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North Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 3
fleet, one eighteen-pounder on land must have been more than equivalent to sixty-seven guns afloat, for the ships were so much injured as to render it necessary for them to withdraw. The British loss was twenty killed and more than fifty wounded; ours was only two killed and six wounded. The fleet sent to the attack of Baltimore, in 1814, consisted of forty sail, the largest of which were ships-of-the-line, carrying an army of over six thousand combatants. The troops were landed at North Point, while sixteen of the bomb-vessels and frigates approached within reach of Fort McHenry, and commenced a bombardment which lasted twenty-five hours. During this attack, the enemy threw "fifteen hundred shells, four hundred of which exploded within the walls of the fort, but without making any impression on either the strength of the work or the garrison," and the British were compelled to retire with much loss. In 1815, a squadron of British ships, stationed off the mouth of the Miss
Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): article 3
ey were fortified, and that the French knew how to defend their fortifications. The British maritime expeditions to Quiberon, Holland, Boulogne, the Scheldt, Constantinople, Buenos Ayres, etc., sufficiently prove the ill success and the waste of life and treasure with which they must always be attended. But when her naval power was applied to the destruction of the enemy's marine, and in transporting their land forces to solid bases of operations on the soil of her allies, in Portugal and Belgium, the fall of Napoleon crowned the glory of their achievements. Let us now examine the several British naval attacks on our own forts, in the wars of the Revolution and of 1812. In 1779, Sir Peter Parker, with a British fleet of nine vessels, carrying about two hundred and seventy guns, attacked Fort Moultre, in Charleston harbor, which was then armed with only twenty-six guns, and garrisoned only by three hundred and seventy-five regulars, and a few militia. In this contest the B
Trafalgar (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 3
is, they escaped unharmed during the entire contest.--They were frequently attacked, and in some instances the most desperate efforts were made to effect a permanent lodgement; but in no case was the success at all commensurate with the expense of life and treasure sacrificed, and no permanent hold was made on either the maritime frontiers of France or her allies. This certainly was owing to no inferiority of skill and bravery on the part of the British Navy, as the battles of Aboukir and Trafalgar, and the almost total annihilation of the French marine, have but too plainly proven. Why, then, did these places escape? We know of no other reason than that they were fortified, and that the French knew how to defend their fortifications. The British maritime expeditions to Quiberon, Holland, Boulogne, the Scheldt, Constantinople, Buenos Ayres, etc., sufficiently prove the ill success and the waste of life and treasure with which they must always be attended. But when her naval power
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
applied to the destruction of the enemy's marine, and in transporting their land forces to solid bases of operations on the soil of her allies, in Portugal and Belgium, the fall of Napoleon crowned the glory of their achievements. Let us now examine the several British naval attacks on our own forts, in the wars of the Revolution and of 1812. In 1779, Sir Peter Parker, with a British fleet of nine vessels, carrying about two hundred and seventy guns, attacked Fort Moultre, in Charleston harbor, which was then armed with only twenty-six guns, and garrisoned only by three hundred and seventy-five regulars, and a few militia. In this contest the British were entirely defeated, and lost, in killed and wounded two hundred and five men, while their whole two hundred and seventy guns killed and wounded only thirty-two men in the fort. Of this trial of strength, which was certainly a fair one, Cooper, in his Naval History says: "It goes fully to prove the important military propos
Buras (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
which were ships-of-the-line, carrying an army of over six thousand combatants. The troops were landed at North Point, while sixteen of the bomb-vessels and frigates approached within reach of Fort McHenry, and commenced a bombardment which lasted twenty-five hours. During this attack, the enemy threw "fifteen hundred shells, four hundred of which exploded within the walls of the fort, but without making any impression on either the strength of the work or the garrison," and the British were compelled to retire with much loss. In 1815, a squadron of British ships, stationed off the mouth of the Mississippi, for the purpose of a blockade, ascended the river as high as Fort St. Philip, which is a small work capable of an armament of only twenty guns in all. A heavy fire of shot and shells was continued with but few and short pauses for nine days and nights; but making no impression either on the fort or garrison, they retreated to their former position at the mouth of the river.
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 3
d that the French knew how to defend their fortifications. The British maritime expeditions to Quiberon, Holland, Boulogne, the Scheldt, Constantinople, Buenos Ayres, etc., sufficiently prove the ill success and the waste of life and treasure with which they must always be attended. But when her naval power was applied to the destruction of the enemy's marine, and in transporting their land forces to solid bases of operations on the soil of her allies, in Portugal and Belgium, the fall of Napoleon crowned the glory of their achievements. Let us now examine the several British naval attacks on our own forts, in the wars of the Revolution and of 1812. In 1779, Sir Peter Parker, with a British fleet of nine vessels, carrying about two hundred and seventy guns, attacked Fort Moultre, in Charleston harbor, which was then armed with only twenty-six guns, and garrisoned only by three hundred and seventy-five regulars, and a few militia. In this contest the British were entirely d
France (France) (search for this): article 3
of sea-coast Defences. It is unnecessary to specify examples from the wars of the French Revolution; the whole history of these wars is one continued proof of the superiority of fortifications as a maritime frontier defence. The sea-coast of France is almost within stone's throw of the principal British naval depots; here were large towns and harbors, filled with the rich commerce of the world, offering the dazzling attraction of rich booty. The French navy was at this time utterly incompenstances the most desperate efforts were made to effect a permanent lodgement; but in no case was the success at all commensurate with the expense of life and treasure sacrificed, and no permanent hold was made on either the maritime frontiers of France or her allies. This certainly was owing to no inferiority of skill and bravery on the part of the British Navy, as the battles of Aboukir and Trafalgar, and the almost total annihilation of the French marine, have but too plainly proven. Why, t
Boulogne (France) (search for this): article 3
on either the maritime frontiers of France or her allies. This certainly was owing to no inferiority of skill and bravery on the part of the British Navy, as the battles of Aboukir and Trafalgar, and the almost total annihilation of the French marine, have but too plainly proven. Why, then, did these places escape? We know of no other reason than that they were fortified, and that the French knew how to defend their fortifications. The British maritime expeditions to Quiberon, Holland, Boulogne, the Scheldt, Constantinople, Buenos Ayres, etc., sufficiently prove the ill success and the waste of life and treasure with which they must always be attended. But when her naval power was applied to the destruction of the enemy's marine, and in transporting their land forces to solid bases of operations on the soil of her allies, in Portugal and Belgium, the fall of Napoleon crowned the glory of their achievements. Let us now examine the several British naval attacks on our own fort
Buenos Ayres (Arizona, United States) (search for this): article 3
ce or her allies. This certainly was owing to no inferiority of skill and bravery on the part of the British Navy, as the battles of Aboukir and Trafalgar, and the almost total annihilation of the French marine, have but too plainly proven. Why, then, did these places escape? We know of no other reason than that they were fortified, and that the French knew how to defend their fortifications. The British maritime expeditions to Quiberon, Holland, Boulogne, the Scheldt, Constantinople, Buenos Ayres, etc., sufficiently prove the ill success and the waste of life and treasure with which they must always be attended. But when her naval power was applied to the destruction of the enemy's marine, and in transporting their land forces to solid bases of operations on the soil of her allies, in Portugal and Belgium, the fall of Napoleon crowned the glory of their achievements. Let us now examine the several British naval attacks on our own forts, in the wars of the Revolution and of 1
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): article 3
than that they were fortified, and that the French knew how to defend their fortifications. The British maritime expeditions to Quiberon, Holland, Boulogne, the Scheldt, Constantinople, Buenos Ayres, etc., sufficiently prove the ill success and the waste of life and treasure with which they must always be attended. But when her naval power was applied to the destruction of the enemy's marine, and in transporting their land forces to solid bases of operations on the soil of her allies, in Portugal and Belgium, the fall of Napoleon crowned the glory of their achievements. Let us now examine the several British naval attacks on our own forts, in the wars of the Revolution and of 1812. In 1779, Sir Peter Parker, with a British fleet of nine vessels, carrying about two hundred and seventy guns, attacked Fort Moultre, in Charleston harbor, which was then armed with only twenty-six guns, and garrisoned only by three hundred and seventy-five regulars, and a few militia. In this c
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