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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 8, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): article 21
d were provided with an abundant supply of provisions, consisting of rice, beef and pork, besides plenty of water. The captain said he had brought the slaves from the Congo River, and had been thirty-five days out. His crew consisted of about seventeen men, composed of Spaniards and Americans. The brig was set fire to on the 9th instant. The slaves had been landed at Anguilla three days before Capt. Eneas saw them, during which period the captain of the slaver had been over to the coast of Cuba and secured the services of a schooner, which took off about 400 of the slaves an hour after Capt. Eneas' arrival. The captain of the slaver detained four or five of Capt. Eneas' crew till the first portion of the slaves had been carried off the bay. They were then suffered to go, and the rest of the slaves were carried to a house at the cast end of Anguilla, created by the Spaniards last year. The Azorian left Anguilla on Wednesday last, and brought with her some of the unburnt materia
Bahama Islands (search for this): article 21
s set fire to on the 9th instant. The slaves had been landed at Anguilla three days before Capt. Eneas saw them, during which period the captain of the slaver had been over to the coast of Cuba and secured the services of a schooner, which took off about 400 of the slaves an hour after Capt. Eneas' arrival. The captain of the slaver detained four or five of Capt. Eneas' crew till the first portion of the slaves had been carried off the bay. They were then suffered to go, and the rest of the slaves were carried to a house at the cast end of Anguilla, created by the Spaniards last year. The Azorian left Anguilla on Wednesday last, and brought with her some of the unburnt materials of the slaver. This is the second instance known to us in which a cargo of slaves has been legally made free by having been landed on one of the Bahama Islands, and, for want of a man-of-war, carried again into bondage. We trust the naval force promised by the Imperial Government may soon arrive.
Congo River (search for this): article 21
wanted Captain Eneas to accompany him there, but on the latter's saying he did not care about going, he replied, "Well, you'll have to go." Capt. Eneas then went, and saw, according to the captain's statement, 001 African's, (Congos,) about one-third of whom were children. They appeared for the most part in good health, and were provided with an abundant supply of provisions, consisting of rice, beef and pork, besides plenty of water. The captain said he had brought the slaves from the Congo River, and had been thirty-five days out. His crew consisted of about seventeen men, composed of Spaniards and Americans. The brig was set fire to on the 9th instant. The slaves had been landed at Anguilla three days before Capt. Eneas saw them, during which period the captain of the slaver had been over to the coast of Cuba and secured the services of a schooner, which took off about 400 of the slaves an hour after Capt. Eneas' arrival. The captain of the slaver detained four or five of Cap
ell, you'll have to go." Capt. Eneas then went, and saw, according to the captain's statement, 001 African's, (Congos,) about one-third of whom were children. They appeared for the most part in good health, and were provided with an abundant supply of provisions, consisting of rice, beef and pork, besides plenty of water. The captain said he had brought the slaves from the Congo River, and had been thirty-five days out. His crew consisted of about seventeen men, composed of Spaniards and Americans. The brig was set fire to on the 9th instant. The slaves had been landed at Anguilla three days before Capt. Eneas saw them, during which period the captain of the slaver had been over to the coast of Cuba and secured the services of a schooner, which took off about 400 of the slaves an hour after Capt. Eneas' arrival. The captain of the slaver detained four or five of Capt. Eneas' crew till the first portion of the slaves had been carried off the bay. They were then suffered to go, and
urnt to the water's edge. They also met a man on the beach, and Capt. Eneas asked him if any Spaniards were turtling on the Island. He replAzorian's crow if they ran. The Capt. of the burnt vessel asked Capt. Eneas whether he was a wrecker, and being answered in the affirmative,d here, and my brig and cargo are on the other side." He wanted Captain Eneas to accompany him there, but on the latter's saying he did not care about going, he replied, "Well, you'll have to go." Capt. Eneas then went, and saw, according to the captain's statement, 001 African's, stant. The slaves had been landed at Anguilla three days before Capt. Eneas saw them, during which period the captain of the slaver had beena schooner, which took off about 400 of the slaves an hour after Capt. Eneas' arrival. The captain of the slaver detained four or five of CaCapt. Eneas' crew till the first portion of the slaves had been carried off the bay. They were then suffered to go, and the rest of the slaves
Another slaver at Anguilla. -- Capt. william Eneas, of the schooner "Azorian," of this port, arrived from Anguilla on Sunday last, and informs us that, on the 10th instant, while he and his crew were searching for turtles' eggs on the North side of the beach, they observed a brig burnt to the water's edge. They also met a man on the beach, and Capt. Eneas asked him if any Spaniards were turtling on the Island. He replied that he did not know. Some of the Azorian's crew then walked towards the South side of the Anguilla, where they observed the crew of the burnt vessel, who, with their captain, came out from the bush towards them. They were all armed, and threatened to shoot the Azorian's crow if they ran. The Capt. of the burnt vessel asked Capt. Eneas whether he was a wrecker, and being answered in the affirmative, said, "I am wrecked here, and my brig and cargo are on the other side." He wanted Captain Eneas to accompany him there, but on the latter's saying he did not c
went, and saw, according to the captain's statement, 001 African's, (Congos,) about one-third of whom were children. They appeared for the most part in good health, and were provided with an abundant supply of provisions, consisting of rice, beef and pork, besides plenty of water. The captain said he had brought the slaves from the Congo River, and had been thirty-five days out. His crew consisted of about seventeen men, composed of Spaniards and Americans. The brig was set fire to on the 9th instant. The slaves had been landed at Anguilla three days before Capt. Eneas saw them, during which period the captain of the slaver had been over to the coast of Cuba and secured the services of a schooner, which took off about 400 of the slaves an hour after Capt. Eneas' arrival. The captain of the slaver detained four or five of Capt. Eneas' crew till the first portion of the slaves had been carried off the bay. They were then suffered to go, and the rest of the slaves were carried to a