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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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bvre, of this city, as passengers, were held prisoners on board the South Carolina, where they found Buttendorf and Fernandez, who were passengers on board the Isalda, captured by the South Carolina on the 30th of September. This schooner was a returning prize of the Sumter, and Lieut. Hicks, of the Sumter, and a prize crew were aboard, and taken prisoners. The English schooner Edward Bernard, Captain Watson, who had left Mobile on the 13th with a cargo of turpentine, was captured on the 15th, at 10 o'clock A. M., between Pass a Loutre and the Sound, thirty miles from land. The master and Captain Wright, who was aboard, and all the crew were made prisoners. The Joseph H. Toone had a cargo of arms and munitions of war valued at $10,000, that would have been worth four or five times that amount had she run safely into Barataria. Dr. Lefebvre had nothing on board under his name, and was fortunately provided with a French passport and French patents. So when he was informed th
taking ninety prisoners and a large number of horses. Capture by a privateer — the Brig Granada taken by the Sallie. From the New York Post, of the 24th of October, we take the following: The brig Granada, Captain Pettingill, from Nuevitas to New York, was taken as a prize by the privateer Sallie, off Charleston, on the 13th inst., in latitude 33, longitude 71, at midnight. The captain, second mate and two seamen of the Granada, were taken on board the privateer, and on the 15th, in latitude 29, longitude 70, were transferred to the British schooner Greyhound, Captain Gamage, from St. Domingo city, and brought to this port.--Mr. Russell Butterfield, the first officer of the brig, was detained on board the vessel to navigate her into Charleston or Savannah. The cook — a white man-- and one of the seamen volunteered on board the privateer. The Granada had a cargo of 400 hogsheads of sugar, melado and molasses, and a quantity of cedar, and was consigned to Messrs.
Pacific with the Atlantic! May the prosperity of both cities be increased thereby, and the projectors of this important work meet with honor and reward. [Signed] H. F. Teschemaker, Mayor of San Francisco. Latest from Fort Pickens. New York, Oct. 25--Mr. Packhard, a native of Maine, and a fugitive from Florida, who arrived here by the steamer McClellan, communicates the fact that Col. Brown had made all his arrangements to open the batteries of Fort Pickens upon Pensacola on the 16th, but was prevented by the affair at the mouth of the Mississippi, which rendered it necessary that two ships which were to have taken part in the action should go to the aid of the fleet there. Probable release of three more prisoners from Fort Lafayette. The New York Tribunes, Oct. 25, has the following paragraph: One of the Deputy U. S. Marshals went down to Fort Lafayette yesterday afternoon, with the necessary documents, offering the opening of the prison doors to three of
killed by these Union-loving people. On Sunday, the 20th inst., the General came to a halt, finding the road completely blockaded by the falling timber. He sent out scouts, who reported the enemy, some three or four thousand strong, in their breastworks, some three miles off. He immediately commenced clearing the road, no sooner than which he was fired upon by the enemy concealed in the adjoining brush. This mode of operation was kept up all Sabbath, and until 8 or 9 o'clock on Monday, the 21st, when he advanced upon the enemy's breastworks, and commenced an attack upon them. The fight was kept up from 10 o'clock A. M. till 5 P. M. The attack was not a general one as only some two regiments of the General were engaged--Cols. Newman and Raines's Tennessee Volunteers. We tried by almost every means to get the enemy from behind their breastworks, but to no avail. When they would venture out, we would drive them back in double-quick time. Night came on, and Gen. Zollicoffer fell bac
the California Regiment, out of 65 men only 15 had reported themselves; company D lost 32 men, and company G 45 men. The same correspondent says that eight companies of the California Regiment were in the fight, who, in pursuance of orders from Gen. Banks, went over under Gen. Baker to reinforce the 15th and 20th Massachusetts and the Tammany Regiment, which were fiercely engaged. He continues: The report that was handed in at the headquarters of Baker's Brigade, on the morning of the 22d, stated there were 322 men missing, and nine officers of the California regiment. The Tammany Regiment consisted of between 800 and 1,000 men, and but 400 had returned up to Wednesday morning. Gen. Stone issued the orders for Col. Baker to cross the Potomac at Conrad's Ferry at sunrise on Monday morning. When Col. Baker arrived there with his regiment, be found that the Tammany regiment, from New York, and the Fifteenth Massachusetts, under Col. Cogshall, had already crossed in advance.
egiment, were taken prisoners by the rebels. [The foregoing confirms accounts received in this city that the enemy crossed over into Virginia subsequent to the battle of Leesburg, and afterwards made a hasty retreat.-- Eds. Dis.] The Federal loss at ball's Bluff. The Baltimore South, of the 25th, learns that the loss of 620 on the Federal side at Ball's Bluff, reported in the Northern papers of Friday last, was based only upon partial returns. Up to midnight Thursday night, the 24th, full accounts had not been received at the Federal War Department. The correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer says that in company C, of the California Regiment, out of 65 men only 15 had reported themselves; company D lost 32 men, and company G 45 men. The same correspondent says that eight companies of the California Regiment were in the fight, who, in pursuance of orders from Gen. Banks, went over under Gen. Baker to reinforce the 15th and 20th Massachusetts and the Tammany Regime
It is possible that the Mexican Government might consent to the installation of the allies as collectors of the revenue; but if the present Mexican Government at all resembles any Government that Mexico ever had since she broke of her connection with Spain, it will none the less be certain to collect a new set of duties upon the goods when once landed. Even if the present Government be honest — which is hardly possible — there is no security for its continuance until the first day of next January. And should the allies interfere to prevent the collection of a second set of duties, they must end by planting their standards upon the steeple of the Grand Cathedral. Intervention in Mexico means, in plain terms, the conquest of Mexico. To accomplish their object, be it actually what it may, the allies have set on foot a very powerful naval expedition. The British fleet alone numbers twenty-six vessels, which carry more than five hundred guns, and are manned by six or seven thousa
January 27th (search for this): article 2
d, and the two started for the house in company. Mr. Taylor was shot soon afterwards, and though there was no actual witness to the occurrence, the report of the pistol was heard by persons on the place who ran to his assistance. In his dying statement, made in the presence of John B. Young, Esq., he declared that Bernard shot him while standing in the door of the house, about six or eight feet from him. Mr. Taylor lingered for a period of seventeen days, and died on the night of the 27th of January, retaining his consciousness to the last. The foregoing facts were elicited in the preliminary investigation before a justice of the county. The counsel waived an examination before the County Court, and the prisoner was remanded for final trial, which commenced before Judge John M. Gregory on Monday last. The testimony for the Commonwealth closed yesterday, and was more voluminous than on the first investigation. It is probable that the argument will commence to-day. No little
April 14th (search for this): article 8
pread over the whole heavens, and plunged the country into the horrors of civil war. Events have followed one after the other in quick succession, and to these Arctic voyagers it must seem as if the occurrences of an ordinary lifetime-had been compressed into the few months of their absence. "The United States sailed from Boston in July, 1860. She reached Upernavic after a short passage, and proceeded from thence to Smith's Straits, where she remained until July 10, 1861. "On the 14th of April, however, a party left the vessel, consisting of thirteen men and sixteen dogs, with boats on sledges. The leader of this dog team is now on board the United States, and is a fine specimen of the species. The party reached latitude 79 in the Middle Smith's Straits, and here the party divided--Dr. Hayes and three others went as far as latitude 81 deg. 35 min., west side of Kennedy Channel, and were then obliged to put back, their provisions being exhausted. Dr. Hayes reached his vesse
ever, a party left the vessel, consisting of thirteen men and sixteen dogs, with boats on sledges. The leader of this dog team is now on board the United States, and is a fine specimen of the species. The party reached latitude 79 in the Middle Smith's Straits, and here the party divided--Dr. Hayes and three others went as far as latitude 81 deg. 35 min., west side of Kennedy Channel, and were then obliged to put back, their provisions being exhausted. Dr. Hayes reached his vessel on the 27th of May. On the 13th July, 1861, they proceeded to Littleton Island, where the vessel remained until the 27th.--Sailing from thence in a northerly direction, they were met by immense packs of ice, which the vessel could not penetrate. She then made for Cape Isabella, on the west side of Smith's Straits, which was safety reached.--Boat parties were sent out from here to explore, but the ice was so solid that no chance was found for proceeding. The United States next came to an anchor at the Esq
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