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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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ht, now bears two inscriptions, thus: On one side, "Pills for Rebels," U. S., July 7. On the other, "Return to plague the Inventor," "C. S., July 27." [We do not credit the report in reference to Mr. Beverly Tucker.--Eds.] The case of Mr. Ely. The correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer says: I am able to state that the story of Mr. Ely having been employed in ditching, or in any other menial employment, in entirely untrue. He has been uniformly well treated, and has farMr. Ely having been employed in ditching, or in any other menial employment, in entirely untrue. He has been uniformly well treated, and has fared sumptuously every day. Surgeon Norval, of the N. Y. 79th, brought a letter from him to President Lincoln. He says that a personal acquaintance with the Southern people has greatly modified his views in regard to them; and he suggests, in view of the thirteen hundred and fifty prisoners confined at Richmond, the propriety of adopting, in the future progress of the war, the usual rules of belligerent nations, particularly with regard to flags of truce, treatment and exchange of prisoners of w
have been storming the Government mess-room, which is especially obnoxious to them, because they say they prefer to draw their rations "crude," and cook for themselves. One of them, said to be a Baltimore man, has "struck" after a more downright style, for he has killed a teamster at the mess-room and escaped. So you see General McClellan's ways are not all ways of pleasantness, nor are all the paths of glory peace. Apprehensions growing out of the near neighborhood of Beauregard and Johnston play their part in the general flurry. A Mr. Cowling, living near Claremont, only five miles from Alexandria, came into town yesterday with a wagon load of furniture, and immediately returned for another, and his wife. He declares that the Confederates have got to Claremont and ordered him to quit. Mr. Cowling has many anxious friends in Washington to-day. The Star very consequentially denies the rumor current this afternoon, and indeed all day, that Gen. Rosencranz has been surroun
force at Booneville, and since acted as aid to General Price, was taken prisoner. The body of General Lyon has been embalmed for conveyance to his friends in Connection. The following additional names of officers killed have been ascertained; Captain Maron, of the First Iowa Regiment; Captain Brown, same regiment; Major Shaffer, reported, but not confirmed. Wounded Captain Gottschalk, First Iowa; Captain Swift and Captain Hatten, First Kansas; Captain Gilbert, First Infantry; Captain Cole. First Missouri; Lieutenant Brown, First Missouri. Southern report of Affairs South of thePotomac. Alexandria, Aug. 15. --Last night, between 11 and 12 o'clock, the enemy's signal lights were plainly seen from here in the direction of Fairfax Court House. They were visible for nearly an hour. Gen Hetzelman paid a visit to Alexandria to-day for the first time since the battle of Bull-Run. He is recovering slowly from the wound he received at that time, but hopes soon to
ect. Lieutenant Colonel Brand, who commanded the Confederate force at Booneville, and since acted as aid to General Price, was taken prisoner. The body of General Lyon has been embalmed for conveyance to his friends in Connection. The following additional names of officers killed have been ascertained; Captain Maron, of the First Iowa Regiment; Captain Brown, same regiment; Major Shaffer, reported, but not confirmed. Wounded Captain Gottschalk, First Iowa; Captain Swift and Captain Hatten, First Kansas; Captain Gilbert, First Infantry; Captain Cole. First Missouri; Lieutenant Brown, First Missouri. Southern report of Affairs South of thePotomac. Alexandria, Aug. 15. --Last night, between 11 and 12 o'clock, the enemy's signal lights were plainly seen from here in the direction of Fairfax Court House. They were visible for nearly an hour. Gen Hetzelman paid a visit to Alexandria to-day for the first time since the battle of Bull-Run. He is recovering slo
August 15th (search for this): article 1
near Springfield — further Particulars. St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 15. --Under date of Springfield, Aug. 12, the corresponhern report of Affairs South of thePotomac. Alexandria, Aug. 15. --Last night, between 11 and 12 o'clock, the enemy'bound to Washington. Washington items. Washington, Aug. 15. --About forty of the New York Highlanders, who are at the pleasure of the War Department. Washington, Aug. 15. --Reliable private advices from Texas, dated on theus case of the BaltimorePolice Commissioners. New York, Aug. 15. --Gen. Duryea was applied to in Brooklyn to know whondent of the Baltimore Exchange writes from Washington, August 15: The sharp practice of General McClellan had reducee another. Affairs in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Aug. 15. --Yesterday afternoon the privateersmen of the schour hundred dollars. Affairs in New York. New York, Aug. 15. --Yesterday morning there were in the port of New Y
rs. The Deputy Marshal who served the writ made his return to the Court, and stated that the officer refused to obey the writ and cursed and swore roundly, damning the courts and all civil authorities. An attachment was issued by Judge Wayne, the result of which was, that Col. Gorman made his appearance with the soldier. Arrest of a British subject. The New York Commercial, of Wednesday evening last, gives the following account of the arrest of Mr. Robert Mure, (erroneously printed Moore in our Saturday's issue,) of Charleston, S. C., a British subject, on the charge of being a bearer of dispatches from the Confederate Government: This morning a dispatch was received in this city from Washington advising the United States officers of this city to be on the alert for a person who left Charleston, South Carolina, a few days since, and directing that he be taken into custody, as they had received information which led them to believe he was a bearer of dispatches from Jeff
on and their right. They protested against the interference of the President, who, in appointing Col. Stevens, of Washington Territory, had given them a commander to whom personally they did not object, but whom they did not choose. 2nd. They had been promised by somebody that they should have a month's furlough, but the War Department ignores the matter, and protests that somebody has blundered.--The fact is that the "Highlanders," disgusted with their officers, since the death of Col. Cameron, and their most efficient Captains, have become turbulent and threatening. The consequences have been that it has taken four companies of cavalry, seven companies of infantry, and two full batteries of artillery to reduce the "Highlanders" to a sense of their situation, and even that not until the articles of war had been read to them, and they were threatened with the loss of their colors, degradation from their place in line, and the summary shooting of their ringleaders. Not
this cargo is one of a number which are to be sent South in the hope of running the blockade, and filling a contract with the Confederates for a million pairs of shoes, at $1.18 per pair. New York, Aug. 10.--Yesterday morning, George N. Saunders, late navy agent at this port, was declared a defaulter to the Government to the amount of $21,000, and the U. S. District Attorney issued a process against the sureties of Saunders to respond in accordance with their bonds. The sureties are Hon. Robert J Walker, ex-Secretary of the Treasury and ex-Governor of Kansas, and Zenc Secor, Esq, of Brooklyn. Arrests are now made of individuals for uttering opinions hostile to the Government.--Several persons have hurried from the city for fear of arrest, and the conspiracy law may be considered in full forces. Mrs. Abraham Lincoln, having arrived in this city, yesterday paid a visit to the Princess Clotilde, in her private apartments at the New York Hotel. The reception was a most co
n double ours, their force having moved in large bodies and our artillery playing on them with terrible effect. Lieutenant Colonel Brand, who commanded the Confederate force at Booneville, and since acted as aid to General Price, was taken prisoner. The body of General Lyon has been embalmed for conveyance to his friends in Connection. The following additional names of officers killed have been ascertained; Captain Maron, of the First Iowa Regiment; Captain Brown, same regiment; Major Shaffer, reported, but not confirmed. Wounded Captain Gottschalk, First Iowa; Captain Swift and Captain Hatten, First Kansas; Captain Gilbert, First Infantry; Captain Cole. First Missouri; Lieutenant Brown, First Missouri. Southern report of Affairs South of thePotomac. Alexandria, Aug. 15. --Last night, between 11 and 12 o'clock, the enemy's signal lights were plainly seen from here in the direction of Fairfax Court House. They were visible for nearly an hour. Gen Hetzel
e presence of a regiment, supposed to be Secessionists; but it is possible they were some of our own forces. Two young men were brought into camp to-day by the picket of Col. Biddle's regiment. Gen Banks ordered them to be retained under guard. From Fortress Monroe. Fortress Monroe, Aug. 14 --A few Confederate scouts attempted last night to cross Hampton Creek, but were fired upon by our pickets and quickly retired. Hampton is nightly visited by the Confederates. Lieut. Crosby's recent expedition to Accomac and Northampton counties has nearly broken up the contraband trade between the Eastern and Western shores of the Chesapeake. In some places visited by him there was a strong and outspoken Union sentiment. Five hundred unprepared letters from the Federal prisoners at Richmond to their Northern friends, left on the Baltimore boat by the released surgeons, were to-day generously forwarded by Gen. Butler. The new and formidable works on the Rip-Raps
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