hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 50 0 Browse Search
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) 36 0 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 24 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 22 10 Browse Search
John B. Floyd 22 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
France (France) 18 0 Browse Search
Hector Davis 18 0 Browse Search
John Tyler 18 0 Browse Search
Early 17 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 169 total hits in 53 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 4
on every point connected with it, and stated what his plan would be for bringing it to a close it the management of it had been left in his hands," &c.] Can the Government meet a reaction?--General McClellan at work. It remains to be seen if the plans of General Scott can now be followed. The reaction along the Mississippi will be great, and Major General Fremont, with great respect for his courage and enterprise, is not the man, I fear, to conduct large columns successfully. Missouri is anything but safe. Cairo is menaced, and my friends at Memphis seem to be stirring from their rest under their General. I regret that I cannot give any more interesting or important intelligence, bl I have not been able to go out for the last two days to the camps, as is common with many people in Washington. I was suffering a little from the weather — thunderstorms, rains, bad odors, which produce the usual results in garrisons and ill-drained cities. However, it is some co
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
the there branches of the Legislature, the people of the North will begin to feel that fighting is an expensive luxury, particularly if it be unsuccessful. Generals Banks, Butler, and the fortifications of Fortress Monroe--the Defences of James river. It will be weeks before we have done hearing and seeing accounts of Bell Run, or, as it may be better called, of Manassas, unless some other action intervenes, as is very likely indeed. Gen. Banks, not findnig any advantage in occupyorses and harness for his guns, as if he wanted to move them. He is a grim, sour, stern soldier of the old Puritan type, and it attacked he will defend his camp to the last. Should he be beaten, the Confederates will have both sides of James river. Relative value of the officers Slain of both sides. The more closely the consequences of Manassas are investigated, the more serious they seem to be. It must be granted that the Confederates feel their losses more severely than the N
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
d finally destroyed. The Navy-Yard would fall into the enemy's hands. Fort Washington would probably soon follow. Fortress Monroe would be condemned to greater isolation. Philadelphia itself would be in imminent danger should the Confederates atg is an expensive luxury, particularly if it be unsuccessful. Generals Banks, Butler, and the fortifications of Fortress Monroe--the Defences of James river. It will be weeks before we have done hearing and seeing accounts of Bell Run, or, with drawn all his troops to a position in Maryland, which commands the passages from the Ferry; and Gen. Butler, at Fortress Monroe, feels himself compelled to abandon his advanced works at Hampton, which I described hurriedly the other day, and to retire to the cover of the guns of the place. Fortress Monroe is quite impregnable to the enemy, for they have not the means of undertaking a regular reign. If they get heavy guns and mortars, however, they can certainly make the anterior unpleas
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
before we have done hearing and seeing accounts of Bell Run, or, as it may be better called, of Manassas, unless some other action intervenes, as is very likely indeed. Gen. Banks, not findnig any advantage in occupying a point in front of Harper's Ferry, on the Virginia side, has, it is affirmed, with drawn all his troops to a position in Maryland, which commands the passages from the Ferry; and Gen. Butler, at Fortress Monroe, feels himself compelled to abandon his advanced works at Hampton, which I described hurriedly the other day, and to retire to the cover of the guns of the place. Fortress Monroe is quite impregnable to the enemy, for they have not the means of undertaking a regular reign. If they get heavy guns and mortars, however, they can certainly make the anterior unpleasant, and should they open trenches the Americans may have a Sebastopol in rattan near Old Point Comfort. Meantimes the command of Col. Phalps, at Newport News, consisting of four regiments, i
Russia (Russia) (search for this): article 4
who uses them now will continue to do so, notwithstanding the tax, and no one will be the worse for it. On these plane it is probable there will be a conference between the two branches of the Legislature, in which the contending systems may be adjusted or amalgamated. The income tax to be adopted will give some $40,000,000, according to the calculations of the designers, and the people fondly believe it will be removed as soon as the war is over. The Mercantile interests of France and Russia--Opinions of Ministers of both these Countries. If the increase of ten per cent on the Morrill tariff be actually passed, it is difficult to see how France can continue to regard with friendly feelings such a direct attack on her great article of exportation. England is accustomed to hear these things from the United States, but France cannot afford any meddling or mischief in her wine trade and her tobacco monopoly. M. Mercier, the energetic and able representative of our ally, is sai
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 4
preservation of friendly relations between England and the United States, is the fact that a great change has come over the views of the members, or member of the Cabinet who was supposed to seek the reconstruction of the Union in a war with Great Britain, and that the most favorable disposition is evinced to cultivate our good graces, not by any sacrifice of principles, but by the adoption of a to eat once calm, just and dignified. which will be appreciated by the Foreign Office. It is not to actually existing Powers, and sedulously avoiding all occasion of offence or irritability to an irritable people, rendered more than usually so by the evil days which have fallen upon them, is the discreet and loyal nobleman who represents Great Britain, and who is the only one threatened with a withdrawal of passports and all sorts of pains and penalties for the presumed hostility of his Government to the United States. The North on the defensive. The world sees that the North has n
United States (United States) (search for this): article 4
Confederates could have marched into the Capital of the United States. They took no immediate steps to follow up their unexpservation of friendly relations between England and the United States, is the fact that a great change has come over the viewn. England is accustomed to hear these things from the United States, but France cannot afford any meddling or mischief in hies for the presumed hostility of his Government to the United States. The North on the defensive. The world sees thapared, and on the western side of the capital of the Confederate States there was available at least another corps of 10,000 of the Federal Government — what me Russell saw in the United States Post-Office. And as I have used the word "sympathiz a department king or low, of the public service of the United States in which there is not "treason"--I mean the aiding and saw him was at dinner with the Commissioners of the Confederate States at Washington, and I was rather surprised to see him
Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 4
rst to provide for its safety in American waters, and has also felt it desirable, in the face of the desperate counsels which have been given on this side of the Atlantic, to furnish a trifling reinforcement to her small military establishment in Canada. The fleet at present in observation is neither powerful nor offensively disposed, and no exception can be taken to the mode in which it has acted by the most sensitive American, although attempts have been made to arouse vulgar prejudices by eraces, not by any sacrifice of principles, but by the adoption of a to eat once calm, just and dignified. which will be appreciated by the Foreign Office. It is not probable, either, that we shall hear much more about the immediate annexation of Canada, and the fury of 750,000 "better than French" soldiers with which we were threatened will be for a time averted. The Morrill tariff as a cause of Embroilment But if there are such pleasant changes in the diplomatic and press world. ther
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 4
nd stated what his plan would be for bringing it to a close it the management of it had been left in his hands," &c.] Can the Government meet a reaction?--General McClellan at work. It remains to be seen if the plans of General Scott can now be followed. The reaction along the Mississippi will be great, and Major General Fremont, with great respect for his courage and enterprise, is not the man, I fear, to conduct large columns successfully. Missouri is anything but safe. Cairo is menaced, and my friends at Memphis seem to be stirring from their rest under their General. I regret that I cannot give any more interesting or important intelligence, bl I have not been able to go out for the last two days to the camps, as is common with many people in Washington. I was suffering a little from the weather — thunderstorms, rains, bad odors, which produce the usual results in garrisons and ill-drained cities. However, it is some consolation that there is nothing of
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 4
ld they open trenches the Americans may have a Sebastopol in rattan near Old Point Comfort. Meantimes the command of Col. Phalps, at Newport News, consisting of four regiments, is threatened by the enemy. His camp is intrenched and furnished with a few howivvers and field pieces, and heavy guns on the river face. I heard him apply to General Butler, when I was there, for horses and harness for his guns, as if he wanted to move them. He is a grim, sour, stern soldier of the old Puritan type, and it attacked he will defend his camp to the last. Should he be beaten, the Confederates will have both sides of James river. Relative value of the officers Slain of both sides. The more closely the consequences of Manassas are investigated, the more serious they seem to be. It must be granted that the Confederates feel their losses more severely than the North does. Their Colonels and officers are men of mark, and even of privates killed or wounded one sees notices imply
1 2 3 4 5 6