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ut into the stream, where they were met in like fashion by a couple of Confederate soldiers. After a due interchange of drinks and compliments, the Confederates jestingly remarked that they had a strong mind to take the Yankees prisoners. The latter replied that they would rather be prisoners than not. They were heartily sick of the war, they said, since it proved to be a war of invasion. They were willing to fight for defence, but they could only be dragged by force of military discipline to go with an invading army into Southern territory. Their time of service would be out on the 10th of July, and, with thousands of others, they would go home with an unalterable determination not to take up arms again in the same cause. This is only soldier's talk, it is true, nor was this meeting of equal pomp and consequence to that of Napoleon and Alexander on a raft; but such testimony tells more in regard to the morale of the enemy's army than the magniloquent bulletins of its Generals.
Alexander (search for this): article 5
t into the stream, where they were met in like fashion by a couple of Confederate soldiers. After a due interchange of drinks and compliments, the Confederates jestingly remarked that they had a strong mind to take the Yankees prisoners. The latter replied that they would rather be prisoners than not. They were heartily sick of the war, they said, since it proved to be a war of invasion. They were willing to fight for defence, but they could only be dragged by force of military discipline to go with an invading army into Southern territory. Their time of service would be out on the 10th of July, and, with thousands of others, they would go home with an unalterable determination not to take up arms again in the same cause. This is only soldier's talk, it is true, nor was this meeting of equal pomp and consequence to that of Napoleon and Alexander on a raft; but such testimony tells more in regard to the morale of the enemy's army than the magniloquent bulletins of its Generals.
October, 7 AD (search for this): article 5
t into the stream, where they were met in like fashion by a couple of Confederate soldiers. After a due interchange of drinks and compliments, the Confederates jestingly remarked that they had a strong mind to take the Yankees prisoners. The latter replied that they would rather be prisoners than not. They were heartily sick of the war, they said, since it proved to be a war of invasion. They were willing to fight for defence, but they could only be dragged by force of military discipline to go with an invading army into Southern territory. Their time of service would be out on the 10th of July, and, with thousands of others, they would go home with an unalterable determination not to take up arms again in the same cause. This is only soldier's talk, it is true, nor was this meeting of equal pomp and consequence to that of Napoleon and Alexander on a raft; but such testimony tells more in regard to the morale of the enemy's army than the magniloquent bulletins of its Generals.