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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Virginians (search for this): article 1
at present, we have no of such a consummation. Virginia has as the battle field. It is not that she has 70,000 men under arms-- enough that she has furnished 83,000 of arms to troops belonging to is not enough that the whole enormous army on the Potomac for months-- not enough that she has furbished and powder, and balls-- enough that she has done more for war than all the other States of the Con together — she must be made-- by her friends — to feel the full weight Her richest counties must be ecu the enemy, who are by no means to be last if they be defeated they should Maryland, and into Maryland she be pursued. They enemy are not to lest it should disturb some strategic tion. She is regarded as but a geo expression — but a field for the exer grand strategies combinations, in which to be plundered, no matter what be. But patience. This state cannot last more than six years. It thousands of loyal Virginians; but of that. They are not cotton plant
McClellan (search for this): article 1
War to keep off a Worse war. --The New Orleans Bee says General McClellan is reported to have really thought he could conquer the Confederate States, that it was as impossible for the United States to subjugate the South, as it is for the South to subjugate the United States, and that they (the United States) were keeping up the war because, if they had not a common enemy in the South, they would fall to fighting among themselves. We doubt with the Bee, whether McClellan ever gave utteraMcClellan ever gave utterance to any such opinion; but we have no doubt that in his heart he entertains it. And not only be, but all the Black Republican party. Whatever may have been the original conviction of that party, they must already have seen enough to shake it to the very foundation. Everywhere, since the commencement of the war — along the whole line of the frontier — the armies of the North, with only two exceptions, have suffered defeat. At Bethel at Bull Run, at Manassas, at Springfield at Lexington, at
s task. To call a people who possess more men and more guns, and more means of raising men and guns, than another, rebels, and to call those who are inferior in all these points, the only true men, is to talk nor Lincoln and his Cabinet must see this were they either statesmen or honest men, or men of common humanity, they would put an end to the shedding of blood, and the situation which they cannot make better by a century of war. But neither Lincoln, nor Seward, nor Cameron not Chase, is a wise statesman or patriot. Their whole character and the cause of the whole war, may be dispatched in four words. They Are All Speculators and lock upon the war as a The feeling exclamation of Lincoln, What is to become of my revenue! gives a key to the history of his whole reign. It is a war for money — a war of contractors for army supplies — a war of sharpers and stock brokers — a war in which every man who can get the ear of the Cabinets hopes to make himself a and from<
gate the South, as it is for the South to subjugate the United States, and that they (the United States) were keeping up the war because, if they had not a common enemy in the South, they would fall to fighting among themselves. We doubt with the Bee, whether McClellan ever gave utterance to any such opinion; but we have no doubt that in his heart he entertains it. And not only be, but all the Black Republican party. Whatever may have been the original conviction of that party, they must alre who can get the ear of the Cabinets hopes to make himself a and from which none of them ex come out worth less than a plumb. Out of the four hundred millions that have already disbursed by the Federal Treasury since Lincoln began to rule, the Bee estimates the perpetuated by the several species of public who have had access Secretaries, Generals, contractors, members of Congress serving as intermediate and other harpies of their feather-- no less than one hundred millions-- The chief of
are engaged in a hopeless task. To call a people who possess more men and more guns, and more means of raising men and guns, than another, rebels, and to call those who are inferior in all these points, the only true men, is to talk nor Lincoln and his Cabinet must see this were they either statesmen or honest men, or men of common humanity, they would put an end to the shedding of blood, and the situation which they cannot make better by a century of war. But neither Lincoln, nor Seward, nor Cameron not Chase, is a wise statesman or patriot. Their whole character and the cause of the whole war, may be dispatched in four words. They Are All Speculators and lock upon the war as a The feeling exclamation of Lincoln, What is to become of my revenue! gives a key to the history of his whole reign. It is a war for money — a war of contractors for army supplies — a war of sharpers and stock brokers — a war in which every man who can get the ear of the Cabinets hopes to m<
undred guns, and men, enough to take a place five times as powerful. Whatever Lincoln and his Cabinet may have thought in the beginning of this struggle, they must those who are inferior in all these points, the only true men, is to talk nor Lincoln and his Cabinet must see this were they either statesmen or honest men, or me situation which they cannot make better by a century of war. But neither Lincoln, nor Seward, nor Cameron not Chase, is a wise statesman or patriot. Their whhey Are All Speculators and lock upon the war as a The feeling exclamation of Lincoln, What is to become of my revenue! gives a key to the history of his wholur hundred millions that have already disbursed by the Federal Treasury since Lincoln began to rule, the Bee estimates the perpetuated by the several species of pucy on their part to se than their own countrymen, as want to hope that Lincoln of his party make peace as long as they can carry war upon our territory. A
Simon Cameron (search for this): article 1
n a hopeless task. To call a people who possess more men and more guns, and more means of raising men and guns, than another, rebels, and to call those who are inferior in all these points, the only true men, is to talk nor Lincoln and his Cabinet must see this were they either statesmen or honest men, or men of common humanity, they would put an end to the shedding of blood, and the situation which they cannot make better by a century of war. But neither Lincoln, nor Seward, nor Cameron not Chase, is a wise statesman or patriot. Their whole character and the cause of the whole war, may be dispatched in four words. They Are All Speculators and lock upon the war as a The feeling exclamation of Lincoln, What is to become of my revenue! gives a key to the history of his whole reign. It is a war for money — a war of contractors for army supplies — a war of sharpers and stock brokers — a war in which every man who can get the ear of the Cabinets hopes to make himself <
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
e has done more for war than all the other States of the Con together — she must be made-- by her friends — to feel the full weight Her richest counties must be ecu the enemy, who are by no means to be last if they be defeated they should Maryland, and into Maryland she be pursued. They enemy are not to lest it should disturb some strategic tion. She is regarded as but a geo expression — but a field for the exer grand strategies combinations, in which to be plundered, no matter whatcounties must be ecu the enemy, who are by no means to be last if they be defeated they should Maryland, and into Maryland she be pursued. They enemy are not to lest it should disturb some strategic tion. She is regarded as but a geo expression — but a field for the exer grand strategies combinations, in which to be plundered, no matter what be. But patience. This state cannot last more than six years. It thousands of loyal Virginians; but of that. They are not cotton pla
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
Worse war. --The New Orleans Bee says General McClellan is reported to have really thought he could conquer the Confederate States, that it was as impossible for the United States to subjugate the South, as it is for the South to subjugate the UnUnited States to subjugate the South, as it is for the South to subjugate the United States, and that they (the United States) were keeping up the war because, if they had not a common enemy in the South, they would fall to fighting among themselves. We doubt with the Bee, whether McClellan ever gave utterance to any such opinUnited States, and that they (the United States) were keeping up the war because, if they had not a common enemy in the South, they would fall to fighting among themselves. We doubt with the Bee, whether McClellan ever gave utterance to any such opinion; but we have no doubt that in his heart he entertains it. And not only be, but all the Black Republican party. Whatever may have been the original conviction of that party, they must already have seen enough to shake it to the very foundation. United States) were keeping up the war because, if they had not a common enemy in the South, they would fall to fighting among themselves. We doubt with the Bee, whether McClellan ever gave utterance to any such opinion; but we have no doubt that in his heart he entertains it. And not only be, but all the Black Republican party. Whatever may have been the original conviction of that party, they must already have seen enough to shake it to the very foundation. Everywhere, since the commencement of the war — along the whole line of the frontier — the armies of the North, with only two exceptions, have suffered defeat. At Bethel at Bull Run, at Manassas, at Springfield at Lexington, at New Orleans, at Cro
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ubt with the Bee, whether McClellan ever gave utterance to any such opinion; but we have no doubt that in his heart he entertains it. And not only be, but all the Black Republican party. Whatever may have been the original conviction of that party, they must already have seen enough to shake it to the very foundation. Everywhere, since the commencement of the war — along the whole line of the frontier — the armies of the North, with only two exceptions, have suffered defeat. At Bethel at Bull Run, at Manassas, at Springfield at Lexington, at New Orleans, at Cross-Lanes, at Carnifax Ferry, at Greenbrier, they have been signally overthrown. At Laurel Hill, with a force of ten thousand men, they succeeded after a desperate struggle, in overwhelming two hundred and forty-three brave soldiers. And at Hatteras inlet, they succeeded in capturing a small fort with an enormous fleet, carrying several hundred guns, and men, enough to take a place five times as powerful. Whatever Lincoln an
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