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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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France (France) (search for this): article 3
o mob rule, and take the conduct of affairs into their own hands. Every school-boy and school-girl, every tyro in history, well knows that the sure way to conquer an invading enemy, is to exhaust it by delays. Thus was Pyrrhus and his army overcome and ruined by the Romans. Thus was Hannibal, the greatest of warriors, after many victories, repulsed from Italy, and thus did Carthage perish. A nation that invades another, if repulsed abroad, is easy to conquer at home. The citizens of France made little or no resistance to the allied armies who invaded her territory. The defence, on the first invasion, was made by the remnant of Napoleon's veteran soldiers. In the last invasion, there was no defence at all. So Carthage, powerful in offensive warfare, became cowed and subdued in spirit by her frequent defeats in Italy, and fell an easy prey to Roman armies. When Crœsus, king of Lydia, about to invade Persia, consulted the Oracle at Delphi as to his chances of success, the
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 3
ure way to conquer an invading enemy, is to exhaust it by delays. Thus was Pyrrhus and his army overcome and ruined by the Romans. Thus was Hannibal, the greatest of warriors, after many victories, repulsed from Italy, and thus did Carthage perish. A nation that invades another, if repulsed abroad, is easy to conquer at home. The citizens of France made little or no resistance to the allied armies who invaded her territory. The defence, on the first invasion, was made by the remnant of Napoleon's veteran soldiers. In the last invasion, there was no defence at all. So Carthage, powerful in offensive warfare, became cowed and subdued in spirit by her frequent defeats in Italy, and fell an easy prey to Roman armies. When Crœsus, king of Lydia, about to invade Persia, consulted the Oracle at Delphi as to his chances of success, the Priestess informed him that "if he proceeded with his undertaking; a great kingdom would be destroyed." Lydia, not Persia, was conquered. Such has b
Sevastapol (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
the same time complain that the Postmaster-General is too exacting, too formal and precise, too rigid in requiring performance of duties. In the next breath these men will probably declare that we have a first-rate Postmaster-General, and the best Secretary of War in the world; and if anybody questions it, will pounce down upon him and denounce him as a traitor to the South. Worst of all, however, in the opinion of these men, is the dilatory conduct of our officers. They could take Sevastopol with a pop gun, or storm Gibraltar with a pocket pistol: and what are Fort Pickens, and Fortress Monroe, and the broad Potomac, and Arlington Heights, and the other many fortifications around Washington, and superior numbers, and better armed men, and a powerful fleet, to men so bellicose in speech or in print. All these disadvantages and inequalities they would wipe off with a dash of the pen, or send post haste to the devil by the potency of a tremendous oath. Uncle Toby's soldiers
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 3
d precise, too rigid in requiring performance of duties. In the next breath these men will probably declare that we have a first-rate Postmaster-General, and the best Secretary of War in the world; and if anybody questions it, will pounce down upon him and denounce him as a traitor to the South. Worst of all, however, in the opinion of these men, is the dilatory conduct of our officers. They could take Sevastopol with a pop gun, or storm Gibraltar with a pocket pistol: and what are Fort Pickens, and Fortress Monroe, and the broad Potomac, and Arlington Heights, and the other many fortifications around Washington, and superior numbers, and better armed men, and a powerful fleet, to men so bellicose in speech or in print. All these disadvantages and inequalities they would wipe off with a dash of the pen, or send post haste to the devil by the potency of a tremendous oath. Uncle Toby's soldiers in Flanders didn't swear harder than they do; and after cursing our own dictatory
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
in requiring performance of duties. In the next breath these men will probably declare that we have a first-rate Postmaster-General, and the best Secretary of War in the world; and if anybody questions it, will pounce down upon him and denounce him as a traitor to the South. Worst of all, however, in the opinion of these men, is the dilatory conduct of our officers. They could take Sevastopol with a pop gun, or storm Gibraltar with a pocket pistol: and what are Fort Pickens, and Fortress Monroe, and the broad Potomac, and Arlington Heights, and the other many fortifications around Washington, and superior numbers, and better armed men, and a powerful fleet, to men so bellicose in speech or in print. All these disadvantages and inequalities they would wipe off with a dash of the pen, or send post haste to the devil by the potency of a tremendous oath. Uncle Toby's soldiers in Flanders didn't swear harder than they do; and after cursing our own dictatory army and inefficie
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 3
, our State authorities, and our Confederate Government, have zealously, patriotically, and harmoniously combined to bring about the present glorious results. We have won victory after victory, are besieging the enemy in his capital, cutting off his water communication from the North, and daily approaching and threatening to bombard Washington; Maryland, that belonged to the North, or at worst was neutral when the war began, is now ready to join us, so soon as our armies cross the Potomac; Missouri is up in arms, has checked the progress of the invader, and is fast driving him from her soil; last of all, Kentucky has raised the standard of revolt. We went into the war a few months since, without men or money, without munitions of war, or clothing or provisions for our soldiers, and with a new and but half-organized Confederate Government. As if by magic, an army of a quarter of a million, or more — well officered, well armed, well provisioned, well clothed, and well disciplined
Gibralter (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
tmaster-General is too exacting, too formal and precise, too rigid in requiring performance of duties. In the next breath these men will probably declare that we have a first-rate Postmaster-General, and the best Secretary of War in the world; and if anybody questions it, will pounce down upon him and denounce him as a traitor to the South. Worst of all, however, in the opinion of these men, is the dilatory conduct of our officers. They could take Sevastopol with a pop gun, or storm Gibraltar with a pocket pistol: and what are Fort Pickens, and Fortress Monroe, and the broad Potomac, and Arlington Heights, and the other many fortifications around Washington, and superior numbers, and better armed men, and a powerful fleet, to men so bellicose in speech or in print. All these disadvantages and inequalities they would wipe off with a dash of the pen, or send post haste to the devil by the potency of a tremendous oath. Uncle Toby's soldiers in Flanders didn't swear harder th
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 3
te Administration, the uprising of our people would have been of no avail. Our soldiers, our women, our boys, and old men; the officers of our army, our State authorities, and our Confederate Government, have zealously, patriotically, and harmoniously combined to bring about the present glorious results. We have won victory after victory, are besieging the enemy in his capital, cutting off his water communication from the North, and daily approaching and threatening to bombard Washington; Maryland, that belonged to the North, or at worst was neutral when the war began, is now ready to join us, so soon as our armies cross the Potomac; Missouri is up in arms, has checked the progress of the invader, and is fast driving him from her soil; last of all, Kentucky has raised the standard of revolt. We went into the war a few months since, without men or money, without munitions of war, or clothing or provisions for our soldiers, and with a new and but half-organized Confederate Governm
hat short time we have increased our territory one-fourth, and subjected the enemy to many disgraceful and disastrous defeats. But our brave, skillful, and able Generals, panting themselves for the battle, have restrained the ardor of their troops, pursued the Fabian, the Washingtonian, and Wellingtonian policy, and fought only when they were prepared and could fight on equal terms. Such has been the policy and practice of Beauregard, of Jolinston, of Magruder, of Lee, McCulloch, Wise, and Floyd; and our President, a distinguished scientific and practical soldier, and wise civilian, has concurred in, approved of, and directed this safe, prudent, humane, Fabian strategy. His Secretary of War, and the rest of his Cabinet, have agreed with him and were a unit on this subject. Everybody who knows anything about military affairs — everybody who is acquainted with the numbers, position, and all the surrounding circumstances of the opposing armies — speaks in terms of admiration and eulo
McCulloch (search for this): article 3
to existence. In that short time we have increased our territory one-fourth, and subjected the enemy to many disgraceful and disastrous defeats. But our brave, skillful, and able Generals, panting themselves for the battle, have restrained the ardor of their troops, pursued the Fabian, the Washingtonian, and Wellingtonian policy, and fought only when they were prepared and could fight on equal terms. Such has been the policy and practice of Beauregard, of Jolinston, of Magruder, of Lee, McCulloch, Wise, and Floyd; and our President, a distinguished scientific and practical soldier, and wise civilian, has concurred in, approved of, and directed this safe, prudent, humane, Fabian strategy. His Secretary of War, and the rest of his Cabinet, have agreed with him and were a unit on this subject. Everybody who knows anything about military affairs — everybody who is acquainted with the numbers, position, and all the surrounding circumstances of the opposing armies — speaks in terms of
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