipated as some one enthusiastically shouted, "Three cheers for President Davis" Literally surrounded by the dense mass, through which, with difficulty, his prancing steeds forced a passage, our Chief Magistrate was shaking hands and bowing to the eager aspirants for that honor. Now the crowd becomes too dense, and thee evolutions incident to parade, elicited the admiration of all present. The presentation of a stand of colors to the Baltimore company called together the three companies. At the prompt and ready execution of the command of "parade rest," President Davis advanced to the front of company "B," and holding the beautiful banner in his right hand, spoke in eloquent Tereus on behalf of the Baltimore ladies, who thus presented to their representatives here the splendid flag, which he urged them, by
J. Lyle Clark (search for this): article 2
lace in hands that will ever defend and keep it, and hoping ere long to welcome it and you victorious to our State and city. May God protect and prosper you and the cause in which you so nobly go forth" The ladies' names signed are names dear to every Baltimorean, and if the company once more waves its beautiful standard in Baltimore, every passing wind that unruffles each silken fold shall be freighted with the heart-felt prayers of Company "B," In receiving the banner, Captain J. Lyle Clark modestly referred to his novel position in attempting a suitable reply to the eloquent words used by the President. Bluntly and soldierly, he told the brilliant audience he was no speaker — his was the part to couch, in soldier terms, his heart-felt gratitude for the cherished token of Baltimore regard; then, after a few pertinent remarks as to the care which would be taken of the flag, he pointed to the star in outline, feelingly and beautifully depicted the silent eloquence from t
corps as could be desired, made a beautiful and imposing appearance. The fine physique of the members, the prompt executions of the evolutions incident to parade, elicited the admiration of all present. The presentation of a stand of colors to the Baltimore company called together the three companies. At the prompt and ready execution of the command of "parade rest," President Davis advanced to the front of company "B," and holding the beautiful banner in his right hand, spoke in eloquent Tereus on behalf of the Baltimore ladies, who thus presented to their representatives here the splendid flag, which he urged them, by every, holy tie, to guard and cherish as a sacred and holy trust. He referred in heart-stirring tones to the shackled condition of Maryland, and proudly asserted his confidence that thirty thousand brave Maryland hearts now anxiously throbbed, and but waited the war-tocsin to rush at once to the aid of the sunny South and her noble cause. Every countenance beamed w
James P. Rogers (search for this): article 2
d the silent eloquence from the solitary and unfinished star, and told his brave young soldiers that theirs was the duty to fill that star with the brilliancy of its sisters, but that it could only be filled when, by their gallant conduct and warrior deeds, they had placed Maryland as a jewel in the coronet of the South.--Each word spoke the soldier — no flowery, hackneyed phrases, but; like the young captain's sword, mettle and to the point. At this stage, the stalwart standard-bearer, Jas. P. Rogers, of Baltimore County, Md., received the flag from the Captain, who bade him treasure it as the apple of his eye, guard it as his sacred honor, and promise from his inmost soul never to let it droop or trail in disgrace. Further, he told them that the outlines should be soon filled in Baltimore, and that the same hands which worked the eloquent star were the ones for the task; but that if the day were gone and the foe victorious, they must fill it with the enemy's blood ere they took the
July 4th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 2
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.presentation of a flag. Camp Hermitage, July 4, 1861. On Wednesday evening Camp Hermitage was the theatre of a scene of so pleasing and patriotic an aspect as to be long remembered by all who were fortunate enough to be spectators. On the assembling of the troops for dress parade, and while a battery of beauteous eyes was directed to the stalwart forms of our brave soldiers, a sudden swaying of the crowd of spectators to and fro announced the occurrence of something unusual. Eager eyes scanned every direction, and those unable from their distance to ascertain the nature of the commotion, were pressing forward to see and learn, when all doubts and surmises were dissipated as some one enthusiastically shouted, "Three cheers for President Davis" Literally surrounded by the dense mass, through which, with difficulty, his prancing steeds forced a passage, our Chief Magistrate was shaking hands and bowing to the eager aspirants for that ho