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,) and neglecting their duty, as they are of highway robbery. We have no complaint to make of such men. We respect their noble profession, and we think none the less of it, that all but the quacks in that profession have come to the conclusion that the less medicine you give a patient the better. But we hear that there are not a few incompetent surgeons in the army, and that in all probability they are producing a fatality greater than could be effected by the combined powers of McClellan, Scott, Rosencranz, and Fremont. It is believed that all the balls thrown by the ships in the Potomac, and the batteries on the shore, have not done as much damage to the Confederate army as the boluses of some of these doctors. We understand that a distinguished physician expresses the opinion that the army would be better off without doctors altogether, because the good ones cannot do as much good as the incompetent do harm. Our attention has also been called to another fact which demands atte
Rosencranz (search for this): article 2
glecting their duty, as they are of highway robbery. We have no complaint to make of such men. We respect their noble profession, and we think none the less of it, that all but the quacks in that profession have come to the conclusion that the less medicine you give a patient the better. But we hear that there are not a few incompetent surgeons in the army, and that in all probability they are producing a fatality greater than could be effected by the combined powers of McClellan, Scott, Rosencranz, and Fremont. It is believed that all the balls thrown by the ships in the Potomac, and the batteries on the shore, have not done as much damage to the Confederate army as the boluses of some of these doctors. We understand that a distinguished physician expresses the opinion that the army would be better off without doctors altogether, because the good ones cannot do as much good as the incompetent do harm. Our attention has also been called to another fact which demands attention. It
duty, as they are of highway robbery. We have no complaint to make of such men. We respect their noble profession, and we think none the less of it, that all but the quacks in that profession have come to the conclusion that the less medicine you give a patient the better. But we hear that there are not a few incompetent surgeons in the army, and that in all probability they are producing a fatality greater than could be effected by the combined powers of McClellan, Scott, Rosencranz, and Fremont. It is believed that all the balls thrown by the ships in the Potomac, and the batteries on the shore, have not done as much damage to the Confederate army as the boluses of some of these doctors. We understand that a distinguished physician expresses the opinion that the army would be better off without doctors altogether, because the good ones cannot do as much good as the incompetent do harm. Our attention has also been called to another fact which demands attention. It is that if su
McClellan (search for this): article 2
per annum,) and neglecting their duty, as they are of highway robbery. We have no complaint to make of such men. We respect their noble profession, and we think none the less of it, that all but the quacks in that profession have come to the conclusion that the less medicine you give a patient the better. But we hear that there are not a few incompetent surgeons in the army, and that in all probability they are producing a fatality greater than could be effected by the combined powers of McClellan, Scott, Rosencranz, and Fremont. It is believed that all the balls thrown by the ships in the Potomac, and the batteries on the shore, have not done as much damage to the Confederate army as the boluses of some of these doctors. We understand that a distinguished physician expresses the opinion that the army would be better off without doctors altogether, because the good ones cannot do as much good as the incompetent do harm. Our attention has also been called to another fact which dem