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It is possible that the Mexican Government might consent to the installation of the allies as collectors of the revenue; but if the present Mexican Government at all resembles any Government that Mexico ever had since she broke of her connection with Spain, it will none the less be certain to collect a new set of duties upon the goods when once landed. Even if the present Government be honest — which is hardly possible — there is no security for its continuance until the first day of next January. And should the allies interfere to prevent the collection of a second set of duties, they must end by planting their standards upon the steeple of the Grand Cathedral. Intervention in Mexico means, in plain terms, the conquest of Mexico. To accomplish their object, be it actually what it may, the allies have set on foot a very powerful naval expedition. The British fleet alone numbers twenty-six vessels, which carry more than five hundred guns, and are manned by six or seven thousa
s this, united with the squadron of France and Spain, or even without their assistance, can easily put down any opposition which Mexico can make. Nor do we believe that old Abe and all his Yankees can prevent the allies from doing exactly what they please. That he will use high language, talk loudly about the Monroe doctrine, bluster and threater, we do not doubt. But he can impose on nobody but the miserable Mexicans themselves, who well remembering the victories of the Southern troops in 1846 and '47, and supposing then to be so many Yankee triumphs, entertain the most exaggerated notions of Yankee power.--The Yankee Minister, Tom Corwin, has neglected no opportunity to heighten these impressions. He has been intriguing with the Mexican Government to induce them to claim the protection of King Abe, and he graciously accords it, on condition that Yankees troops be allowed to pass over Mexican territory for the purpose of invading Texas. A loan of fifteen million in the meantime h
A. Lincoln (search for this): article 1
ing Texas. A loan of fifteen million in the meantime has been asked of the Federal Government, and doubtless, while that Government is squandering five hundred millions a year, it will not hesitate about so small a matter. The New York Herald assures us — at least its Washington correspondents do — that Old Abe has determined to sustain Mexico, and has caused a note to be addressed to the Ministers of the three powers, demanding an explanation of their intentions. If he will shell out the fifteen millions, it will enable Mexico to pay her debts, the allies will not seize her ports, and there will be no occasion for war. If he will not, he will be compelled to fight the allies, or back out. We rather think he will choose the latter course. We wish he would try the former. It may be that this Mexican imbroglio will lead to the opening of our ports, but we do not think it will. Our opinion is that Lincoln will submit to any species of insult rather than go to war with the allie
Tom Corwin (search for this): article 1
Nor do we believe that old Abe and all his Yankees can prevent the allies from doing exactly what they please. That he will use high language, talk loudly about the Monroe doctrine, bluster and threater, we do not doubt. But he can impose on nobody but the miserable Mexicans themselves, who well remembering the victories of the Southern troops in 1846 and '47, and supposing then to be so many Yankee triumphs, entertain the most exaggerated notions of Yankee power.--The Yankee Minister, Tom Corwin, has neglected no opportunity to heighten these impressions. He has been intriguing with the Mexican Government to induce them to claim the protection of King Abe, and he graciously accords it, on condition that Yankees troops be allowed to pass over Mexican territory for the purpose of invading Texas. A loan of fifteen million in the meantime has been asked of the Federal Government, and doubtless, while that Government is squandering five hundred millions a year, it will not hesitate a
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): article 1
ted no opportunity to heighten these impressions. He has been intriguing with the Mexican Government to induce them to claim the protection of King Abe, and he graciously accords it, on condition that Yankees troops be allowed to pass over Mexican territory for the purpose of invading Texas. A loan of fifteen million in the meantime has been asked of the Federal Government, and doubtless, while that Government is squandering five hundred millions a year, it will not hesitate about so small a teen millions, it will enable Mexico to pay her debts, the allies will not seize her ports, and there will be no occasion for war. If he will not, he will be compelled to fight the allies, or back out. We rather think he will choose the latter course. We wish he would try the former. It may be that this Mexican imbroglio will lead to the opening of our ports, but we do not think it will. Our opinion is that Lincoln will submit to any species of insult rather than go to war with the allies.
France (France) (search for this): article 1
Mexico. --Public attention — which has been for sometime absorbed by the transactions of daily occurrence immediately around — begins once more to be fixed upon Mexico. The alliance formed between France, England, and Spain, the object of which is to oblige Mexico to pay her just debts, will compel the Lincoln Government either to abandon the Monroe doctrine altogether, or to take a decided stand against the allies. It is true, that the allies, or at least the London Post, which is the o on foot a very powerful naval expedition. The British fleet alone numbers twenty-six vessels, which carry more than five hundred guns, and are manned by six or seven thousand seamen and marine. Such a fleet as this, united with the squadron of France and Spain, or even without their assistance, can easily put down any opposition which Mexico can make. Nor do we believe that old Abe and all his Yankees can prevent the allies from doing exactly what they please. That he will use high language
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
Mexico. --Public attention — which has been for sometime absorbed by the transactions of dailyely around — begins once more to be fixed upon Mexico. The alliance formed between France, England, and Spain, the object of which is to oblige Mexico to pay her just debts, will compel the Lincoln Gn, declare that they do not intend to land in Mexico; that their operations are to be confined to tovernment at all resembles any Government that Mexico ever had since she broke of her connection witeeple of the Grand Cathedral. Intervention in Mexico means, in plain terms, the conquest of Mexico.Mexico. To accomplish their object, be it actually what it may, the allies have set on foot a very powance, can easily put down any opposition which Mexico can make. Nor do we believe that old Abe and ts do — that Old Abe has determined to sustain Mexico, and has caused a note to be addressed to the shell out the fifteen millions, it will enable Mexico to pay her debts, the allies will not seize he<
by, alien enemy. Samuel Etheridge, Sheriff of Norfolk county--Rufus S. King, alien enemy. M. J. Ryan and John A. Higgins — Stanwood, and Proctor, and others, alien enemies. Thomas Lewis's heirs. W. Leigh Burton — Chickering & Co., alien enemies. James A. Moore--New York and Richmond Coal Company, alien enemies. Wm. Moody — John H. Rathein, alien enemy. Wm. J. Shepherson — D. M. Tallmadge, alien enemy. William Hudson — Francis R. Rives, alien enemy. James Anderson — Wm. C. Rives, Jr., alien enemy. James E. Walker — Amelia L. Sigourney, alien enemy. Fendall Griffin — Francis Graham, alien enemy. James G. Brooks — Francis Graham, alien enemy. John J. Toler — Charles R. Allen, alien enemy. Isaac Roper, (free negro)--Ebenezer and Peter Roper, alien enemies. The Belvidere Manufacturing Company — Goddard, Rice & Co., Manhattan Oil Company, and others, alien enemies. Williams Carter — Charle
Charles Carter (search for this): article 1
by, alien enemy. Samuel Etheridge, Sheriff of Norfolk county--Rufus S. King, alien enemy. M. J. Ryan and John A. Higgins — Stanwood, and Proctor, and others, alien enemies. Thomas Lewis's heirs. W. Leigh Burton — Chickering & Co., alien enemies. James A. Moore--New York and Richmond Coal Company, alien enemies. Wm. Moody — John H. Rathein, alien enemy. Wm. J. Shepherson — D. M. Tallmadge, alien enemy. William Hudson — Francis R. Rives, alien enemy. James Anderson — Wm. C. Rives, Jr., alien enemy. James E. Walker — Amelia L. Sigourney, alien enemy. Fendall Griffin — Francis Graham, alien enemy. James G. Brooks — Francis Graham, alien enemy. John J. Toler — Charles R. Allen, alien enemy. Isaac Roper, (free negro)--Ebenezer and Peter Roper, alien enemies. The Belvidere Manufacturing Company — Goddard, Rice & Co., Manhattan Oil Company, and others, alien enemies. Williams Carter — Charles Carte
ent of the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad Company — to affect Moncure Robinson and others, alien enemies. Mrs S. Henderson White--Henry C. Bankhead, alien enemy. Isaac N. Wolff — Simon Elhers, alien enemy. Edmund Fontaine Rose, trustee — John Potts and Louisa E., his wife, alien enemies. John K Cooke — O. E. Maltby, alien enemy. Samuel Etheridge, Sheriff of Norfolk county--Rufus S. King, alien enemy. M. J. Ryan and John A. Higgins — Stanwood, and Proctor, and others, alien enemies. Thomas Lewis's heirs. W. Leigh Burton — Chickering & Co., alien enemies. James A. Moore--New York and Richmond Coal Company, alien enemies. Wm. Moody — John H. Rathein, alien enemy. Wm. J. Shepherson — D. M. Tallmadge, alien enemy. William Hudson — Francis R. Rives, alien enemy. James Anderson — Wm. C. Rives, Jr., alien enemy. James E. Walker — Amelia L. Sigourney, alien enemy. Fendall Griffin — Franci
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