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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 27, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,096 total hits in 548 results.

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Abolition organs in that city: Monroe County, July 15, 1861. --Will you allow an humble farmer a short space in your valuable paper to give the public a correct statement of the battle near Florida, Mo., and at Monroe Station, fought on the 9th, 10th and 11th instant? I would not have sent you these lines if you had heard a correct statement of the affair. Seeing your paper, I find you are entirely misinformed. The Federal troops left Monroe Station Tuesday morning, the 9th instant9th instant, to hunt up General Thomas Harris or his camp, which was three miles South of Florida. After crossing the prairie from the station, and a short distance in the woods, they were fired upon by 3 or 4 State troops. No damage done, only to the flag-bearer, who dropped the standard, receiving a shot through the wrist or arm. They continued their march without further trouble to within three miles of Florida, when they were fired on again, at the old Hemdon place, by about thirty State troops, at
The war in Missouri. The following letter from a Missouri farmer to the St. Louis Republican, fully refutes the gross lies sent by telegraph from St. Louis through the Abolition organs in that city: Monroe County, July 15, 1861. --Will you allow an humble farmer a short space in your valuable paper to give the public a correct statement of the battle near Florida, Mo., and at Monroe Station, fought on the 9th, 10th and 11th instant? I would not have sent you these lines if you had heard a correct statement of the affair. Seeing your paper, I find you are entirely misinformed. The Federal troops left Monroe Station Tuesday morning, the 9th instant, to hunt up General Thomas Harris or his camp, which was three miles South of Florida. After crossing the prairie from the station, and a short distance in the woods, they were fired upon by 3 or 4 State troops. No damage done, only to the flag-bearer, who dropped the standard, receiving a shot through the wrist or arm. The
The war in Missouri. The following letter from a Missouri farmer to the St. Louis Republican, fully refutes the gross lies sent by telegraph from St. Louis through the Abolition organs in that city: Monroe County, July 15, 1861. --Will you allow an humble farmer a short space in your valuable paper to give the public a correct statement of the battle near Florida, Mo., and at Monroe Station, fought on the 9th, 10th and 11th instant? I would not have sent you these lines if you had heard a correct statement of the affair. Seeing your paper, I find you are entirely misinformed. The Federal troops left Monroe Station Tuesday morning, the 9th instant, to hunt up General Thomas Harris or his camp, which was three miles South of Florida. After crossing the prairie from the station, and a short distance in the woods, they were fired upon by 3 or 4 State troops. No damage done, only to the flag-bearer, who dropped the standard, receiving a shot through the wrist or arm. The
The New Creek fight. Although we have published accounts of the fight at New Creek Station, or Paddy-town, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the following, from a participant, will be read with interest: A detachment of Col. McDonald's Regiment of Cavalry, composed of most of Capt. Macon Jordan's company, of Page, a few of Capt. Wingfield's, of Rockingham, and Bowen's, of Warren, numbering about one hundred, were ordered on 13th instant from headquarters, at Romney, to proceed to Piedmont, to break up railroad and bridges. This being accomplished, and passing to another point of duty, they entered Paddytown, of New Creek Station, Hampshire county, about daylight on the morning of the 14th. They were told by a tavern-keeper that there were no Federals scout, but advancing a short distance, they found two sentinels, killed one and arrested the other, when, just beyond, a fire was opened upon them from a meadow, where the Federals were concealed in the tall grass. The Pag
Schooner burnt. --The Schr. Martha Ann, Capt. Styron, belonging to Capt. D. R. Brooks, of this place, was taken on the 13th instant near Lockwood's Folly, a few miles south of Smithville while becalmed, by one of Lincoln's war vessels and burnt. The Capt. and crew made their escape to the shore in the boat.--Washington (N. C.) Dispatch.
Robert J. Walker's Predictions. --Robert J. Walker is here, stopping with Professor Bache, Chief of Coast Survey. Mr. Walker holds frequent interviews with the Secretary of War, and is undoubtedly volunteering his valuable advice in regard to the necessary movements of the Government to put down the rebellion. Mr. Walker predicted the present state of affairs in his letter to Mr. Buchanan, in the winter of 1857-'58.--Cor. New York Herald, 15th inst.,
aid our troops met with a severe reverse. Capt. Campbell reports that they fought gallantly, and did not retire until their ammunition was completely exhausted. A rebel's statement. Captain W. O. Roseberry, who, it will be remembered, was arrested at Point Pleasant, Va., and taken to Columbus, Ohio, but subsequently released, being charged with sympathy with the rebels, was also among the passengers by the steamer Dunlefth. The following is his version of the conflict: On the 17th, Gen. Cox ordered the 12th Ohio, Col. Lowe, two companies of the 21st Ohio, together with the Cleveland Artillery and Capt. Rogers' Cavalry company from Ironton, Ohio, to cross the Kanawha river at the mouth of Pokey Creek, twenty miles below Charleston, and reconnoitre the rebel camp five miles above, on the South side or right hand bank of the Kanawha, three miles below the mouth of Coal river, and to cannonade and to draw them out, in order to estimate their force, and, if easily captured,
Patterson's headquarters. --The Charlestown (Va.) correspondent of the New York Herald wrote, on the 17th, the following about the occupation of "the rebel" Andrew Hunter's house: "The headquarters of Gen. Patterson are in the house of Andrew Hunters the leading rebel of this county, an accomplished and able lawyer, who prosecuted John Brown. Hunter ran for the Virginia Convention last January, as the rebel candidate, and was badly beaten. In May last, he ran as a candidate for the next Legislature of that State, and was elected by an overwhelming majority.--There was such a reaction between those two periods that the vote changed from 1,200 for Union in January, to 274 in May. "Mr. Hunter has deemed it convenient to leave with remarkable quickness, upon the approach of our column." Our opinion is, that Mr. Hunter's leaving did not display the "remarkable quickness" of the "grand army," on the retreat from Stone Bridge.
rton; of the 21st Ohio, was wounded, shot in the hip and taken prisoner; Capt. Allen killed — ball in the forehead, just between the eyes; Lieutenant Pomeroy was shot through the hip. He died on the Dunlefth, when the boat was near Gallipolis. The remains will be forwarded to his home, in Ottawa, Putnam county, Ohio, to-day. Lieutenant Pomeroy and Captain Allen were in Company B, 21st Ohio, Colonel Norton. During the engagement, De Villiers, (11th Ohio,) Col. Woodruff, Lieut. Col. Neff, and several Captains of the 2d Kentucky, mounted, rode up opposite the scene of action, and had not returned to their camp up to 12 M., on the 18th inst. The rebels were reported to be 1,500 strong, previous to being reinforced. A flag of truce had been sent out by the Federals, asking the privilege of visiting the rebel camp to gather the dead and wounded Petitions were also sent from Pt. Pleasant, signed by Capt. Norton, asking privilege to bring the Colonel back, who was reported wounded.
ing several officers. The ascertained loss of the Federals was 130 killed and 300 wounded, 20 prisoners, a cannon, baggage, and horses. In the affair on the North Missouri Railroad, near Millville station, there were 24 of the Federal troops killed. There was a complete understanding in that neighborhood not to permit the passage of the United States troops over the road. We copy the following from the Louisville Courier, of the 22d inst.: It was reported at Syracuse, on the 18th, that Colonel Magoffin had 350 men at Georgetown; also that State troops were concentrating near Arrow Rock. There is no doubt that the citizens of that region are almost unanimously opposed to acknowledging the Federal Government as now administered. Nothing definite is known of the fight between Gen. Harris and Col. McNeil's forces near Fulton, where a masked battery had been sprung on the Federals, a good many of whom were hit. The bridge and culverts on North Missousi Railroad had b
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