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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 7, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Ranaway.--ten dollars reward. --Ranaway from my plantation, in the lower end of Henrico county, about two months since, my negro men Riley, who is between 50 and 55 years of age, 5 feet 10 inches high, and is very black, and stammers when spoken to. He is no doubt well known in the city of Richmond, having been engaged for several years past, in hauling coal to said city. I am disposed to think he is now about the city of Richmond, or town of Manchester; and will give the above reward for his apprehension and delivery to me, on my plantation, or secured so that I get him. E. H. Poindexter. no 6--dst*
E. H. Poindexter (search for this): article 1
Ranaway.--ten dollars reward. --Ranaway from my plantation, in the lower end of Henrico county, about two months since, my negro men Riley, who is between 50 and 55 years of age, 5 feet 10 inches high, and is very black, and stammers when spoken to. He is no doubt well known in the city of Richmond, having been engaged for several years past, in hauling coal to said city. I am disposed to think he is now about the city of Richmond, or town of Manchester; and will give the above reward for his apprehension and delivery to me, on my plantation, or secured so that I get him. E. H. Poindexter. no 6--dst*
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Ranaway.--ten dollars reward. --Ranaway from my plantation, in the lower end of Henrico county, about two months since, my negro men Riley, who is between 50 and 55 years of age, 5 feet 10 inches high, and is very black, and stammers when spoken to. He is no doubt well known in the city of Richmond, having been engaged for several years past, in hauling coal to said city. I am disposed to think he is now about the city of Richmond, or town of Manchester; and will give the above reward for his apprehension and delivery to me, on my plantation, or secured so that I get him. E. H. Poindexter. no 6--dst*
Henrico (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Ranaway.--ten dollars reward. --Ranaway from my plantation, in the lower end of Henrico county, about two months since, my negro men Riley, who is between 50 and 55 years of age, 5 feet 10 inches high, and is very black, and stammers when spoken to. He is no doubt well known in the city of Richmond, having been engaged for several years past, in hauling coal to said city. I am disposed to think he is now about the city of Richmond, or town of Manchester; and will give the above reward for his apprehension and delivery to me, on my plantation, or secured so that I get him. E. H. Poindexter. no 6--dst*
the means of shaping and creating public opinion. The art of forming public opinion is known thoroughly only to men long apprenticed to service in the press. To the rest of the world, the currents taken by public opinion, seem as accidental and capricious as the course of the wind is eccentric; it is the experienced editor only who can shape their courses as readily as a skillful driver his vehicle, or a practiced helmsman his ship. One of the most remarkable features of the Revolution of 1776 was the strong support of public opinion that it elicited in Europe, not excepting even England itself. The enthusiasm which our Commissioners managed to inspire in its behalf was shown by the conduct of Lafayette, DeKalb, Kosciusko, Pulaski, Tom Paine, and the hosts of other strangers, who generously left their native countries to volunteer in the service of struggling America. The South has well nigh let its cause go by default in Europe, in the present crisis. Nothing has been done
We are glad to find the views we have long entertained on this subject so fully corroborated by the letter of an intelligent correspondent and prominent citizen of Virginia now in London, which we published Monday morning, and from which we reproduce the following paragraphs: The more reflecting and intelligent English and Frenchmen feel that they have held and promulgated erroneous views; but few dare assume the task of teaching the opposite.--When I first went to Paris, at the end of July, it may be said that every newspaper was against us, some negatively, and others not only positively, but bitterly. Soon after three brochures--one by Hon. T. Butler King, one by Judge Pequet, (whose charming lady, by the way, was from Richmond,) and a third by M. Ernest Bellot des Minieres — made their appearance. Immediately, almost, the tone of the press changed. In a single day twelve of the journals of France came out in long and very favorable criticisms upon M. Bellot's pamphlet. I
tion concerning the true state of Southern affairs. The South was a tabooed subject, except as a butt for abuse. Her slave-drivers, and slave institutions, were standing themes of execration; we were the bete noir, the pet abomination of the popular mind, a subject of conventional obloquy and execration. They knew us only through Uncle Tom's Cabin, through reviews of Sumner's speeches in the Edinburgh Quarterly, and through extracts and choice quotations from such infamous publications as Helper's Crisis. But for this deep-rooted prejudice, which had been planted long and firmly in the European mind, the cause of the South would have been more popular in Europe than any that has elicited the popular sympathies for half a century. As the case stands, bitterly as they hate, and profoundly as they loathe the Yankees, yet their long-standing prejudices against the South compel them to look upon the contest going on here as a struggle between bear and dog, between loathsome Yankees
s the foreign public ignorant of the South, but it desired to remain ignorant; and neither sought nor would tolerate information concerning the true state of Southern affairs. The South was a tabooed subject, except as a butt for abuse. Her slave-drivers, and slave institutions, were standing themes of execration; we were the bete noir, the pet abomination of the popular mind, a subject of conventional obloquy and execration. They knew us only through Uncle Tom's Cabin, through reviews of Sumner's speeches in the Edinburgh Quarterly, and through extracts and choice quotations from such infamous publications as Helper's Crisis. But for this deep-rooted prejudice, which had been planted long and firmly in the European mind, the cause of the South would have been more popular in Europe than any that has elicited the popular sympathies for half a century. As the case stands, bitterly as they hate, and profoundly as they loathe the Yankees, yet their long-standing prejudices agains
heir long-standing prejudices against the South compel them to look upon the contest going on here as a struggle between bear and dog, between loathsome Yankees on one side and a degraded and debased community of slaveholders on the other. The only avenue to public opinion in Europe is through the press — through the popular and independent press rather than the semiofficial or political; and it will be the subject of constant future regret that our Government did not send to London and Paris, at the outbreak of this war, a few able, discreet, and practiced writers, charged with the exclusive duty of putting forth through the independent press continual articles imparting correct views of Southern affairs and polities. Our forefathers did not commit this lamentable oversight. They supplied a large fund to their Commissioners in Europe for this purpose. At the head of that Commission they placed Benjamin Franklin, a printer and editor of long experience, acquainted with the
n, seem as accidental and capricious as the course of the wind is eccentric; it is the experienced editor only who can shape their courses as readily as a skillful driver his vehicle, or a practiced helmsman his ship. One of the most remarkable features of the Revolution of 1776 was the strong support of public opinion that it elicited in Europe, not excepting even England itself. The enthusiasm which our Commissioners managed to inspire in its behalf was shown by the conduct of Lafayette, DeKalb, Kosciusko, Pulaski, Tom Paine, and the hosts of other strangers, who generously left their native countries to volunteer in the service of struggling America. The South has well nigh let its cause go by default in Europe, in the present crisis. Nothing has been done except from individual impulse and by individual effort. The intelligent classes of the old world are anxious to sympathize with us, from their disgust and abomination of Yankeeism; but, with the lights before them, they
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