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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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es, in order to realize before civil war breaks out. My opinion is, there will be no secession for long. North will cut off supply of ice, Southerners will have none to make mint juleps; whole South in a state of Ancient Mariner, have to cave in, and there will be an end of this escapade. Once more eagle will soar above prostrate body of defeated anarchy; lion will lie down with lamb; everything O. K.* Talking of customs of country, I wish you would publish accompanying portrait of Col. Bronze, gentlemanly proprietor of Pavilion Hotel. Also, portraits of Jim Snookenback, gentlemanly barkeeper, and Mr. Kelly, gentlemanly porter of hotel. These little attentions quite usual, I assure you — custom of country. Hope you will not allow yourself to be influenced by any absurd, preconceived prejudices against pulling; if so, it will seriously embarrass private arrangements of Yours, Gorilla. [We have received 1,376 applications from gentlemen residing in America, each applicant of
Jim Snookenback (search for this): article 1
l be no secession for long. North will cut off supply of ice, Southerners will have none to make mint juleps; whole South in a state of Ancient Mariner, have to cave in, and there will be an end of this escapade. Once more eagle will soar above prostrate body of defeated anarchy; lion will lie down with lamb; everything O. K.* Talking of customs of country, I wish you would publish accompanying portrait of Col. Bronze, gentlemanly proprietor of Pavilion Hotel. Also, portraits of Jim Snookenback, gentlemanly barkeeper, and Mr. Kelly, gentlemanly porter of hotel. These little attentions quite usual, I assure you — custom of country. Hope you will not allow yourself to be influenced by any absurd, preconceived prejudices against pulling; if so, it will seriously embarrass private arrangements of Yours, Gorilla. [We have received 1,376 applications from gentlemen residing in America, each applicant offering to become our war correspondent. We will see about it; but at the same
Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 1
to flatter, Yankee Doodle, &c. Yankee Doodle, having floored His separated brothers, Be reckoned his victorious sword Would turn against us others, Secession first he would put down, Wholly and forever; And afterwards, from Britain's crown He Canada would sever, Yankee Doodle, &c. England offering neutral sauce To goose as well as gander, Was what made Yankee Doodle cross, And did inflame his dander, As though with choler drunk, he fumed, And threatened vengeance martial, Because Old Englght slick he threw Both away together, In his cap, to public view, Showing the white feather. Yankee Doodle, &c. Yankee Doodle, Doodle Do, Whither are you flying! "A cocked-hat we've been licked into, And knocked to Hades," crying. Well, to Canada, air-ee, Now that, by secession, I am driven up a tree, To seize that there possession. Yankee Doodle, &c. Yankee Doodle, be content, You've had a lenient whipping; Court not further punishment By enterprise of stripping Those neighbors, whom
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
s old. Several fine hotels, two or three excellent churches, and very nice arsenal. Voluminous market place, well supplied with okra, squash, pumpkins, peanuts, pop corn, yams, squirrels, robins, clams, &c. Mutton and beef not very abundant, South Carolina having seceded from butcher's meat. City Hall a neat little edifice. Post Office somewhere in church. There is a good deal of sea, and bay, and water of one kind and another round about, with several forts in it and on it. Good esplanade, Attended grand caucus last night — great demonstration. Principal speaker burst all buttons off shirt front, said if Northern States would only contract to carry the mails as usual, and supply them with ice, poultry, hay and fire-arms, South Carolina would never surrender, rather perish! Patriot's grave better far than something else — patriot's everything better than everything else, nothing like patriots, in fact every man not patriot ought to have his head punched (or words to that ef
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
orally, if not Men of equal mettle. Yankee Doodle, &c. Yankee Doodle, near Bull Run, Met his adversary; First he thought the fight he'd won; Fact proved quite conral Army, July 21, 1861. First face.[by the Times' special correspondent.]Bull Run. Bull Run? Which Bull? Write out the name in full. That when posteriBull Run? Which Bull? Write out the name in full. That when posterity the tale shall con. She may be thoroughly aware the Bull That made the run, was Jonathan, not John. Second face.[by a Yankee Volunteer.]Manassas Junost go-ahead of nations: and after hearing how they went ahead in running from Bull Run. we cannot well dispute there being some ground for their boast. The Run upon Washington. The defeat of the Federal forces at Bull Run will, it is said, lead to a change of the name of the rivulet so heretofore denominated. Those who are apt to boast that they whipped Bull have now been whipped themselves. Bull Run that was, therefore, we understand, is henceforth to be called Jonathan's run.
Austria (Austria) (search for this): article 1
clock, still it is almost impossible to prevent balls flying about occasionally. Gentleman, this morning made winning hazard off back of my head, but they would not let it count, which I was sorry for on the whole, stroke unintentional I know, but billiard balls hard, and human nature weak, particular about lower part back of head. As for food live on clover, or something confoundedly like it. Call it gumbo, have it three times a day. Yesterday dined off split chicken, looked like arms of Austria broiled. For breakfast they serve us species of vulcanized pancake, known I think (mind only think, so if mistaken do not set me down as another Mr. Arrowroot, of Times correspondence notoriety), known I think, as corn-dodgers, or flap-jack.--One plastic substance served up with treacle, so as to resemble blister, is I know called buckwheat cake. To-day witnessed one of institutions of country in its most striking aspect. Public barroom free at lunch time. Most drinking saloons of a
St. Johns (Michigan, United States) (search for this): article 1
Punch on the American rebellion.the Civil war in America. Charleston, July 26 1861. Mr. Punch, Sir --I have a proposition to make. Your valuable journal, world-wide reputation, great influence, ought to have, like other papers, special correspondent at seat of war. I am the man. In short, war correspondent by nature. If you accept my offer I will telegraph my letters to St. Johns, N. B., whence they will be forwarded to you via steamer — thus you will obtain details ahead of all rivals. Of course in sending communications over the wires, I must be as concise as possible, to save time and expense, which may produce a certain twitchiness of style, to this, however you may not object. Accompanying letter specimen of my style:-- Am now in Charleston, very centre of secessionism. Was told in the North I should be able to get neither lodging nor food in this city. How absurdly things are exaggerated at distance. Found little or no difficulty in securing fair portio
August 25th (search for this): article 1
One hundred Dollars Reward. --Ranaway, on the 25th of August, two Negro men, named John and Charles. John is twenty-four years old; black; has a full head of hair: is 6 feet 1 inch high: will weigh about 200 pounds; had on when he left a soft black hat, drab coat and blue cotton pants. Charles, his brother, is 20 years old; black; has a full head of hair: is 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high; weighs about 155 or 170 pounds. He also had on a soft black hat, drab coat and blue pants. I purchased them of W. C. Vanmeter, who lives near Moorefield. Va. I think it likely they will try and get back there.--They came to Richmond by railroad from Strasburg. I will give the above reward for them, or fifty Dollars for either, delivered to Hector Davis, Richmond. John D. Ragland. au 28--2w*
Hector Davis (search for this): article 1
One hundred Dollars Reward. --Ranaway, on the 25th of August, two Negro men, named John and Charles. John is twenty-four years old; black; has a full head of hair: is 6 feet 1 inch high: will weigh about 200 pounds; had on when he left a soft black hat, drab coat and blue cotton pants. Charles, his brother, is 20 years old; black; has a full head of hair: is 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high; weighs about 155 or 170 pounds. He also had on a soft black hat, drab coat and blue pants. I purchased them of W. C. Vanmeter, who lives near Moorefield. Va. I think it likely they will try and get back there.--They came to Richmond by railroad from Strasburg. I will give the above reward for them, or fifty Dollars for either, delivered to Hector Davis, Richmond. John D. Ragland. au 28--2w*
John D. Ragland (search for this): article 1
One hundred Dollars Reward. --Ranaway, on the 25th of August, two Negro men, named John and Charles. John is twenty-four years old; black; has a full head of hair: is 6 feet 1 inch high: will weigh about 200 pounds; had on when he left a soft black hat, drab coat and blue cotton pants. Charles, his brother, is 20 years old; black; has a full head of hair: is 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high; weighs about 155 or 170 pounds. He also had on a soft black hat, drab coat and blue pants. I purchased them of W. C. Vanmeter, who lives near Moorefield. Va. I think it likely they will try and get back there.--They came to Richmond by railroad from Strasburg. I will give the above reward for them, or fifty Dollars for either, delivered to Hector Davis, Richmond. John D. Ragland. au 28--2w*
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