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Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 1
cal edifice, let the dead bury their dead. It is not even the question whether Davis and Stephens are the men best qualified of all others for the positions they octh and universality of the Southern movement. Of the public career of Jefferson Davis it is unnecessary that we should speak. This paper, which was behind no oocating Secession, has never failed to do justice to the Southern leaders, with Davis at their head, to whose sagacity, firmness, and energy, the Southern people are Lincolnish. In the Senate of the United States, and as Secretary of War, President Davis achieved a reputation for statesmanship which has been more than sustainedlexander H. Stephens. With such names upon the Presidential ticket as Jefferson Davis and A. H. Stephens, the whole South may unite as one man. All former partyen we give to Stephens as warm a heart and as cordial a hand as we ever gave to Davis. We recognize no longer any such distinction as Secessionists or Union men.--Th
Alexander H. Stephens (search for this): article 1
, let the dead bury their dead. It is not even the question whether Davis and Stephens are the men best qualified of all others for the positions they occupy. It isthe real estimate in which he is held even by an embittered enemy. Alexander H. Stephens, the candidate for the Vice Presidency, has long been known to the whol best qualities of statesmanship and a philosophic moderation of spirit than Mr. Stephens. He possesses a rare faculty of equanimity, of self- balance, and self-possey sea as in a calm, and which never catches a drop of water upon her decks. Mr. Stephens often reminds us of this life-boat. We have read speeches of his, deliveredas proved himself the Good Samaritan not less than the great statesman--Alexander H. Stephens. With such names upon the Presidential ticket as Jefferson Davis and A. H. Stephens, the whole South may unite as one man. All former party distinctions may well be obliterated. The strongest advocate of the old Union yield to no m
Unionists (search for this): article 1
s and A. H. Stephens, the whole South may unite as one man. All former party distinctions may well be obliterated. The strongest advocate of the old Union yield to no man in enthusiasm for the President, and we, who were among the first advocates of Secession in Virginia, believe that we speak the voice of all our colaborers when we give to Stephens as warm a heart and as cordial a hand as we ever gave to Davis. We recognize no longer any such distinction as Secessionists or Union men.--The past is dead and buried. Since the war began, the Union men have contributed as much by their labors, sacrifices, and perils, to the common cause as any original Secessionist of us all. "Greater proof of love can no man give," says the inspired volume, "than that he lay down his life for his friends." This is what both Secessionists and old Unionists have done and are doing every hour and every day, and man cannot demand a better test of affection and loyalty than that which God has proclaimed.
A. H. Stephens (search for this): article 1
himself the Good Samaritan not less than the great statesman--Alexander H. Stephens. With such names upon the Presidential ticket as Jefferson Davis and A. H. Stephens, the whole South may unite as one man. All former party distinctions may well be obliterated. The strongest advocate of the old Union yield to no man in enthusiasm for the President, and we, who were among the first advocates of Secession in Virginia, believe that we speak the voice of all our colaborers when we give to Stephens as warm a heart and as cordial a hand as we ever gave to Davis. We recognize no longer any such distinction as Secessionists or Union men.--The past is dead and buried. Since the war began, the Union men have contributed as much by their labors, sacrifices, and perils, to the common cause as any original Secessionist of us all. "Greater proof of love can no man give," says the inspired volume, "than that he lay down his life for his friends." This is what both Secessionists and old Unionis
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
The day of election. --For the first time the people of the Confederate States will to-day elect their own President and Vice President. There is no opposition to either of the candidates for these high positions. But it is most important that this fact should not be permitted to keep a single voter from the polls. Every loyal citizen of the Confederate States should feel that he has a duty to discharge to his country to-day by voting for the President and Vice President, and thus ensuring a full vote, and thereby letting the world see that the new Government is the work of the People of the South, and not of a faction, as is falsely pretended by fraught were they with wisdom, so wonderfully free from excitement and passion. And yet, the same man, as an orator, had no equal in the Congress of the late United States. The same calm atmosphere, through which words of wisdom and moderation can drop as softly and musically as summer rain upon the roof, can thicken with the te
James Lyons (search for this): article 1
erate States. With regard to the former, we have had very little excitement, though the candidates have done some electioneering in a private way, and the sovereigns have had ample opportunity for deciding between their respective merits. The candidates in the third district--which includes the city of Richmond the counties of Henrico, Hanover, Charles City, New Kent, Elizabeth City, Warwick, York, James City, and the city of Williamsburg — are Messrs. John Tyler, William H. MacFarlane, James Lyons, and Baker P. Lee The electoral ticket which has been proposed by the newspapers is composed as follows:--For the State at large — John R. Edmunds, of Halifax, and Allen T. Caperton, of Monroe.--For the Districts — Joseph Christian, 1st; Cincinnatus W. Newton, 2d; Raleigh T. Daniel, 3d; William F. Thompson, 4th; Wood Bouldin, 5th; William L. Goggin, 6th; Benjamin F. Randolph, 7th; James W. Walker, 8th; Asa Rogers, 9th; Samuel C. Williams, 10th; Samuel McD. Reid, 11th; Henry A. Edmundson, <
Allen T. Caperton (search for this): article 1
le opportunity for deciding between their respective merits. The candidates in the third district--which includes the city of Richmond the counties of Henrico, Hanover, Charles City, New Kent, Elizabeth City, Warwick, York, James City, and the city of Williamsburg — are Messrs. John Tyler, William H. MacFarlane, James Lyons, and Baker P. Lee The electoral ticket which has been proposed by the newspapers is composed as follows:--For the State at large — John R. Edmunds, of Halifax, and Allen T. Caperton, of Monroe.--For the Districts — Joseph Christian, 1st; Cincinnatus W. Newton, 2d; Raleigh T. Daniel, 3d; William F. Thompson, 4th; Wood Bouldin, 5th; William L. Goggin, 6th; Benjamin F. Randolph, 7th; James W. Walker, 8th; Asa Rogers, 9th; Samuel C. Williams, 10th; Samuel McD. Reid, 11th; Henry A. Edmundson, 12th; James W. Sheffey, 13th; Henry J. Fisher, 14th; Joseph Johnson, 15th; and E. H. Fitzhugh, 16th. The polls in this city will be held at the usual places, and it is desirable <
Asa Rogers (search for this): article 1
nd the city of Williamsburg — are Messrs. John Tyler, William H. MacFarlane, James Lyons, and Baker P. Lee The electoral ticket which has been proposed by the newspapers is composed as follows:--For the State at large — John R. Edmunds, of Halifax, and Allen T. Caperton, of Monroe.--For the Districts — Joseph Christian, 1st; Cincinnatus W. Newton, 2d; Raleigh T. Daniel, 3d; William F. Thompson, 4th; Wood Bouldin, 5th; William L. Goggin, 6th; Benjamin F. Randolph, 7th; James W. Walker, 8th; Asa Rogers, 9th; Samuel C. Williams, 10th; Samuel McD. Reid, 11th; Henry A. Edmundson, 12th; James W. Sheffey, 13th; Henry J. Fisher, 14th; Joseph Johnson, 15th; and E. H. Fitzhugh, 16th. The polls in this city will be held at the usual places, and it is desirable that as full a vote should be cast as circumstances will allow. Provision has been made for the soldiers in camp to exercise the right of suffrage, as well as for citizens of Virginia who are refugees from home in consequence of the prese<
ay fixed for the election of members of Congress and Electors of President and Vice President of the Confederate States. With regard to the former, we have had very little excitement, though the candidates have done some electioneering in a private way, and the sovereigns have had ample opportunity for deciding between their respective merits. The candidates in the third district--which includes the city of Richmond the counties of Henrico, Hanover, Charles City, New Kent, Elizabeth City, Warwick, York, James City, and the city of Williamsburg — are Messrs. John Tyler, William H. MacFarlane, James Lyons, and Baker P. Lee The electoral ticket which has been proposed by the newspapers is composed as follows:--For the State at large — John R. Edmunds, of Halifax, and Allen T. Caperton, of Monroe.--For the Districts — Joseph Christian, 1st; Cincinnatus W. Newton, 2d; Raleigh T. Daniel, 3d; William F. Thompson, 4th; Wood Bouldin, 5th; William L. Goggin, 6th; Benjamin F. Randolph, 7th; Ja<
iamsburg — are Messrs. John Tyler, William H. MacFarlane, James Lyons, and Baker P. Lee The electoral ticket which has been proposed by the newspapers is composed as follows:--For the State at large — John R. Edmunds, of Halifax, and Allen T. Caperton, of Monroe.--For the Districts — Joseph Christian, 1st; Cincinnatus W. Newton, 2d; Raleigh T. Daniel, 3d; William F. Thompson, 4th; Wood Bouldin, 5th; William L. Goggin, 6th; Benjamin F. Randolph, 7th; James W. Walker, 8th; Asa Rogers, 9th; Samuel C. Williams, 10th; Samuel McD. Reid, 11th; Henry A. Edmundson, 12th; James W. Sheffey, 13th; Henry J. Fisher, 14th; Joseph Johnson, 15th; and E. H. Fitzhugh, 16th. The polls in this city will be held at the usual places, and it is desirable that as full a vote should be cast as circumstances will allow. Provision has been made for the soldiers in camp to exercise the right of suffrage, as well as for citizens of Virginia who are refugees from home in consequence of the presence of the en
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