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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 21, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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to $1,441,767,430 in the present year of war — an augmentation of very nearly $22,500,000. The city of New York gains by a very much larger ratio; the valuation in 1860 being $550,078,788, and in 1861 rising to $571,078,798, a gain of $21,000,000. In fact, the additional valuation may be said to fall bodily upon the city. The tax for 1860 was 3-5-6 mills, amounting in the aggregate to $5,440,610.49. The city firemen are making preparations for a grand tournament on Thanksgiving Day. The whole department will take part, and the spectacle, it is expected, will be one of the most exciting ever witnessed in this city. Instead of having the Union tica Colonization Society considers the practicability of the removal of the colored race from America to Africa. We make the following extract: The census of 1860 gives the number of free colored persons at 499,709, and slaves at 3,972,343, making a total of 4,440,052. By the official returns obtained from the State Departm
New York. The following is a summary of news from New York up to the 4th inst: The amount of the taxable property of the State has just been determined by the board of equalization. The board has advanced the aggregate valuation from $1,419,297,560, the figure for the last year of peace, to $1,441,767,430 in the present year of war — an augmentation of very nearly $22,500,000. The city of New York gains by a very much larger ratio; the valuation in 1860 being $550,078,788, and in 1861 rising to $571,078,798, a gain of $21,000,000. In fact, the additional valuation may be said to fall bodily upon the city. The tax for 1860 was 3-5-6 mills, amounting in the aggregate to $5,440,610.49. The city firemen are making preparations for a grand tournament on Thanksgiving Day. The whole department will take part, and the spectacle, it is expected, will be one of the most exciting ever witnessed in this city. Instead of having the Union ticket before the people at the comin
McClellan (search for this): article 2
y's scattering pickets only being visible in the distance. Gen. McClellan returned yesterday afternoon from the other side of the river. the forenoon, as caused dispatches to be sent here that induced Gen. McClellan to hasten over there some what earlier in the day than usual. bye, remained Saturday night over the river with the staff of General McClellan, at Smoot's house, a point between Lewinsville and Prospect hill. We hear that General McClellan, at 2 A. M. yesterday morning, telegraphed to the President that B. seemed disposed to open the balle of the enemy's scouts will venture upon it. Its occupation by Gen. McClellan, as explained above, is equivalent to a forward movement of his advance of perhaps two miles. At one time yesterday forenoon Gens. McClellan, Barry, Stoneman, Fitz. John Porter, Butterfield, and Morell--sUmpqua, and Scranton. Capt. McMahon, recently appointed on Gen. McClellan's staff, started for Washington, overland, on the 6th inst.
hooner San Juan, which was captured off Hatteras Inlet on the 28th of September, by the U. S. frigate Susquehanna, arrived on Friday night, in charge of prize master Wm. U. Grozier. The schooner is about 130 tons burthen and is loaded chiefly with salt. She was from one of the West India Islands, and was bound to Elizabeth, N. C. Her owner is of that State. Additional from California. Pacific Springs, Oct. 12. --The pony express, going east, passed here this morning. Gen. Sumner has issued his proclamation, ordering the manning of the forts in the department of California, by volunteers, and concentrating the regulars at convenient points for their embarkation for Panama.--Lieutenant Colonel Merchant will detail four companies, of twenty men each, from his regiment, to garrison Forts Churchill, Humboldt, Bragg, Crook, Gaston, Umpqua, and Scranton. Capt. McMahon, recently appointed on Gen. McClellan's staff, started for Washington, overland, on the 6th inst.
Heintzelman (search for this): article 2
Mr. Russell's first letter-concerning the battle of Bull Run were subsequently softened down, still they went where corrections never reach, and on the whole, our military, as well as our institutions, are much of a laughing stock. --The editorials of the Times contribute to the same end, and, unless the press of Continental Europe have correspondents of their own in this country, we shall only be seen through the medium of John Bullism. Report gives the name of Generals McDowell, Heintzelman, and Stone, as officers who are to have corps d'armce commands. The necessity of such organization is attested by general European practice, and should the war continue, appropriate rank will doubtless be authorized. In the Confederate army the highest grade is General. So here we may adopt the same title, giving that of Lieutenant General to commanders of corps d'armce. The session of the city council this evening attracts visitors, as the resolution passed by the aldermen for go
y a commencement was made in the work of clearing Minor's hill of possible future cover for an attacking force. By the time we go to press to-day it will have been finished, and an Union force so posted upon it that no more of the enemy's scouts will venture upon it. Its occupation by Gen. McClellan, as explained above, is equivalent to a forward movement of his advance of perhaps two miles. At one time yesterday forenoon Gens. McClellan, Barry, Stoneman, Fitz. John Porter, Butterfield, and Morell--six general officers--were together on that hill. From Fortress Monroe. Fortress Monroe, Oct. 15. --Twelve of the New York Zouave regiment were yesterday taken by the rebels a short distance above Newport News. Lieut. Geller, who was in command of the party in quest of fuel, is under arrest for cowardly behavior. The frigate Susquehanna will sail for the blockade off Savannah on Tuesday. Army movements — the supply of Clothing to the troops, &C. Washington, O
shington correspondent of the Springfield Republican writes as follows: Mrs. Lincoln is a very active woman.--Nothing escapes her eye. She manages the affairs of the White House (I do not mean State affairs) with ability, and will see to it that the "old man" does not return to Springfield penniless. In foreign countries her turn for politics would not subject her to adverse criticism; but the American people are so unused to these things, that it is not easy for them to like it. Mrs. Douglas was a good deal of a politician, but rather improved it by her social alliances. Miss Lane never alluded to politics, and Mrs. Pierce knew nothing about them. She was probably the most simple-hearted woman that ever presided at the Presidential table. The word "simple" is not used in a depreciative sense. She was a pure-minded, unselfish, Christian woman, and knew nothing at all of the world. A concert at Gen. Banks's headquarters. A correspondent of the Worcester Spy, wri
o this city, a minor, was brought before Judge Merrick to-day, on an application to be discharged from Col. Tait's First District regiment. The decision of the Court was that there was strong circumstantial evidence that the petitioner enlisted with the consent of his parents, and the application was accordingly refused. The war in Missouri. Syracuse, Mo., Oct. 13. --Letters from rebels in General Price's army have been intercepted and brought here. They are dated the 9th instant, and represent that Price and his army was within ten miles of the Osage river, near Papensville, and that he has 2,000 wagons, 16,000 horses, and from 18,000 to 20,000 men. St. Louis, Oct. 13.--In the Convention, yesterday, Mr. Hendricks, from the Committee on Elections, introduced a bill to postpone the State election till the first Monday in August, 1862, and providing for the continuance of the present provisional Governor, Lieutenant Governor and Secretary of State in office ti
woods. In the course of the day yesterday a commencement was made in the work of clearing Minor's hill of possible future cover for an attacking force. By the time we go to press to-day it will have been finished, and an Union force so posted upon it that no more of the enemy's scouts will venture upon it. Its occupation by Gen. McClellan, as explained above, is equivalent to a forward movement of his advance of perhaps two miles. At one time yesterday forenoon Gens. McClellan, Barry, Stoneman, Fitz. John Porter, Butterfield, and Morell--six general officers--were together on that hill. From Fortress Monroe. Fortress Monroe, Oct. 15. --Twelve of the New York Zouave regiment were yesterday taken by the rebels a short distance above Newport News. Lieut. Geller, who was in command of the party in quest of fuel, is under arrest for cowardly behavior. The frigate Susquehanna will sail for the blockade off Savannah on Tuesday. Army movements — the supply of
Confederate battery--Premature Reports of a movement of General Banks's division — the war in Missouri--a skirmish in Western pilot, stood on up the bay towards Baltimore. From Gen. Banks's division. Darnestown, Oct. 12. --A general co press to-day a story floats over the city, saying that Gen. Banks threw fifteen thousand and yesterday eleven thousand troline of the Potomac — Premature Reports of a movement of Gen. Banks's division. Washington, Oct. 14. --The rebels, Reports have been current for several days past that Gen. Banks has crossed the Potomac, and even hard fighting is rumord knew nothing at all of the world. A concert at Gen. Banks's headquarters. A correspondent of the Worcester Spynarrates an evening's experience at the headquarters of General Banks: "It was dark when we reached General Banks's quGeneral Banks's quarters. We found him at his tents, where the time was passed very agreeably until half-past 9 o'clock. For an hour or more,
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