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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 27, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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September 6th (search for this): article 1
p would not come to my eyes, for my friend was wounded. Silently, and in small hours of the morning, I passed from my room to his; quietly opening the door, I called his name, and found that he, too, had been sleepless. Without a word of explanation, I went in the darkness to his bedside and leaned over him. He locked me in his embrace, and, shall I say it? we wept without a word; and I retired. Such, sir, was my friendship — such, his. My friend, Mr. President, was born on the 6th of September, in the year 1816, and consequently would have been forty five years of age on his approaching birth- day. A native of Georgia, and educated in his native State, he afterwards graduated at the University of our State with the highest honors that University can grant. Immediately thereafter he proceeded to the study and practice of the law in his native city, and that profession he prosecuted, unremittingly, down to the time of his connection with this Congress. He was seldom engaged
es, for my friend was wounded. Silently, and in small hours of the morning, I passed from my room to his; quietly opening the door, I called his name, and found that he, too, had been sleepless. Without a word of explanation, I went in the darkness to his bedside and leaned over him. He locked me in his embrace, and, shall I say it? we wept without a word; and I retired. Such, sir, was my friendship — such, his. My friend, Mr. President, was born on the 6th of September, in the year 1816, and consequently would have been forty five years of age on his approaching birth- day. A native of Georgia, and educated in his native State, he afterwards graduated at the University of our State with the highest honors that University can grant. Immediately thereafter he proceeded to the study and practice of the law in his native city, and that profession he prosecuted, unremittingly, down to the time of his connection with this Congress. He was seldom engaged in political life. Once
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
only speak from rumor; but I have taken pains to inquire from those who were nearest to him on that memorable occasion, and therefore I may speak with accuracy. During the day his own command had suffered much.--Towards noon, it became necessary, as I understand, for the left wing of our army, to keep from being flanked by the enemy, to fall back further and further towards its original position, occupied in the morning. About this time, the exact hour I cannot tell, my friend approached Beauregard, the General commanding, and said, "What shall now be done? Tell me, and if human effort can avail I will do it!" The reply was, "that battery should be silenced." Seizing the standard of his own regiment, and calling the remnants of his command to rally and follow him, he led the van in the charge of battle. A ball wounded him slightly and killed his horse under him. Still grasping the standard and rising again he mounted another horse, and waving his cap around his head, he cheered hi
Francis S. Bartow (search for this): article 1
Francis S. Bartow. In the Congress of the Confederate States, on Wednesday, an eloquent eulogy was pronounced upon Col. Francis S. Bartow, who fell at Stone Bridge. We copy the proceedings entCol. Francis S. Bartow, who fell at Stone Bridge. We copy the proceedings entire. The late Hon. Francis S. Bartow. Mr. Th R. R. Cobb, of Georgia.--Mr. President arise, sir, to announce the fact, too well known to this Congress, which saddens the faces of many convenedHon. Francis S. Bartow. Mr. Th R. R. Cobb, of Georgia.--Mr. President arise, sir, to announce the fact, too well known to this Congress, which saddens the faces of many convened here, and which is deeply felt by all. It is, that the mortal remains of our late colleague, the Hon. Francis S. Bartow, now lie in the other end of this Capitol, temporarily made a charnel house forthe Hon. Francis S. Bartow, now lie in the other end of this Capitol, temporarily made a charnel house for the illustrious dead. Mr. President, I confess it is one of the saddest duties I was ever called upon to perform I confess, moreover, my incompetency to perform it. To indulge in the formal gene Resolved, That Congress has heard with unfeigned sorrow of the death of the Hon. Francis S Bartow, one of the Delegates from the State of Georgia; that the natural exultation for a glorious vict
ever; but I thank God, yea, I would praise him, that to both of us he hath given a faith that pierces through the gloom of the grave and enters futurity, where it pictured the bright hope of a glorious meeting in an unending eternity, where clasped again in our friendly embraces, we may bask forever in the sunshine of God's love. In that hope may I live, in that faith may I die. I offer these resolutions: Resolved, That Congress has heard with unfeigned sorrow of the death of the Hon. Francis S Bartow, one of the Delegates from the State of Georgia; that the natural exultation for a glorious victory achieved by our arms, is checked by the heavy loss sustained by the Confederacy in the death of one of her most efficient counsellors; and that, as his colleagues, we feel a peculiar loss to ourselves, in one who had won our esteem, and gained much of our affection. Resolved, That with pleasure we record our admiration of his heroic defence on the field of battle, of the act
R. R. Cobb (search for this): article 1
Francis S. Bartow. In the Congress of the Confederate States, on Wednesday, an eloquent eulogy was pronounced upon Col. Francis S. Bartow, who fell at Stone Bridge. We copy the proceedings entire. The late Hon. Francis S. Bartow. Mr. Th R. R. Cobb, of Georgia.--Mr. President arise, sir, to announce the fact, too well known to this Congress, which saddens the faces of many convened here, and which is deeply felt by all. It is, that the mortal remains of our late colleague, the Hon. Francis S. Bartow, now lie in the other end of this Capitol, temporarily made a charnel house for the illustrious dead. Mr. President, I confess it is one of the saddest duties I was ever called upon to perform I confess, moreover, my incompetency to perform it. To indulge in the formal generalities usual upon such occasions, would illy comport with your feelings or with mine.--To yield to the teachings of my own heart would, perhaps, be a sign as inappropriate to-day; for, sir, in every
Stone Bridge (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
Francis S. Bartow. In the Congress of the Confederate States, on Wednesday, an eloquent eulogy was pronounced upon Col. Francis S. Bartow, who fell at Stone Bridge. We copy the proceedings entire. The late Hon. Francis S. Bartow. Mr. Th R. R. Cobb, of Georgia.--Mr. President arise, sir, to announce the fact, too well known to this Congress, which saddens the faces of many convened here, and which is deeply felt by all. It is, that the mortal remains of our late colleague, the Hon. Francis S. Bartow, now lie in the other end of this Capitol, temporarily made a charnel house for the illustrious dead. Mr. President, I confess it is one of the saddest duties I was ever called upon to perform I confess, moreover, my incompetency to perform it. To indulge in the formal generalities usual upon such occasions, would illy comport with your feelings or with mine.--To yield to the teachings of my own heart would, perhaps, be a sign as inappropriate to-day; for, sir, in every
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
We copy the proceedings entire. The late Hon. Francis S. Bartow. Mr. Th R. R. Cobb, of Georgia.--Mr. President arise, sir, to announce the fact, too well known to this Congress, which saddeconsequently would have been forty five years of age on his approaching birth- day. A native of Georgia, and educated in his native State, he afterwards graduated at the University of our State with went cheerfully, because a great public interest, upon which is based much of the prosperity of Georgia, not only lagged, but was abandoned by its friends. A great effort was necessary to be made inh unfeigned sorrow of the death of the Hon. Francis S Bartow, one of the Delegates from the State of Georgia; that the natural exultation for a glorious victory achieved by our arms, is checked by thesh the work which he so boldly aided to begin. Resolved, That we appreciate the loss which Georgia, his native State, has sustained in the death of one of her noblest sons, and that we tender to
Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
thful watcher. Jim was also stricken down by the fever, and my friend bathed his temples, and held his hand, and administered to his comfort even as the faithful servant had administered to himself. A few weeks ago, passing through the city of Savannah, and making his house my home, I noticed, sitting in his garden, several old decrepit slaves, I dared not ask him why they were there, but upon inquiring, I found that he had made the basement of his house, as it were, an alms-house for the decrnd was deeply impressed with the conviction that it was his duty to take his sword in hand and go to execute what he had thus devised. He communicated to myself and to others at Montgomery this intention. A company of volunteers of the city of Savannah, learning that such was his feeling, urged that they might be entered along with his own service, and that they might go together to the field of battle. They were thus tendered — they were thus accepted. Before he reached this city his merits
Ranaway --About the 1st of slay, from the tobacco factory of Kent & Wilson, Richmond, a Negro Boy, named Jim, about sixteen years old. He is a ly black Boy, about five feet high Said Negro is supposed to be lurking about Manchester, or Mr. John Clay's, in Chesterfield county where he has relatives I will give Ten dollars for the delivery of Jim to Mr. Pat. Gary, in Manchester, or if lodged in any jail so that I can get him again. Address, Alfred Mann, jy 25--tw* Keyaville. Va.
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