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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 1
The President's Return. President Davis returned to Richmond last evening. An immense concourse of people assembled in front of the Spotswood House, and vociferously called for his appearance. He finally presented himself, and addressed the multitude in glowing and eloquent allusions to the brilliant occurrences of Sunday. He described the brilliant movement of Gen. Johnston from Winchester to Manassas, and with fervid feeling drew a graphic picture of the struggle of the wearied say a tribute to the devotion of the soldiers to the Confederacy. Men, he said, who lay upon their backs, wounded, bleeding and exhausted, when they saw him pass, though they could do nothing else, waved their hats as they lay, and cheered for Jeff. Davis and the South. Where the ranks had been broken and the men were somewhat scattered, when they saw the President of the South in their midst, shouted that they would follow him to the death, and rallied once more for the last and the successfu
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
uent allusions to the brilliant occurrences of Sunday. He described the brilliant movement of Gen. Johnston from Winchester to Manassas, and with fervid feeling drew a graphic picture of the struggle of the wearied soldiers of that gallant command for seven hours with the heavy columns of the enemy. --After paying a most honorable tribute to Gen. Johnston, who seized the colors of a regiment and rallied them to the flag of the Confederacy, he alluded to the glorious manner in which Gen. Beauregard came to the support of his comrade in arms, and at a late hour relieved him of the odds against which he was contending. Each of these two able and consummate commanders, though not imprudently or idly exposing their persons where it was unnecessary, yet, when their presence was demanded, gallantly dashed before the lines, and by their personal courage and example reanimated the ranks whenever they were shaken. The President, in a delicate manner, alluded to his own appearance upon
the Spotswood House, and vociferously called for his appearance. He finally presented himself, and addressed the multitude in glowing and eloquent allusions to the brilliant occurrences of Sunday. He described the brilliant movement of Gen. Johnston from Winchester to Manassas, and with fervid feeling drew a graphic picture of the struggle of the wearied soldiers of that gallant command for seven hours with the heavy columns of the enemy. --After paying a most honorable tribute to Gen. JGen. Johnston, who seized the colors of a regiment and rallied them to the flag of the Confederacy, he alluded to the glorious manner in which Gen. Beauregard came to the support of his comrade in arms, and at a late hour relieved him of the odds against which he was contending. Each of these two able and consummate commanders, though not imprudently or idly exposing their persons where it was unnecessary, yet, when their presence was demanded, gallantly dashed before the lines, and by their persona