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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 23, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
hear be true, are a good many more than are required to establish a general rule. We have referred to this subject again and again, and, in the name of humanity, of civilization, of duty to the people of this Republic, we invoke the proper authorities to investigate this matter and have these alleged abuses probed to the bottom. But who are the "proper authorities?" We don't know; but knowing that the military, as well as the civil, head of the Government is the President of the Confederate States, we invoke him to direct an investigation of a subject which vitally concerns the efficiency of the army and the character of the Southern people. If the accusations of neglect, inefficiency, incompetent medical attendance, privation of food, exposure to weather which no one would expose a sick dog to, and other such occasional, and perhaps exceptional, examples, are true, they are a disgrace to the nineteenth century; if false, then let their falsity be shown, and the public mind wil
She is by Red Eye, out of a Margrave. Our redders, however, have seen her pedigree and performances too often for them to need repetition. She ran close up in the two-mile match at Fairfield, in which Exchequer beat her in 3142--342½. If not this male, Mr. Fondren will probably enter Red Eagle, a superb looking bay, full brother to Leisure, and one, we understand, that has proved a remarkably fast horse. It his action corresponds to his appearance, it must be a treat to see him move. Buck-Eye is, we hear, quite a noted Virginia horse; but we do not know his pedigree or to whom he belongs. He is counted a good one, at any rate. Exchequer is full brother to Planet and Ninette. He is a dark chestnut four years old, a little coarse in appearance, but by many thought to be the horse of the best bone in America. We like him much, though his racing career has been very chequered. He has beaten some tip-top horses, and been beaten by some inferior lots. He has made most exce
ay there will be a two-mile purse face, open for all ages. Let us state who these noble rivals are: Friday's race. Beauregard.--This fine, large bay colt was bred in North Carolina by Colonel Green of that State, and is partly owned by Col. Hare, who has trained him His name was changed some weeks before his recent successful race, Col. Hare believing that Beauregard would prove invincible. He is by Hawkins's Priam, out of a Trustee mare, and is a fine-looking and fine-moving horse, oCol. Hare believing that Beauregard would prove invincible. He is by Hawkins's Priam, out of a Trustee mare, and is a fine-looking and fine-moving horse, of a most remarkable turn of speed. We have seldom seen a racehorse which, at the last moment, could so suddenly make up a gap. His rush at Ninette, at the finish of the fast heat of the New Market race, was a splendid thing. He and the other horses in this face are, of course, three years old. Ninette, belonging to Messrs. T. & T. W. Doswell, is a bay, of excellent form, though a little under size at first glance. There is more of her, however, than the casual observer would think. Her
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
w Market will reappear; and on Saturday there will be a two-mile purse face, open for all ages. Let us state who these noble rivals are: Friday's race. Beauregard.--This fine, large bay colt was bred in North Carolina by Colonel Green of that State, and is partly owned by Col. Hare, who has trained him His name was changed some weeks before his recent successful race, Col. Hare believing that Beauregard would prove invincible. He is by Hawkins's Priam, out of a Trustee mare, and is a fine-looking and fine-moving horse, of a most remarkable turn of speed. We have seldom seen a racehorse which, at the last moment, could so suddenly make up a gap. her of Planet, to whom Ninette is full sister. Nor is the filly a feeble representative of Revenue and Nina. She has won many races, having foretime conquered Beauregard when he bore another name. McDaniel's bay colt has not been named, we believe He is a clever son of Revenue and Die Clapperion, and we think he will prove
ats, on Friday, in which the contestants at New Market will reappear; and on Saturday there will be a two-mile purse face, open for all ages. Let us state who these noble rivals are: Friday's race. Beauregard.--This fine, large bay colt was bred in North Carolina by Colonel Green of that State, and is partly owned by Col. Hare, who has trained him His name was changed some weeks before his recent successful race, Col. Hare believing that Beauregard would prove invincible. He is by Hawkins's Priam, out of a Trustee mare, and is a fine-looking and fine-moving horse, of a most remarkable turn of speed. We have seldom seen a racehorse which, at the last moment, could so suddenly make up a gap. His rush at Ninette, at the finish of the fast heat of the New Market race, was a splendid thing. He and the other horses in this face are, of course, three years old. Ninette, belonging to Messrs. T. & T. W. Doswell, is a bay, of excellent form, though a little under size at first
S. S. Green (search for this): article 1
The horses that will run on next Friday and Saturday. --The race at Fairfield, next Friday and Saturday, will bring out some of the best blood of the country. There is to be a colt race, at two-mile beats, on Friday, in which the contestants at New Market will reappear; and on Saturday there will be a two-mile purse face, open for all ages. Let us state who these noble rivals are: Friday's race. Beauregard.--This fine, large bay colt was bred in North Carolina by Colonel Green of that State, and is partly owned by Col. Hare, who has trained him His name was changed some weeks before his recent successful race, Col. Hare believing that Beauregard would prove invincible. He is by Hawkins's Priam, out of a Trustee mare, and is a fine-looking and fine-moving horse, of a most remarkable turn of speed. We have seldom seen a racehorse which, at the last moment, could so suddenly make up a gap. His rush at Ninette, at the finish of the fast heat of the New Market race, was a
mbed especially. If more than two heats are run on Friday, it is no sure thing that he does not show more perseverance man the rest of the party. Ninette beat him, also, last year, at mile heats. Saturday's race. Leisure belongs to Mr. Fondren, and will probably represent his stable in the race.--She is a fine large, four year-old, with some remarkably good points — her arm, for instance. She is by Red Eye, out of a Margrave. Our redders, however, have seen her pedigree and performances too often for them to need repetition. She ran close up in the two-mile match at Fairfield, in which Exchequer beat her in 3142--342½. If not this male, Mr. Fondren will probably enter Red Eagle, a superb looking bay, full brother to Leisure, and one, we understand, that has proved a remarkably fast horse. It his action corresponds to his appearance, it must be a treat to see him move. Buck-Eye is, we hear, quite a noted Virginia horse; but we do not know his pedigree or to whom
T. W. Doswell (search for this): article 1
Col. Hare believing that Beauregard would prove invincible. He is by Hawkins's Priam, out of a Trustee mare, and is a fine-looking and fine-moving horse, of a most remarkable turn of speed. We have seldom seen a racehorse which, at the last moment, could so suddenly make up a gap. His rush at Ninette, at the finish of the fast heat of the New Market race, was a splendid thing. He and the other horses in this face are, of course, three years old. Ninette, belonging to Messrs. T. & T. W. Doswell, is a bay, of excellent form, though a little under size at first glance. There is more of her, however, than the casual observer would think. Her muscles are remarkably large, and she is not deficient in bone. Her conformation is strikingly like that of her dam, glorious old Nina, the mother of Planet, to whom Ninette is full sister. Nor is the filly a feeble representative of Revenue and Nina. She has won many races, having foretime conquered Beauregard when he bore another name.
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
The horses that will run on next Friday and Saturday. --The race at Fairfield, next Friday and Saturday, will bring out some of the best blood of the country. There is to be a colt race, at two-mile beats, on Friday, in which the contestants at New Market will reappear; and on Saturday there will be a two-mile purse face, open for all ages. Let us state who these noble rivals are: Friday's race. Beauregard.--This fine, large bay colt was bred in North Carolina by Colonel Green of that State, and is partly owned by Col. Hare, who has trained him His name was changed some weeks before his recent successful race, Col. Hare believing that Beauregard would prove invincible. He is by Hawkins's Priam, out of a Trustee mare, and is a fine-looking and fine-moving horse, of a most remarkable turn of speed. We have seldom seen a racehorse which, at the last moment, could so suddenly make up a gap. His rush at Ninette, at the finish of the fast heat of the New Market race, was a
Ninette (Canada) (search for this): article 1
ine, large bay colt was bred in North Carolina by Colonel Green of that State, and is partly owned by Col. Hare, who has trained him His name was changed some weeks before his recent successful race, Col. Hare believing that Beauregard would prove invincible. He is by Hawkins's Priam, out of a Trustee mare, and is a fine-looking and fine-moving horse, of a most remarkable turn of speed. We have seldom seen a racehorse which, at the last moment, could so suddenly make up a gap. His rush at Ninette, at the finish of the fast heat of the New Market race, was a splendid thing. He and the other horses in this face are, of course, three years old. Ninette, belonging to Messrs. T. & T. W. Doswell, is a bay, of excellent form, though a little under size at first glance. There is more of her, however, than the casual observer would think. Her muscles are remarkably large, and she is not deficient in bone. Her conformation is strikingly like that of her dam, glorious old Nina, the mo
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