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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 3, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 9
everything of real necessity is only to be found and only to be had in the North, and especially is this true in regard to meat stuffs. Heretofore a farmer in Tennessee, or Missouri, or Kentucky, would sell his beeves or fat hogs to the Northern speculator, who would have them slaughtered and dressed, and then sent to New York or Philadelphia; and in due course of time the meat stuff thus procured would find its way to Charleston, Savannah, &c., under the name of "prime Northern." The blockade has put a stop to this kind of traffic, and hereafter the extreme South will be supplied through the means of railways but recently completed, with meat stuffs direct from fountain sources. It will no doubt surprise many of our readers to learn that, according to the statistics of the "hog crop" of the United States as given in the census report of 1850, the Southern States, including Kentucky and Missouri, raised upwards of twenty millions of hogs against ten millions in the Yankee States.
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 9
ulators in bacon will find that as winter approaches their chances for making large profits from that source will become precarious, and that they will be obliged to betake themselves to some more honest calling if they wish to "save their bacon." For some reason unknown, the general run of people, speculators included, imagine that everything of real necessity is only to be found and only to be had in the North, and especially is this true in regard to meat stuffs. Heretofore a farmer in Tennessee, or Missouri, or Kentucky, would sell his beeves or fat hogs to the Northern speculator, who would have them slaughtered and dressed, and then sent to New York or Philadelphia; and in due course of time the meat stuff thus procured would find its way to Charleston, Savannah, &c., under the name of "prime Northern." The blockade has put a stop to this kind of traffic, and hereafter the extreme South will be supplied through the means of railways but recently completed, with meat stuffs dire
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 9
e general run of people, speculators included, imagine that everything of real necessity is only to be found and only to be had in the North, and especially is this true in regard to meat stuffs. Heretofore a farmer in Tennessee, or Missouri, or Kentucky, would sell his beeves or fat hogs to the Northern speculator, who would have them slaughtered and dressed, and then sent to New York or Philadelphia; and in due course of time the meat stuff thus procured would find its way to Charleston, Savannah, &c., under the name of "prime Northern." The blockade has put a stop to this kind of traffic, and hereafter the extreme South will be supplied through the means of railways but recently completed, with meat stuffs direct from fountain sources. It will no doubt surprise many of our readers to learn that, according to the statistics of the "hog crop" of the United States as given in the census report of 1850, the Southern States, including Kentucky and Missouri, raised upwards of twenty mil
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 9
unknown, the general run of people, speculators included, imagine that everything of real necessity is only to be found and only to be had in the North, and especially is this true in regard to meat stuffs. Heretofore a farmer in Tennessee, or Missouri, or Kentucky, would sell his beeves or fat hogs to the Northern speculator, who would have them slaughtered and dressed, and then sent to New York or Philadelphia; and in due course of time the meat stuff thus procured would find its way to Chare has put a stop to this kind of traffic, and hereafter the extreme South will be supplied through the means of railways but recently completed, with meat stuffs direct from fountain sources. It will no doubt surprise many of our readers to learn that, according to the statistics of the "hog crop" of the United States as given in the census report of 1850, the Southern States, including Kentucky and Missouri, raised upwards of twenty millions of hogs against ten millions in the Yankee States.
t everything of real necessity is only to be found and only to be had in the North, and especially is this true in regard to meat stuffs. Heretofore a farmer in Tennessee, or Missouri, or Kentucky, would sell his beeves or fat hogs to the Northern speculator, who would have them slaughtered and dressed, and then sent to New York or Philadelphia; and in due course of time the meat stuff thus procured would find its way to Charleston, Savannah, &c., under the name of "prime Northern." The blockade has put a stop to this kind of traffic, and hereafter the extreme South will be supplied through the means of railways but recently completed, with meat stuffs direct from fountain sources. It will no doubt surprise many of our readers to learn that, according to the statistics of the "hog crop" of the United States as given in the census report of 1850, the Southern States, including Kentucky and Missouri, raised upwards of twenty millions of hogs against ten millions in the Yankee States.