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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 23, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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October 19th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 2
The fight at Harper's Ferry.[Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Charlestown, Jefferson Co., Va., October 19th, 1861. The anniversary of the attack on Harper's Ferry, by old Ossawattomic Brown, which may be said to be the beginning of this terrible war, in which we are now engaged, was celebrated on Tuesday last (the 16th) by a very spirited fight, between Col. Ash by and those under his command, numbering about 500, and a body of Federalists, supposed to be 1,000 strong. As I told you in a former letter, the enemy had taken possession of a hill two miles this side of the Ferry, upon which they had erected fortifications. Col. Ash by having received information, through a courier, that a considerable force, with several pieces of cannon, would march from Leesburg and take possession of the Loudoun heights, in order to assist him in driving the enemy from their stronghold, made preparations to commence the attack on this side of the town. These intentions becoming g
The anniversary of the attack on Harper's Ferry, by old Ossawattomic Brown, which may be said to be the beginning of this terrible war, in which we are now engaged, was celebrated on Tuesday last (the 16th) by a very spirited fight, between Col. Ash by and those under his command, numbering about 500, and a body of Federalists, supposed to be 1,000 strong. As I told you in a former letter, the enemy had taken possession of a hill two miles this side of the Ferry, upon which they had erected fortifications. Col. Ash by having received information, through a courier, that a considerable force, with several pieces of cannon, would march from Leesburg and take possession of the Loudoun heights, in order to assist him in driving the enemy from their stronghold, made preparations to commence the attack on this side of the town. These intentions becoming generally known, every one was on the qui and between seven and eight o'clock on Tuesday morning, a rapid discharge of musketry
E. L. Moore (search for this): article 2
ver, when it was ascertained that he was a prisoner, but unhurt. He is a true-hearted Southerner and will not conceal his sentiments even to procure his release; but I hope that after examining his case, and finding him a non-combatant, they will have the magnanimity to release him without insulting him by requiring him to take the oath of allegiance. There is one who was engaged in this fight and was desperately wounded, who deserves special mention. John. T. Beale, a member of Captain E. L. Moore's company, from this place, has been faithfully serving his country ever since the beginning of the war, and had returned the evening before on a visit to his home for the purpose of recruiting his health; but hearing of the movement contemplated, he unhesitatingly offered his services, and was, by one of those mysterious acts of Providence, cut down in the midst of his usefulness. We sincerely trust that his wound will not prove fatal. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon ou
Jefferson Lady (search for this): article 2
ounded, who deserves special mention. John. T. Beale, a member of Captain E. L. Moore's company, from this place, has been faithfully serving his country ever since the beginning of the war, and had returned the evening before on a visit to his home for the purpose of recruiting his health; but hearing of the movement contemplated, he unhesitatingly offered his services, and was, by one of those mysterious acts of Providence, cut down in the midst of his usefulness. We sincerely trust that his wound will not prove fatal. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon our officers and men, and in the name of the ladies I return them thanks for the noble manner in which they have sustained the honor of the service, and for the energy and determination they have shown in our defence. The fate of Harper's Ferry is sealed, and before many days it will be a heap of smouldering ruins, and there will be very few in this county who will not rejoice over its destruction. A Jefferson Lady.
Ossawattomic Brown (search for this): article 2
The fight at Harper's Ferry.[Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Charlestown, Jefferson Co., Va., October 19th, 1861. The anniversary of the attack on Harper's Ferry, by old Ossawattomic Brown, which may be said to be the beginning of this terrible war, in which we are now engaged, was celebrated on Tuesday last (the 16th) by a very spirited fight, between Col. Ash by and those under his command, numbering about 500, and a body of Federalists, supposed to be 1,000 strong. As I told you in a former letter, the enemy had taken possession of a hill two miles this side of the Ferry, upon which they had erected fortifications. Col. Ash by having received information, through a courier, that a considerable force, with several pieces of cannon, would march from Leesburg and take possession of the Loudoun heights, in order to assist him in driving the enemy from their stronghold, made preparations to commence the attack on this side of the town. These intentions becoming ge
Green North (search for this): article 2
ve the facts as I heard them from others; and as each gave a different version of the affair, it was with difficulty that I was enabled to get as near the truth as I think I have done. We had one man killed and nine wounded All of the latter, including one Yankee, were brought to this place, where they are being kindly cared for, and every effort made to alleviate their sufferings. The loss of the Federalists it is impossible to estimate accurately, but we hear it was heavy. The Rev. Green North is a prisoner in the hands of the enemy. His non-appearance on the evening of the fight and the return of his horse badly wounded, caused his friends great anxiety, and early the following morning a flag of truce was sent over the river, when it was ascertained that he was a prisoner, but unhurt. He is a true-hearted Southerner and will not conceal his sentiments even to procure his release; but I hope that after examining his case, and finding him a non-combatant, they will have th
f truce was sent over the river, when it was ascertained that he was a prisoner, but unhurt. He is a true-hearted Southerner and will not conceal his sentiments even to procure his release; but I hope that after examining his case, and finding him a non-combatant, they will have the magnanimity to release him without insulting him by requiring him to take the oath of allegiance. There is one who was engaged in this fight and was desperately wounded, who deserves special mention. John. T. Beale, a member of Captain E. L. Moore's company, from this place, has been faithfully serving his country ever since the beginning of the war, and had returned the evening before on a visit to his home for the purpose of recruiting his health; but hearing of the movement contemplated, he unhesitatingly offered his services, and was, by one of those mysterious acts of Providence, cut down in the midst of his usefulness. We sincerely trust that his wound will not prove fatal. Too much praise
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
The fight at Harper's Ferry.[Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Charlestown, Jefferson Co., Va., October 19th, 1861. The anniversary of the attack on Harper's Ferry, by old Ossawattomic Brown, which may be said to be the beginning of this terrible war, in which we are now engaged, was celebrated on Tuesday last (Harper's Ferry, by old Ossawattomic Brown, which may be said to be the beginning of this terrible war, in which we are now engaged, was celebrated on Tuesday last (the 16th) by a very spirited fight, between Col. Ash by and those under his command, numbering about 500, and a body of Federalists, supposed to be 1,000 strong. As I told you in a former letter, the enemy had taken possession of a hill two miles this side of the Ferry, upon which they had erected fortifications. Col. Ash by havr the noble manner in which they have sustained the honor of the service, and for the energy and determination they have shown in our defence. The fate of Harper's Ferry is sealed, and before many days it will be a heap of smouldering ruins, and there will be very few in this county who will not rejoice over its destruction.
September 26th (search for this): article 3
The enemy in the Virginia Mountains. --The campaign in the Virginia mountains has been one of great discomfort and suffering to both armies. A correspondent of the Cincinnati Times gives a terrible picture of the suffering in the Northern camp, particularly on the night of the 26th of September, when a terrible rain storm burst upon the army. Two regiments were exposed to it without any shelter. "The stoutest men fell completely exhausted by the rains and blasting winds. Hundreds were struck down by the chills. The fort and all the reliable places of shelter were filled with the sick. The horses suffered fully as badly as the men. "The weather grew colder during the night. "A number of stragglers were found unable to walk, and were brought into camp. "I wished that the whole country could look down upon that scene last night, and feel the piercing winds as they shivered the half-clothed almost dying troops. Scores perish here, not by the bullets of the enemy,
C. C. Lee (search for this): article 3
number of stragglers were found unable to walk, and were brought into camp. "I wished that the whole country could look down upon that scene last night, and feel the piercing winds as they shivered the half-clothed almost dying troops. Scores perish here, not by the bullets of the enemy, but by the mismanagement of the War Department, and — excuse the truth — the negligence of those at home. "Only one death is known. "Some ten or fifteen horses were found dead this morning and others in a dying condition. "The road down the mountain is badly cut by the torrents, and the telegraph is prostrated. "The sick — and there are many of them — are immediately attended to. "Day before yesterday, the 12th Indiana and 6th Ohio marched towards Lee's camp for the purpose of making a reconnaissance, but after they had left, the storm I have described set in, and as the 6th Ohio was without overcoats, and many with ragged breeches, I fear they have suffered seve
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