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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 17, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,193 total hits in 603 results.

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Foreign Details by the Africa. Awful Calamity in Turin — Destructive Fire in Lenden — Public Anxiety with regard to the Cotton Supply in England, &c., &c The Cunard Steamship Africa, Capt. Shannon, which sailed from Liverpool at 3 o'clock on the afternoon of the 31st ult., and from Queenstown on the 1st inst., arrived at New York at 10 o'clock on the night of the 12th inst., bringing passengers and the European mails dated on the 31st of August. Dreadful Calamity in Turin. A letter from Turin, of the 28th of August says: A very awful calamity has befallen Turin this morning. A fire broke out in the Via diPo, which resisted for a few hours the efforts of the fire brigade, aided by the regular troops. These latter were carried away by their zeal for the public cause, and ventured into the burning buildings with a rash courage, to which about a dozen of them fell victims. Colonel Trotti, a brave Piedmontese officer; Major Fiore, of the Carabineers, and an
From California. --The steamer Champion, from Aspinwall on the 5th inst., has arrived at New York, bringing over two hundred passengers and one million dollars in gold from California. Among the passengers by the steamer Champion are Major Allen, Lieut. Higgeston, Dr. Steinberger; Lieuts. Harker, Alexander Ball, and Ingman; Capts. Hancock, Mason, Myers and Gregg, and Maj. Greer, of the United States Army. The ship Narragansett was at Manzanilla August 29. The steamer Champion towed the United States brig Bainbridge from Navy Bay into the Carribean sea. The United States frigate Lancaster was at Panama on the 3d. Lieut. Harris died on the 24th ult., and was buried. He was a native of New Hampshire. Gen. Mosquera had proclaimed himself President of New Grenada, and had exiled a dozen Jesuis priests, and sent envoys to England and France. The health of the Isthmus was good.
Terrible accident from the Careless use of fire-arms. --As a volunteer company were executing military movements at Benson, Vt., on the 3d inst., they discharged their guns toward the crowd of people witnessing the parade. To their astonishment and sorrow, eight persons dropped upon the ground, all of whom were wounded. Upon examination, it was found that some of the cartridges contained shot and ball, while they supposed them to be free from everything but powder and noise.
vessel from or to this port. Indeed, it was stated that the Captain of one of Messrs. A. Campbell & Co.'s vessels that left here some time ago, had been seen on board. There were vessels bearing the flag of the United States in the Gulf, and others expected, the fate of which, if the Sumter thought proper to wait upon them outside the Bocas, could not be doubtful. Anxiety was felt about one of Messrs. Dwight's vessels, which it was said left here with a considera-amount of specie on the 4th inst., and even there seemed to be some fears of the Sea Eagle, now unloading a valuable cargo, consigned to Messrs. C. L. Haley & Co. The local authorities scareely knew how to receive officers sailing under this novel flag, for though the British Government have recognized the existence of two belligerent Powers in the States, still, as far as we know, there has been as yet no recognition of the Confederate States as a sovereign Power. We believe that his Excellency declined to receiv
Detailed account of the burning of the Alvarade — Masked Batteries on the Florida Coast. It was recently stated that the U. S. sloop-of-war Jamestown, Commander Green, seized and burned the bark Alvarado, off Fernandina, Fla., on the 5th ult. It appears she had been captured by the privateer Jeff. Davis, and was stranded on the Florida coast eight hundred yards from shore, to prevent her re-capture by the Jamestown. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer, in a letter dated "Off Fernandina," after giving an account of the pursuit of the Jamestown and the stranding of the Alvarado by her crew, says: Soon after she stranded, her boats were lowered, and her crew escaped, carrying with them, no doubt, all available valuables, and leaving the bark with all sail on, to drift farther in shore, in the vain hope of afterwards getting her off or discharging her cargo in boats. By this time the Jamestown had got near enough, it was thought, to bring the bark within range of her
From California. --The steamer Champion, from Aspinwall on the 5th inst., has arrived at New York, bringing over two hundred passengers and one million dollars in gold from California. Among the passengers by the steamer Champion are Major Allen, Lieut. Higgeston, Dr. Steinberger; Lieuts. Harker, Alexander Ball, and Ingman; Capts. Hancock, Mason, Myers and Gregg, and Maj. Greer, of the United States Army. The ship Narragansett was at Manzanilla August 29. The steamer Champion towed the United States brig Bainbridge from Navy Bay into the Carribean sea. The United States frigate Lancaster was at Panama on the 3d. Lieut. Harris died on the 24th ult., and was buried. He was a native of New Hampshire. Gen. Mosquera had proclaimed himself President of New Grenada, and had exiled a dozen Jesuis priests, and sent envoys to England and France. The health of the Isthmus was good.
ken, to the effect that these did not fall within the category of prohibited goods, the steamer got supplied. The officers and men have frequently been on shore, and numerous visits have been paid on board the Sumter by gentlemen of the town, and by them the courtesy and frank kindness of the officers is spoken of very highly. The Captain of the Sumter, the day after his arrival, put on shore some prize prisoners (the mate and crew of the Philadelphia bark Joseph Maxwell), and on the 5th instant the Sumter left the Gulf "on a cruise." The U. S. Steamer Keystone State in pursuit of the Sumter.[from the Barbadoes Liberal, Aug. 13.] The United States war steamer Keystone State, 8, Commander Scott, arrived in Carlisle. Bay from St. Thomas yesterday, in search, it was rumored during the day, of the Southern steamer Sumter, which we last heard of at Trinidad. The schooner Express came in shortly after from Trinidad, having on board the mate of the Joseph Maxwell, captured by
One hundred Dollars reward. --Ranaway from the subscriber, on the 6th instant, at Vienna, Virginia, a Mulatto Boy named Sam. Said Boy is about 20 years of age, 5 feet 5 or 6 inches high. He had on when he left a pair of white oznaburg pants and a checked shirt; no coat; is rather slow spoken; no particular marks remembered. The above reward will be given for sufficient proof to convict any white person of assisting said Boy in effecting his escape; or Twenty-five Dollars will be paid for his safe delivery either to myself or in any jail where I can get him. A. K. Tribble, au 27--1m* Of the 3d Reg't S. C. Vols.
From Havana.arrival of New Orleans vessels--Confederate flagged vessels to be admitted, &c. New York Sept. 15. --The steamship Columbia has arrived, with Havana dates to the 10th inst. Two vessels have arrived from New Orleans, having run the blockade. A British schooner had arrived from Newbern, N. C., with rice and naval stores. Confederate flagged vessels were admitted into Cuban ports and treated as those of other civilized nations.
Foreign Details by the Africa. Awful Calamity in Turin — Destructive Fire in Lenden — Public Anxiety with regard to the Cotton Supply in England, &c., &c The Cunard Steamship Africa, Capt. Shannon, which sailed from Liverpool at 3 o'clock on the afternoon of the 31st ult., and from Queenstown on the 1st inst., arrived at New York at 10 o'clock on the night of the 12th inst., bringing passengers and the European mails dated on the 31st of August. Dreadful Calamity in Turin. A letter from Turin, of the 28th of August says: A very awful calamity has befallen Turin this morning. A fire broke out in the Via diPo, which resisted for a few hours the efforts of the fire brigade, aided by the regular troops. These latter were carried away by their zeal for the public cause, and ventured into the burning buildings with a rash courage, to which about a dozen of them fell victims. Colonel Trotti, a brave Piedmontese officer; Major Fiore, of the Carabineers, and ano
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