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Operations of Gen. Wise. --Extract from a private letter dated September 6th, eight below Dogwood Gap, on New river: "On the 2d, we marched from Dogwood Camp with parts of three pieces and two regiments, leaving two guns and a garrison at dogwood. During the day, we occupied the "Hawk's Nest," and took possession of Miller's Ferry. The enemy was camped beyond Big Creek. Having discovered one of his camps unguarded, Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson was started through the mountains to surprise them at day-break. About sunset, we pushed on in front till darkness overtook as, and unfortunately a little too far. At the bridge, over McGrom's Creek, a strong detachment ambuscaded our advance, consisting of the Beirne Sharp-Shooters, Captain Somers. Third Regiment of Wise Legion. The General himself was on the bridge, and called on his men to charge, which they did with the utmost gallantry, at once dispersing the enemy. We had only three wounded--less than I expected, as the en
he harbor, and reported herself to the authorities of that island as being on a cruise. She was last from Puerto Caballo, and since she succeeded in getting out of the Mississippi river she had already captured no less than eleven American vessels. The Sumter landed eight prisoners in a destitute condition. Contributions were made for supplying their immediate wants, and care would be taken of them until they could be shipped to the United States. The Sumter remained there until the 5th ultimo, and was allowed to supply herself with coals and other necessary outfits. The British flag was hoisted on the Government flag-staff for her arrival, and the officers of the British vessel Cadmus appeared to be on the most amicable terms with those of the Sumter. The merchant who supplied the coals did it with the consent and approval of the Attorney General. There had been no American Consul at Trinidad for many months. Privateers fitting out. Capt. Welch, of the schooner M
erfectly firm, the heavy and rough masonry was removed, preparatory to the erection of a splendid fortress, which it is expected will be finished in good time by the C. S. A. "The present aspect of the place is rough and savage; the music of the surrounding elements of air and sea is in keeping with the dreariness and desolation of the spot." The Opera House was crowded again last night, and the concert of the Amateur Minstrels passed off in splendid style — another decided success. It is the opinion of wise men here that the work upon the Merrimac should be continuous; that a more full and efficient force--two sets of hands — should be employed at night and on Sundays, in order to have her important services at an early day. A large steamer went to Newport News on Tuesday and left yesterday. A large lot of clothing, medicines, &c., will shortly be sent by some generous ladies of this city to the Hampton Greys, at Yorktown, and the Wythe Rifles, at Williamsburg
A fire in Pittsburg, Pa., on the 10th, destroyed property to the amount of $60,000, including about $10,000 worth of "contraband" goods which had been seized in that place. W. Hutton, a traveling agent of the Ohio Central Railroad, has been committed at Cincinnati, to answer a charge of treason. The arrival of the Prince de Joinville at New York is announced.
April 16th (search for this): article 2
Bath still remained unrepresented, (pardon me, I did not intend to insinuate that her brave and gallant sons have not volunteered their services for the protection of all that is so dear to them on earth — their State, their Government, their liberty, their families and their homes--God and justice forbid that such should have been my intention;) but I did intend to say that she remained as yet unrepresented by any one in your long list of correspondents. But to proceed; Virginia seceded April 16th; the following Monday (22d) Bath sent a splendid company of dragoons, numbering eighty-five men, who were ordered to Staunton; were mustered into service the latter part of May; were ordered to proceed to Grafton; were in the retreat of the handful of men at Philippi, before the Yankee army; were at Beverly several weeks before any other cavalry arrived, and performed all the scouting for many miles around. They were also in Garnett's retreat. All of the company are now unfit for duty, w
o dear to them on earth — their State, their Government, their liberty, their families and their homes--God and justice forbid that such should have been my intention;) but I did intend to say that she remained as yet unrepresented by any one in your long list of correspondents. But to proceed; Virginia seceded April 16th; the following Monday (22d) Bath sent a splendid company of dragoons, numbering eighty-five men, who were ordered to Staunton; were mustered into service the latter part of May; were ordered to proceed to Grafton; were in the retreat of the handful of men at Philippi, before the Yankee army; were at Beverly several weeks before any other cavalry arrived, and performed all the scouting for many miles around. They were also in Garnett's retreat. All of the company are now unfit for duty, with the exception of six; they are at present in Major Lee's squadron of cavalry. This company consists of as fine material as any in the service. They were presented with a sple
Day of atonement. --This, tenth day of the month of Tishri, is called the day of atonement, (Yom Kippur,) and is decreed in Holy Writ as a solemn fast for the pardon of sin of the Jewish nation to those who are true and sincere in their repentance. This day is considered the most holy day in the year, and is set apart entirely for fasting, praying, and repentance, It is thus related in the Pentateuch: "On the tenth day of the seventh month is the day of atonement; it shall be to you a day of holy convocation, and you shall afflict your souls, (by fasting;) ye shall do no work on that same day, for it is a day of atonement on which you shall be pardoned before the Eternal your God; it shall be to you a complete day of rest, and you shall afflict your souls, (by fasting;) on the evening of the ninth day you shall begin, and keep your resting day until the next evening." This day is also a day of reconciliation and peace-making between man and man; for no one could expect to be for
July 19th (search for this): article 9
ked if the visit was one of business or courtesy? They were informed that it was a visit of courtesy. They said such a visit would be received in like spirit, and shook hands cordially. Capt. Morse said the shooting of pickets had been a matter or much regret, and urged that it should stop. The rebel officers assented, and the four agreed to do all in their power to this end. The conversation lasted nearly an hour, when they separated, shaking hands. Capt. Porter was at the fights of the 19th and 21st July, but said he was glad no blood yet stained his hands. He has two cousins in the Northern army. But, in spite of the agreement, picket-firing continued all the afternoon, the same as before. Nobody was hurt. The Confederate army. The Washington correspondent of the New York Express writes: The enemy continues to strengthen himself over the river. It is unquestionable that he is about to be reinforced by Gen. Bragg with three regiments from the Florida wing of th
July 21st (search for this): article 9
isit was one of business or courtesy? They were informed that it was a visit of courtesy. They said such a visit would be received in like spirit, and shook hands cordially. Capt. Morse said the shooting of pickets had been a matter or much regret, and urged that it should stop. The rebel officers assented, and the four agreed to do all in their power to this end. The conversation lasted nearly an hour, when they separated, shaking hands. Capt. Porter was at the fights of the 19th and 21st July, but said he was glad no blood yet stained his hands. He has two cousins in the Northern army. But, in spite of the agreement, picket-firing continued all the afternoon, the same as before. Nobody was hurt. The Confederate army. The Washington correspondent of the New York Express writes: The enemy continues to strengthen himself over the river. It is unquestionable that he is about to be reinforced by Gen. Bragg with three regiments from the Florida wing of the Confedera
July 30th (search for this): article 9
battle had been fought between Montgomery and Rains up to the previous Tuesday. McCulloch was reported to be at Fort Smith, and his troops on route for Fort Walker, in Arkansas. Nothing definite was known of his future movements. Gen. Price had gone to reinforce Gen. Rains. Fremont's proclamation created considerable excitement at Springfield. The privateer Sumter at Trinidad. The Government has received advices from Trinidad, dated August 7th, by which it appears that on the 30th of July the privateer Sumter sailed boldly into the harbor, and reported herself to the authorities of that island as being on a cruise. She was last from Puerto Caballo, and since she succeeded in getting out of the Mississippi river she had already captured no less than eleven American vessels. The Sumter landed eight prisoners in a destitute condition. Contributions were made for supplying their immediate wants, and care would be taken of them until they could be shipped to the United State
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