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y through the fight, but through the cowardice of his masters, fell into the hands of the enemy. On account of his jaded appearance and his many wounds, he was turned out to graze. There he stands beneath the tree in the meadow trying to shelter him self from the rain. Some time ago a party of young fellows got the old horse for a short ride in the country. Procuring a wagon, they hitched up and started off as merrily as possible. A Richmond boy, who had seen the horse perform on the 21st, determined to play a trick, and so stationed himself behind a tree on the road where they would pass, Along came the old horse at the top of his speed, drawing the rattling wagon with its merry load until opposite the tree where the trickster was bidden. Stepping out, he shouted "Halt" In a loud tone. The horse "halted" as suddenly as if stopped by a cannon ball, and instantly wheeled to the left to unlimber. Over went the wagon, and over went its load, measuring their length in the dirti
May, 11 AD (search for this): article 19
Army of the Potomac. [our own correspondent.] Centerville, Nov. 5th. It is now certain that the enemy has fallen back from his advanced position, and either gone into his entrenchments or taken a new shute towards our position. The latter seems hardly probable. A strange rumor is in circulation, one of those tales traceable to no particular origin, and yet believed on account of its probability, that McClellan has attempted an advance upon three different occasions, but retired each time because his men did not come up to the mark. Now, the rumor goes, he has given up entirely until the success of the armada shall inspire his men with confidence. Possibly this may be true; out, if so, only by accident. One thing now seems evident — McClellan does not intend to advance until the fleet is heard from, or until the Southern troops, hearing of the invasion of the Cotton States, shall have gone home and left Bull Run at his disposal. Yesterday a scouting party of abou
June, 11 AD (search for this): article 19
flat stones and earth, leaving a small fire place inside the tent. The flue is made by placing a barrel over the farther end of the trench. When the wind is the right way these fire-places are very comfortable, but when it is not they smoke terribly. Another objection to them is that the trenches are apt to wash away during rains, Just fire enough to look at is better than none at all, and if is does smoke one can bear it passably well. Bohemian. Army of The Potomac, Manassas, Nov. 6th. The past twenty-four hours has been so quiet that I am in doubt whether an item can be extracted from them or not. I have heard nothing new, and, therefore, how can I be expected to tell any news? Unless the army furnishes facts, how am I to publish facts about the army? St. Cecilla herself could not have played the organ if there had been nobody to blow the bellows for her. As the are sight of a fire seems to give warmth, so, I am conceited enough to believe, a letter containing n
July 1st, 1846 AD (search for this): article 19
received in the battle of the 21st. A short time ago, as is well known, Gen. Smith was made a jor General, and immediately after the command of the brigade was taken from Col. Forney and given to Col. C. M. Wncox, of the 10th Alabama, who was commissioned a Brigadier. Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox is a resigned U. S. officer, born in North Carolina, is a citizen of Tennessee, and was appointed to West Point from that State. He entered the army as brevet 2d Lieutenant in the 4th infantry, July 1st, 1846 He was brevetted 1st Lieutenant Sept. 13th, 1847, and received his commission in full August 24th, 1851. Having no personal acquaintance with General Wilcox I cannot speak of his qualifications as an officer, or of his characteristics He was the second Colonel in rank in the brigade, the third being Col. Sydenham Moore, of Alabama, a man well known in the South. I am told that Col. P. T. Moore, of the 1st Virginia regiment, has been placed in command, temporarily, of Gen. Longs
September 13th, 1847 AD (search for this): article 19
ago, as is well known, Gen. Smith was made a jor General, and immediately after the command of the brigade was taken from Col. Forney and given to Col. C. M. Wncox, of the 10th Alabama, who was commissioned a Brigadier. Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox is a resigned U. S. officer, born in North Carolina, is a citizen of Tennessee, and was appointed to West Point from that State. He entered the army as brevet 2d Lieutenant in the 4th infantry, July 1st, 1846 He was brevetted 1st Lieutenant Sept. 13th, 1847, and received his commission in full August 24th, 1851. Having no personal acquaintance with General Wilcox I cannot speak of his qualifications as an officer, or of his characteristics He was the second Colonel in rank in the brigade, the third being Col. Sydenham Moore, of Alabama, a man well known in the South. I am told that Col. P. T. Moore, of the 1st Virginia regiment, has been placed in command, temporarily, of Gen. Longstreet's Brigade. This is a fitting recognition
August 24th, 1851 AD (search for this): article 19
eral, and immediately after the command of the brigade was taken from Col. Forney and given to Col. C. M. Wncox, of the 10th Alabama, who was commissioned a Brigadier. Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox is a resigned U. S. officer, born in North Carolina, is a citizen of Tennessee, and was appointed to West Point from that State. He entered the army as brevet 2d Lieutenant in the 4th infantry, July 1st, 1846 He was brevetted 1st Lieutenant Sept. 13th, 1847, and received his commission in full August 24th, 1851. Having no personal acquaintance with General Wilcox I cannot speak of his qualifications as an officer, or of his characteristics He was the second Colonel in rank in the brigade, the third being Col. Sydenham Moore, of Alabama, a man well known in the South. I am told that Col. P. T. Moore, of the 1st Virginia regiment, has been placed in command, temporarily, of Gen. Longstreet's Brigade. This is a fitting recognition of the merit and gallant conduct of Col. Moore, who bra
July 1st, 1852 AD (search for this): article 19
hanges have been made within a few weeks which have not been noticed in the public prints. Gen. Kirby Smith sold brigade, composed of the 9th, 10th, and 11th Alabama and one regiment from Mississippi, is now under Gen. Wilcox, one of the newly made Brigadiers. Before the promotion of Gen. Smith the brigade was under J H Forney, Col. Commanding, Col. Forney is a North Carolinian by birth, but has become an Alabamian by adoption, and was appointed a cadet to West Point from that State.--July 1st, 1852, he entered the United States army as brevet Second Lieutenant in the 7th Infantry. He was made a First Lieutenant on the 25th of August, 1855. If I am correctly informed, he was at one time a tutor in the military Academy. At the beginning of the present troubles, Lieut. Forney was among the first to send in his resignation, and to offer his services to Alabama. He was made a Colonel in the State service and sent to Pensacola, where he was second in command, of. Forney there became v
August 25th, 1855 AD (search for this): article 19
h, 10th, and 11th Alabama and one regiment from Mississippi, is now under Gen. Wilcox, one of the newly made Brigadiers. Before the promotion of Gen. Smith the brigade was under J H Forney, Col. Commanding, Col. Forney is a North Carolinian by birth, but has become an Alabamian by adoption, and was appointed a cadet to West Point from that State.--July 1st, 1852, he entered the United States army as brevet Second Lieutenant in the 7th Infantry. He was made a First Lieutenant on the 25th of August, 1855. If I am correctly informed, he was at one time a tutor in the military Academy. At the beginning of the present troubles, Lieut. Forney was among the first to send in his resignation, and to offer his services to Alabama. He was made a Colonel in the State service and sent to Pensacola, where he was second in command, of. Forney there became very popular with the troops under his command, and by constant drilling got them in a very efficient state. He built the first battery oppos
October 11th, 9 AD (search for this): article 19
y, every sign of a retreat, that seems the most plausible solution of the activity observable last night. This morning the 2d company of the Washington Artillery returned from picket duty on the outposts, and the 1st company, Captain squires, was sent to take its place. The 3d company, Captain Miller, has returned from Leesburg. Several changes have been made within a few weeks which have not been noticed in the public prints. Gen. Kirby Smith sold brigade, composed of the 9th, 10th, and 11th Alabama and one regiment from Mississippi, is now under Gen. Wilcox, one of the newly made Brigadiers. Before the promotion of Gen. Smith the brigade was under J H Forney, Col. Commanding, Col. Forney is a North Carolinian by birth, but has become an Alabamian by adoption, and was appointed a cadet to West Point from that State.--July 1st, 1852, he entered the United States army as brevet Second Lieutenant in the 7th Infantry. He was made a First Lieutenant on the 25th of August, 18
dier recently appointed to General William Henry Walker's brigade, has arrived and taken command. There is no disguising the fact that the men are very much dissatisfied at the change. They are not half the fighting men they were two weeks ago I know nothing about the qualifications of Gen. Taylor for the position, and do not feel it liberty to take sides in the quarrel until acquainted with both. Captain Surzett, former aid to General Walker, has been appointed his Adjutant General. Captain Anderson, Adjutant to General Walker, has been ordered to Fernandina. On account of the inclemency of the weather, but few people came out to the polls to vote for President and members of congress. This precinct has its box at the Medical Director's Office, formerly known as Carmon's Store. One hundred and fifty-two votes were cast for President and Vice President, and all for Davis and Stephens. The soldiers voted at their regiments, and the result has not yet been given. At this preci
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