hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Thompson 22 0 Browse Search
Robert J. Morrison 15 1 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
William Bacon Stevens 10 0 Browse Search
Baker 10 6 Browse Search
W. H. T. Walker 9 1 Browse Search
Robert J. Breckinridge 9 1 Browse Search
Z. Kidwell 9 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 19 total hits in 10 results.

Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 9
nor to resign my appointment as a Brigadier General in the Provisional Army, which my self-respect as a gentleman and pride as a soldier will not allow me any longer to hold. I was the first officer of the old army to resign and offer my services to the South. I was in the old service oftener wounded than any officer in it, and as often brevetted for gallantry on the field of battle, and left it without a stain on my character as a gentleman and soldier. I was honored by my native State (Georgia) with the commission of Major General of the Provisional Army. In order to be in active service, I have been on the Potomac several months in command of a brigade, and nearly every mail recently has brought me intelligence of my being overslaughed by some young officer I ranked in the old service, and this in the face of an enemy. Young men have been put over me here who had not graduated at the West Point Academy until after I had been wounded several times in the service, and recommende
J. P. Benjamin (search for this): article 9
onor to be, with high consideration, your most humble servant, (S) W. H. T. Walker, Brig. Gen'l Comd'g Brig. To Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Sec. of War, Richmond, Va. Mr. Benjamin's reply. Confederate States America, War Department, Richmond. 29tMr. Benjamin's reply. Confederate States America, War Department, Richmond. 29th Oct. 1861. Sir: Your letter of the 27th inst., has been received. In it you tender your resignation as Brigadier-General in the Provisional Army. It is due to self-respect that I should remark on the impropriety of your using this Departmenresident, and, by his direction, your resignation is accepted. I have the honor to be, Your obedient servant, J. P. Benjamin, Acting Secretary of War. Maj. Gen. W. H. T. Walker, Richmond, Va. Gen. Walker's Rejoinder. Richmond, Oct. I doubt very much whether, in trying to preserve your own self-respect, (which has not been assailed,) you will not lose the respect of the country. Very respectfully, your ob't serv't. W. H. T. Walker, To Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Richmond, Va.
n command of a brigade, and nearly every mail recently has brought me intelligence of my being overslaughed by some young officer I ranked in the old service, and this in the face of an enemy. Young men have been put over me here who had not graduated at the West Point Academy until after I had been wounded several times in the service, and recommended by no less a soldier than Gen. Taylor for high military promotion. Not content with putting my own countrymen over me, an officeholder (General Lovell, from New York city, who was there under pay of New York, when our countrymen were gallantly fighting at Manassas and elsewhere,) has been brought to the South, and made Major General over men "to the manor born;" and, to cap the climax, the brigade I now command, and which I have been months drilling and putting in a proper state of discipline, is to be taken from me, and one of my junior Colonels put in command of it. I leave my name with the brigade. I know I have its confidence. On
General of the Provisional Army. In order to be in active service, I have been on the Potomac several months in command of a brigade, and nearly every mail recently has brought me intelligence of my being overslaughed by some young officer I ranked in the old service, and this in the face of an enemy. Young men have been put over me here who had not graduated at the West Point Academy until after I had been wounded several times in the service, and recommended by no less a soldier than Gen. Taylor for high military promotion. Not content with putting my own countrymen over me, an officeholder (General Lovell, from New York city, who was there under pay of New York, when our countrymen were gallantly fighting at Manassas and elsewhere,) has been brought to the South, and made Major General over men "to the manor born;" and, to cap the climax, the brigade I now command, and which I have been months drilling and putting in a proper state of discipline, is to be taken from me, and on
ith the brigade. I know I have its confidence. One would have suppposed that an Executive, who had himself been a soldier, would have scorned to have wounded the sensibilities of an old and tried soldier. The sacred cause for which I drew my sword, I will fight for in my native State; but I will not condescend to submit any longer to the insults and indignities of the Executive. I have the honor to be, with high consideration, your most humble servant, (S) W. H. T. Walker, Brig. Gen'l Comd'g Brig. To Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Sec. of War, Richmond, Va. Mr. Benjamin's reply. Confederate States America, War Department, Richmond. 29th Oct. 1861. Sir: Your letter of the 27th inst., has been received. In it you tender your resignation as Brigadier-General in the Provisional Army. It is due to self-respect that I should remark on the impropriety of your using this Department as the channel for conveying disrespectful and insulting comments on the action of the Command
W. H. T. Walker (search for this): article 9
Important correspondence — resignation of General Walker. The following correspondence appeared in the Whig, of yesterday: Headquarters 8th Brigade, Camp Reserve, Oct. 27, 1861. Sir: tive. I have the honor to be, with high consideration, your most humble servant, (S) W. H. T. Walker, Brig. Gen'l Comd'g Brig. To Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Sec. of War, Richmond, Va. Mr. Benj the honor to be, Your obedient servant, J. P. Benjamin, Acting Secretary of War. Maj. Gen. W. H. T. Walker, Richmond, Va. Gen. Walker's Rejoinder. Richmond, Oct. 30, 1861. Sir --YGen. Walker's Rejoinder. Richmond, Oct. 30, 1861. Sir --Your communication, informing me of the acceptance of my resignation, has been received. You state that "it is due to self-respect that I should remark on the impropriety of your using this Departmenyour own self-respect, (which has not been assailed,) you will not lose the respect of the country. Very respectfully, your ob't serv't. W. H. T. Walker, To Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Richmond, Va.
October 29th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 9
the sensibilities of an old and tried soldier. The sacred cause for which I drew my sword, I will fight for in my native State; but I will not condescend to submit any longer to the insults and indignities of the Executive. I have the honor to be, with high consideration, your most humble servant, (S) W. H. T. Walker, Brig. Gen'l Comd'g Brig. To Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Sec. of War, Richmond, Va. Mr. Benjamin's reply. Confederate States America, War Department, Richmond. 29th Oct. 1861. Sir: Your letter of the 27th inst., has been received. In it you tender your resignation as Brigadier-General in the Provisional Army. It is due to self-respect that I should remark on the impropriety of your using this Department as the channel for conveying disrespectful and insulting comments on the action of the Commander-in-Chief of the Army and the the Chief Magistrate of the Confederacy. His sole offence, according to the statements of your letter, consists in not select
October 30th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 9
and that you have thus been subjected "to the insults and indignities" of the Executive, is based on a total misapprehension of his duties and your rights, according to the laws which govern the army. Your communication has been submitted to the President, and, by his direction, your resignation is accepted. I have the honor to be, Your obedient servant, J. P. Benjamin, Acting Secretary of War. Maj. Gen. W. H. T. Walker, Richmond, Va. Gen. Walker's Rejoinder. Richmond, Oct. 30, 1861. Sir --Your communication, informing me of the acceptance of my resignation, has been received. You state that "it is due to self-respect that I should remark on the impropriety of your using this Department as the channel for conveying disrespectful and insulting comments on the action of the Commander-in-Chief of the Army and the Chief Magistrate of this Confederacy." My resignation had to be sent through your Department. It is the proper military channel, which your short sojou
er. The sacred cause for which I drew my sword, I will fight for in my native State; but I will not condescend to submit any longer to the insults and indignities of the Executive. I have the honor to be, with high consideration, your most humble servant, (S) W. H. T. Walker, Brig. Gen'l Comd'g Brig. To Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Sec. of War, Richmond, Va. Mr. Benjamin's reply. Confederate States America, War Department, Richmond. 29th Oct. 1861. Sir: Your letter of the 27th inst., has been received. In it you tender your resignation as Brigadier-General in the Provisional Army. It is due to self-respect that I should remark on the impropriety of your using this Department as the channel for conveying disrespectful and insulting comments on the action of the Commander-in-Chief of the Army and the the Chief Magistrate of the Confederacy. His sole offence, according to the statements of your letter, consists in not selecting you to be a Major- General, for there is
October 27th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 9
Important correspondence — resignation of General Walker. The following correspondence appeared in the Whig, of yesterday: Headquarters 8th Brigade, Camp Reserve, Oct. 27, 1861. Sir: I have the honor to resign my appointment as a Brigadier General in the Provisional Army, which my self-respect as a gentleman and pride as a soldier will not allow me any longer to hold. I was the first officer of the old army to resign and offer my services to the South. I was in the old service oftener wounded than any officer in it, and as often brevetted for gallantry on the field of battle, and left it without a stain on my character as a gentleman and soldier. I was honored by my native State (Georgia) with the commission of Major General of the Provisional Army. In order to be in active service, I have been on the Potomac several months in command of a brigade, and nearly every mail recently has brought me intelligence of my being overslaughed by some young officer I ranked i