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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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France (France) (search for this): article 5
ome organ — a New York paper going so far as to assert that the letter was written by the Prince himself, or at his dictation.--The letter is dated New York, July 31st: In the United States the individual initiative is everything, just as in France the governmental initiative is everything. And so even the military organization rest naturally among Americans on principles entirely at variance with those on which we act. I confess that in this respect the system of self-government reaches ahe millionaire bankers of Philadelphia and New York that become simple Zouaves; and on the other, that foreigners prevail in the ranks of the new corps. Hence the tendency you must have remarked to nationalize companies, and even regiments. France, Scotland, Ireland, Germany and Italy have given their names, varied in a thousand shapes, to a great number of corps, the elements of which have been furnished by those countries respectively.--In the clashing of warlike nationalities, that whic
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 5
present the scum of emigration, and will be recruited among that floating mass of adventurers whom Europe sends to the United States, and whom work disgusts as well in the New as in the Old World. It is certain on one side, that it is not the millionaire bankers of Philadelphia and New York that become simple Zouaves; and on the other, that foreigners prevail in the ranks of the new corps. Hence the tendency you must have remarked to nationalize companies, and even regiments. France, Scotland, Ireland, Germany and Italy have given their names, varied in a thousand shapes, to a great number of corps, the elements of which have been furnished by those countries respectively.--In the clashing of warlike nationalities, that which eclipses all others is the French nationality, personified, of course, in the Zouave. Everything at New York is in the Zouave style — fashions, handbills, theatrical spectacles. More Zouaves (the uniform of the Imperial Guard) are met in the streets of Ne
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
k paper going so far as to assert that the letter was written by the Prince himself, or at his dictation.--The letter is dated New York, July 31st: In the United States the individual initiative is everything, just as in France the governmental initiative is everything. And so even the military organization rest naturally amopopulation, the volunteer army will only present the scum of emigration, and will be recruited among that floating mass of adventurers whom Europe sends to the United States, and whom work disgusts as well in the New as in the Old World. It is certain on one side, that it is not the millionaire bankers of Philadelphia and New Yorker only for a sentiment, for a point of honor, and almost through a chivalrous spirit. But there is nothing save contrast, or rather inconsequence, in the United States. They vote hundreds of millions, well knowing that they will not pay them; they vote soldiers well knowing that the soldiers will not come; and in spite of an
Solferino (Italy) (search for this): article 5
hich eclipses all others is the French nationality, personified, of course, in the Zouave. Everything at New York is in the Zouave style — fashions, handbills, theatrical spectacles. More Zouaves (the uniform of the Imperial Guard) are met in the streets of New York than in the streets of Paris.--Whole companies are really composed of Frenchmen, who have served less or more, and who seem to look down upon all other soldiers — Americans, English, Germans, &c.--from the top of the tower of Solferino or the Malakoff. I should be sorry to pass a rash judgment upon brave compatriots, who appear to me to be very careless, very gay, very sociable; but I cannot help reflecting upon what series of adventures have been able to bring these Parisians from the Place Manbert to the shores of the Potomac, there to risk their lives for the greater glory of President Lincoln, at the rate of eleven dollars per month. Seriously, I do not believe that the eleven dollars go for everything. At first,
rals pass and repass before our eyes, without the possibility of following them, step by step, in all the places of a war, as we do with our generals, whose military destiny is in variably linked with that of the constituted fractions, of which the titular command is confided to them. When the great battle of the 21st was fought at Manassas Junction, the direction of it was given to a General McDowell, without its being easy to say why; and what is still less comprehensible, is that General Scott, the generalissimo, a very brave, capable and esteemed soldier, gave the order to the whole army to attack the enemy, and to engage in a general affair, without going himself on the field of battle I reserve to myself to write you hereafter on the strategic position of the armies, as well on the Potomac as in the provinces, and I will endeavor to learn the truth on the subject of the battle of the st which was so shameful an affair for the North. That which I can tell you is that here,
Americans (search for this): article 5
the individual initiative is everything, just as in France the governmental initiative is everything. And so even the military organization rest naturally among Americans on principles entirely at variance with those on which we act. I confess that in this respect the system of self-government reaches almost the extreme limit of than in the streets of Paris.--Whole companies are really composed of Frenchmen, who have served less or more, and who seem to look down upon all other soldiers — Americans, English, Germans, &c.--from the top of the tower of Solferino or the Malakoff. I should be sorry to pass a rash judgment upon brave compatriots, who appear to n, at the rate of eleven dollars per month. Seriously, I do not believe that the eleven dollars go for everything. At first, with more clearness of vision than Americans, English and Germans, they appeared to me to reckon little upon the eleven dollars; but what I can certify is, that they are quite insensible to the glory of the
ly.--In the clashing of warlike nationalities, that which eclipses all others is the French nationality, personified, of course, in the Zouave. Everything at New York is in the Zouave style — fashions, handbills, theatrical spectacles. More Zouaves (the uniform of the Imperial Guard) are met in the streets of New York than in the streets of Paris.--Whole companies are really composed of Frenchmen, who have served less or more, and who seem to look down upon all other soldiers — Americans, English, Germans, &c.--from the top of the tower of Solferino or the Malakoff. I should be sorry to pass a rash judgment upon brave compatriots, who appear to me to be very careless, very gay, very sociable; but I cannot help reflecting upon what series of adventures have been able to bring these Parisians from the Place Manbert to the shores of the Potomac, there to risk their lives for the greater glory of President Lincoln, at the rate of eleven dollars per month. Seriously, I do not believe t
temporary command of the regiments assembled for that operation. It is thus that American generals pass and repass before our eyes, without the possibility of following them, step by step, in all the places of a war, as we do with our generals, whose military destiny is in variably linked with that of the constituted fractions, of which the titular command is confided to them. When the great battle of the 21st was fought at Manassas Junction, the direction of it was given to a General McDowell, without its being easy to say why; and what is still less comprehensible, is that General Scott, the generalissimo, a very brave, capable and esteemed soldier, gave the order to the whole army to attack the enemy, and to engage in a general affair, without going himself on the field of battle I reserve to myself to write you hereafter on the strategic position of the armies, as well on the Potomac as in the provinces, and I will endeavor to learn the truth on the subject of the battle of t
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 5
less or more, and who seem to look down upon all other soldiers — Americans, English, Germans, &c.--from the top of the tower of Solferino or the Malakoff. I should be sorry to pass a rash judgment upon brave compatriots, who appear to me to be very careless, very gay, very sociable; but I cannot help reflecting upon what series of adventures have been able to bring these Parisians from the Place Manbert to the shores of the Potomac, there to risk their lives for the greater glory of President Lincoln, at the rate of eleven dollars per month. Seriously, I do not believe that the eleven dollars go for everything. At first, with more clearness of vision than Americans, English and Germans, they appeared to me to reckon little upon the eleven dollars; but what I can certify is, that they are quite insensible to the glory of the flag with the thirty-four stars and the fate of the unfortunate negroes. You see by this what the weak side of all this organization is; it is not an aff
August 19th (search for this): article 5
A French correspondent's view of the war in America. The following is an extract from the translation of an American correspondence, which appears in the Paris journal, L'Opinion Nationale, of the 19th August. It is interesting, and obtains some importance from the fact of its appearing exclusively in Prince Napoleon's home organ — a New York paper going so far as to assert that the letter was written by the Prince himself, or at his dictation.--The letter is dated New York, July 31st: In the United States the individual initiative is everything, just as in France the governmental initiative is everything. And so even the military organization rest naturally among Americans on principles entirely at variance with those on which we act. I confess that in this respect the system of self-government reaches almost the extreme limit of the possible. Up to the present the enrollment of volunteers goes on pretty well, but it cannot be expected that four hundred thousand fighting
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