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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 16, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Pound Ridge (New York, United States) (search for this): article 6
dea was warmly seconded, resolutions were passed highly complimentary to Crawford, and subscriptions begun. This testimonial of artists to an artist was, he said, more than empty compliment. In the speaker's opinion, Crawford's Indian surpassed in bold originality all other works of the kind. Unfortunately, the committee of artists could not find a place to be given them by the present dynasty that would in any manner be suitable to the work. The statues on exhibition are the Indian lamenting the downfall of his race; the Hunter Boy, Adam and Eve, the Boy playing marbles, and the Peri, represented in Moore's poem as waiting at the gates of Paradise. The paper of the evening was "The Surprise and Capture of Pound ridge, Westchester county, on the second of July, 1779, by Lieutenant Colonel Tarleton, with a biographical sketch of that officer," by John M. McDonald, Esq., of Flushing. It was read by the Librarian, Mr. Moore, and frequently applauded.--N. Y. Tribune, Oct. 3d.
Flushing, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 6
idea was warmly seconded, resolutions were passed highly complimentary to Crawford, and subscriptions begun. This testimonial of artists to an artist was, he said, more than empty compliment. In the speaker's opinion, Crawford's Indian surpassed in bold originality all other works of the kind. Unfortunately, the committee of artists could not find a place to be given them by the present dynasty that would in any manner be suitable to the work. The statues on exhibition are the Indian lamenting the downfall of his race; the Hunter Boy, Adam and Eve, the Boy playing marbles, and the Peri, represented in Moore's poem as waiting at the gates of Paradise. The paper of the evening was "The Surprise and Capture of Pound ridge, Westchester county, on the second of July, 1779, by Lieutenant Colonel Tarleton, with a biographical sketch of that officer," by John M. McDonald, Esq., of Flushing. It was read by the Librarian, Mr. Moore, and frequently applauded.--N. Y. Tribune, Oct. 3d.
Westchester (New York, United States) (search for this): article 6
idea was warmly seconded, resolutions were passed highly complimentary to Crawford, and subscriptions begun. This testimonial of artists to an artist was, he said, more than empty compliment. In the speaker's opinion, Crawford's Indian surpassed in bold originality all other works of the kind. Unfortunately, the committee of artists could not find a place to be given them by the present dynasty that would in any manner be suitable to the work. The statues on exhibition are the Indian lamenting the downfall of his race; the Hunter Boy, Adam and Eve, the Boy playing marbles, and the Peri, represented in Moore's poem as waiting at the gates of Paradise. The paper of the evening was "The Surprise and Capture of Pound ridge, Westchester county, on the second of July, 1779, by Lieutenant Colonel Tarleton, with a biographical sketch of that officer," by John M. McDonald, Esq., of Flushing. It was read by the Librarian, Mr. Moore, and frequently applauded.--N. Y. Tribune, Oct. 3d.
George H. Moore (search for this): article 6
ome.--The monthly meeting of the Historical Society on Tuesday night was an interesting one, and exceedingly well attended. The Hon. Luther Brodish presided. George H. Moore, Esq., the Librarian, presented a report, from which it appears that the number of donations to the Society during the summer has been quite large. A long li The statues on exhibition are the Indian lamenting the downfall of his race; the Hunter Boy, Adam and Eve, the Boy playing marbles, and the Peri, represented in Moore's poem as waiting at the gates of Paradise. The paper of the evening was "The Surprise and Capture of Pound ridge, Westchester county, on the second of July, 1779 The paper of the evening was "The Surprise and Capture of Pound ridge, Westchester county, on the second of July, 1779, by Lieutenant Colonel Tarleton, with a biographical sketch of that officer," by John M. McDonald, Esq., of Flushing. It was read by the Librarian, Mr. Moore, and frequently applauded.--N. Y. Tribune, Oct. 3d.
John Ward (search for this): article 6
Schell, reported names for membership. Mr. Bradish then announced that a collection of statuary just from Rome, the last works of the late sculptor Crawford, which have been deposited with the Society by his widow, through the agency of Mr. John Ward, was on exhibition in the library.--Among the miscellaneous business a vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Ward. Mr. Thompson, the artist from Rome, now on a visit here, stated that a meeting of artists had been held in Rome, at which Mr. GibsonMr. Ward. Mr. Thompson, the artist from Rome, now on a visit here, stated that a meeting of artists had been held in Rome, at which Mr. Gibson, a leading English artist, proposed that the last work of Crawford, the Indian, should be cast in bronze and erected in one of the leading squares of Rome. The idea was warmly seconded, resolutions were passed highly complimentary to Crawford, and subscriptions begun. This testimonial of artists to an artist was, he said, more than empty compliment. In the speaker's opinion, Crawford's Indian surpassed in bold originality all other works of the kind. Unfortunately, the committee of artists
John M. McDonald (search for this): article 6
idea was warmly seconded, resolutions were passed highly complimentary to Crawford, and subscriptions begun. This testimonial of artists to an artist was, he said, more than empty compliment. In the speaker's opinion, Crawford's Indian surpassed in bold originality all other works of the kind. Unfortunately, the committee of artists could not find a place to be given them by the present dynasty that would in any manner be suitable to the work. The statues on exhibition are the Indian lamenting the downfall of his race; the Hunter Boy, Adam and Eve, the Boy playing marbles, and the Peri, represented in Moore's poem as waiting at the gates of Paradise. The paper of the evening was "The Surprise and Capture of Pound ridge, Westchester county, on the second of July, 1779, by Lieutenant Colonel Tarleton, with a biographical sketch of that officer," by John M. McDonald, Esq., of Flushing. It was read by the Librarian, Mr. Moore, and frequently applauded.--N. Y. Tribune, Oct. 3d.
he Historical Society on Tuesday night was an interesting one, and exceedingly well attended. The Hon. Luther Brodish presided. George H. Moore, Esq., the Librarian, presented a report, from which it appears that the number of donations to the Society during the summer has been quite large. A long list was read, comprising a valuable collection of manuscripts, books, works of art, etc. The Chairman of the Executive Committee, the Hon. Augustus Schell, reported names for membership. Mr. Bradish then announced that a collection of statuary just from Rome, the last works of the late sculptor Crawford, which have been deposited with the Society by his widow, through the agency of Mr. John Ward, was on exhibition in the library.--Among the miscellaneous business a vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Ward. Mr. Thompson, the artist from Rome, now on a visit here, stated that a meeting of artists had been held in Rome, at which Mr. Gibson, a leading English artist, proposed that the last
Luther Brodish (search for this): article 6
Historical Society --Exhibition of Valuable Statuary from Rome.--The monthly meeting of the Historical Society on Tuesday night was an interesting one, and exceedingly well attended. The Hon. Luther Brodish presided. George H. Moore, Esq., the Librarian, presented a report, from which it appears that the number of donations to the Society during the summer has been quite large. A long list was read, comprising a valuable collection of manuscripts, books, works of art, etc. The Chairman of the Executive Committee, the Hon. Augustus Schell, reported names for membership. Mr. Bradish then announced that a collection of statuary just from Rome, the last works of the late sculptor Crawford, which have been deposited with the Society by his widow, through the agency of Mr. John Ward, was on exhibition in the library.--Among the miscellaneous business a vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Ward. Mr. Thompson, the artist from Rome, now on a visit here, stated that a meeting of artist
gustus Schell, reported names for membership. Mr. Bradish then announced that a collection of statuary just from Rome, the last works of the late sculptor Crawford, which have been deposited with the Society by his widow, through the agency of Mr. John Ward, was on exhibition in the library.--Among the miscellaneous business a vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Ward. Mr. Thompson, the artist from Rome, now on a visit here, stated that a meeting of artists had been held in Rome, at which Mr. Gibson, a leading English artist, proposed that the last work of Crawford, the Indian, should be cast in bronze and erected in one of the leading squares of Rome. The idea was warmly seconded, resolutions were passed highly complimentary to Crawford, and subscriptions begun. This testimonial of artists to an artist was, he said, more than empty compliment. In the speaker's opinion, Crawford's Indian surpassed in bold originality all other works of the kind. Unfortunately, the committee of art
rship. Mr. Bradish then announced that a collection of statuary just from Rome, the last works of the late sculptor Crawford, which have been deposited with the Society by his widow, through the agency of Mr. John Ward, was on exhibition in the meeting of artists had been held in Rome, at which Mr. Gibson, a leading English artist, proposed that the last work of Crawford, the Indian, should be cast in bronze and erected in one of the leading squares of Rome. The idea was warmly seconded, resolutions were passed highly complimentary to Crawford, and subscriptions begun. This testimonial of artists to an artist was, he said, more than empty compliment. In the speaker's opinion, Crawford's Indian surpassed in bold originality all otheCrawford's Indian surpassed in bold originality all other works of the kind. Unfortunately, the committee of artists could not find a place to be given them by the present dynasty that would in any manner be suitable to the work. The statues on exhibition are the Indian lamenting the downfall of his
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