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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Tahlequah (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): article 4
The Cherokee Indians. four thousand Indians in council — speech by the Principal Chief — Alliance with the Confederate States. The determination of the Cherokee Indians to unite their fortunes with the Confederate States of America has already been announced. A grand council, consisting of about four thousand persons, was held at Tahlequah on the 21st of August, when John Ross, the principal Chief delivered the following address: Friends and Fellow-Citizens--It affords me great pleasure to see so many of you on the present occasion. The invitation to you to meet here went from the Executive Department in compliance with the wishes of many citizens, who desired to make stronger the cords that bind us together, and to advance the common welfare. The circumstances under which you have assembled are full of import. You have precious rights at stake, and your posterity, it may be, will be affected by the sentiments you may express. You need not be told that e
Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): article 4
lving upon them of deciding to some extent the course to be pursued by the Cherokee Nation in the conflict between the whites, to whom she was equally bound in peacehether you have any wish or purpose to abolish or interfere with it in the Cherokee Nation? The position I have assumed in regard to all the important questionse with the Confederate States upon terms honorable and advantageous to the Cherokee Nation. The following preamble and resolutions were subsequently adopted by hereas, we, the Cherokee people, have been invited by the Executive of the Cherokee Nation, in compliance with the request of many citizens, to meet in general meetiThat we proclaim unwavering attachment to the Constitution and Laws of the Cherokee Nation, and solemnly pledge ourselves to defend and support the same, and as far olved, That reposing full confidence in the constituted authorities of the Cherokee Nation, we submit to their wisdom the management of all questions which affect ou
United States (United States) (search for this): article 4
already engaged in deadly conflicts. The United States claim to contend for the integrity of their Government — the Confederate States for their independence and a Government of their own. Giganticd by correspondence with officers of the Confederate States, and the delicate and responsible duty dStates. Those relations still exist. The United States have not asked us to engage in the war, an had we any cause to take arms against the United States, and prematurely and want only stake our lthem by the officers and citizens of the Confederate States. My fellow-citizens, you have now aus, have severed their connection from the United States and joined the Confederate States. Our geeliminary steps for an alliance with the Confederate States upon terms honorable and advantageous ton the war pending between the United and Confederate States, and tender to Gen. McCulloch our thankse relations between the United and Confederate States of America, and which may render an alliance [5 more...]
McCulloch (search for this): article 4
m the fearful condition of affairs among the people of the several States; and for the purpose of giving a free and frank expression to the real sentiments we cherish toward each other, and of our true position in regard to questions which affect the general welfare; and particularly on the subject of slavery; Therefore, be it Resolved, That we fully approve the neutrality recommended by the Principal Chief, in the war pending between the United and Confederate States, and tender to Gen. McCulloch our thanks for the respect he has shown to our position. Resolved, That we renew the pledges given by the Executive of this Nation, of the friendship of the Cherokees towards the people of all the States and particularly towards these on our immediate border, with whom our relations have been harmonious and cordial, and from whom they should not be separated. Resolved, That we also take occasion to renew to the Creeks, Choctaws, Seminoles, Chickasaws and Osages, assurances of
John Ross (search for this): article 4
The Cherokee Indians. four thousand Indians in council — speech by the Principal Chief — Alliance with the Confederate States. The determination of the Cherokee Indians to unite their fortunes with the Confederate States of America has already been announced. A grand council, consisting of about four thousand persons, was held at Tahlequah on the 21st of August, when John Ross, the principal Chief delivered the following address: Friends and Fellow-Citizens--It affords me great pleasure to see so many of you on the present occasion. The invitation to you to meet here went from the Executive Department in compliance with the wishes of many citizens, who desired to make stronger the cords that bind us together, and to advance the common welfare. The circumstances under which you have assembled are full of import. You have precious rights at stake, and your posterity, it may be, will be affected by the sentiments you may express. You need not be told that e
August 21st (search for this): article 4
The Cherokee Indians. four thousand Indians in council — speech by the Principal Chief — Alliance with the Confederate States. The determination of the Cherokee Indians to unite their fortunes with the Confederate States of America has already been announced. A grand council, consisting of about four thousand persons, was held at Tahlequah on the 21st of August, when John Ross, the principal Chief delivered the following address: Friends and Fellow-Citizens--It affords me great pleasure to see so many of you on the present occasion. The invitation to you to meet here went from the Executive Department in compliance with the wishes of many citizens, who desired to make stronger the cords that bind us together, and to advance the common welfare. The circumstances under which you have assembled are full of import. You have precious rights at stake, and your posterity, it may be, will be affected by the sentiments you may express. You need not be told that e