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ads until Tuesday, October 29th. When the entire fleet sailed, consisting of from fifty to sixty sail of vessels of all classes, from the powerful steamships Vanderbilt, Battle, Wabash, Minnesota, and Roanoke to the ordinary sized bug-boat. On Wednesday, it blew heavity from the Southwest, lasting twelve hours, when the wind changed to Southeast and continued stormy, but the smaller vessels were somewhat protected from its force by keeping close under the shore. Early on Friday, the 1st instant, the wind shifted to southeast, and increased to a most severe gate, in which the squadron got separated. White keeping close in shore early on Saturday, say between two and three A. M., the Osceola got ashore on the Day Breaker, off North Island, near Georgetown, and in two hours she bilged, the cattle soon taking to the water, and many of them raaching shore. The vessel having become a wreck, the officers and crew twenty in number, took to their boats, in which they coached North Isla
October 24th (search for this): article 19
y last. Loss of the Lincoln transport Osceola. The Charleston Courier, of Wednesday, has the following account of the loss of the Federal transport Osceola: Capt. Morritt, of the Yankee transport steam propelier Osceola, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C., in charge of Captains Pinckney and Mazyck, and was taken to the Guard-House, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton Roads, with a cargo consisting of fifty head of beef cattle, five hundred barrels of potatoes and sundries, arrived at Fortress Monroe, October 27th, where eleven head of cattle were landed, leaving thirty-nine on the vessel. At New York we were ordered to take on board water and provisions for only fifteen days, which made it evident we were not to proceed south of the coast of Georgin, as such a supply would not have answered for a trip to the Gull remained in Hampton Roa
October 27th (search for this): article 19
: Capt. Morritt, of the Yankee transport steam propelier Osceola, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C., in charge of Captains Pinckney and Mazyck, and was taken to the Guard-House, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton Roads, with a cargo consisting of fifty head of beef cattle, five hundred barrels of potatoes and sundries, arrived at Fortress Monroe, October 27th, where eleven head of cattle were landed, leaving thirty-nine on the vessel. At New York we were ordered to take on board water and provisions for only fifteen days, which made it evident we were not to proceed south of the coast of Georgin, as such a supply would not have answered for a trip to the Gull remained in Hampton Roads until Tuesday, October 29th. When the entire fleet sailed, consisting of from fifty to sixty sail of vessels of all classes, from the powerful steamships Vander
October 29th (search for this): article 19
to take on board water and provisions for only fifteen days, which made it evident we were not to proceed south of the coast of Georgin, as such a supply would not have answered for a trip to the Gull remained in Hampton Roads until Tuesday, October 29th. When the entire fleet sailed, consisting of from fifty to sixty sail of vessels of all classes, from the powerful steamships Vanderbilt, Battle, Wabash, Minnesota, and Roanoke to the ordinary sized bug-boat. On Wednesday, it blew heavityficult to discover the wreck from the sea. Five more prisoners sent forward this morning, making the whole number 81. The following is the Federal account, furnished the Progress by the same correspondent: Left Fortress Mouroe Tuesday, Oct. 29, on board the U. S. steam transport Union. Had on board 64 horses, several bales of hay, and about 100 cags of cats, 12 gun-carriages, several kegs of powder, 3,000 gallons of water, and somewhere in the neighborhood of 250 tons of coal, al
November 4th (search for this): article 19
t informed as to their number, and had no correct idea. The wreck of the Osceola was boarded on Monday by the boats of a blockading steamer. The wreck of the Federal transport Union--a Yankee account. A telegraphic dispatch has already appeared in this paper relative to the loss of the "Union," attached to the Federal armada, which left Hampton Roads a few days ago. -- The following particulars, we take from the Fort Macon correspondence of the New bern (N. C.) Progress, dated Nov. 4: Our ferces have been employed all day getting out the valuables from the wreck. She proves to be a prize indeed. It is impossible for me to give a detailed account of the cargo and what we have already recovered. In a general way I may state correctly the cargo will be worth over $100,000 to the Confederates. Two rifled 24-pounders have been got out, Sharp's rifles and cartridges, 11 horses were saved, 800 blankets. &c. &c. The engine is worth $30,000 and will be recovered.
The effect of the late storm on the Federal fleet. Below will be found some account of the disasters to the Federal fleet from the storm which prevailed on Friday and Saturday last. Loss of the Lincoln transport Osceola. The Charleston Courier, of Wednesday, has the following account of the loss of the Federal transport Osceola: Capt. Morritt, of the Yankee transport steam propelier Osceola, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C., in charge of Captains Pinckney and Mazyck, and was taken to the Guard-House, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton Roads, with a cargo consisting of fifty head of beef cattle, five hundred barrels of potatoes and sundries, arrived at Fortress Monroe, October 27th, where eleven head of cattle were landed, leaving thirty-nine on the vessel. At New York we were ordered to take on board water and provisions for on
Fortrees Monroe (search for this): article 19
furnished the Progress by the same correspondent: Left Fortress Mouroe Tuesday, Oct. 29, on board the U. S. steam transport Union. Had on board 64 horses, several bales of hay, and about 100 cags of cats, 12 gun-carriages, several kegs of powder, 3,000 gallons of water, and somewhere in the neighborhood of 250 tons of coal, also 4 baggage wago s, several sets of harnes, 2 rified cannon, five or six barrels whiskey, several saddles, and provisions enough to last 15 days. On leaving Fortrees Monroe the ships were formed into three distinct lines. Could not say for certain how many ships were engaged in the expedition — should think there was from 50 to 75 Kept in line through Tuesday; Wednesday afternoon it blew a gaie, and put back to Hatteras Intel, and anchored for the night. Thursday morning clear and pleasant, hauled anchor and proceeded in a southerly direction; at night was in sight of the whole fleet. Friday morning it blew a gale from the sontheast, lasting about 25 ho
increased to a most severe gate, in which the squadron got separated. White keeping close in shore early on Saturday, say between two and three A. M., the Osceola got ashore on the Day Breaker, off North Island, near Georgetown, and in two hours she bilged, the cattle soon taking to the water, and many of them raaching shore. The vessel having become a wreck, the officers and crew twenty in number, took to their boats, in which they coached North Island, and were taken prisoners. Capt. Morrill describes the gale as verysevere, and thinks that many of the fleet must have become disabled or lost — some of them being old and by no means capable of going through such weather. He had no instructions directing him where to proceed, his only orders being to follow the large ships, and other Captains whom he questioned in regard to their destination had only been directed in the same way. The Osceola was owned in New York, and has been engaged in trading from Cuba to Hondura
The effect of the late storm on the Federal fleet. Below will be found some account of the disasters to the Federal fleet from the storm which prevailed on Friday and Saturday last. Loss of the Lincoln transport Osceola. The Charleston Courier, of Wednesday, has the following account of the loss of the Federal transport Osceola: Capt. Morritt, of the Yankee transport steam propelier Osceola, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C., in charge of Captains Pinckney and Mazyck, and was taken to the Guard-House, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton Roads, with a cargo consisting of fifty head of beef cattle, five hundred barrels of potatoes and sundries, arrived at Fortress Monroe, October 27th, where eleven head of cattle were landed, leaving thirty-nine on the vessel. At New York we were ordered to take on board water and provisions for o
The effect of the late storm on the Federal fleet. Below will be found some account of the disasters to the Federal fleet from the storm which prevailed on Friday and Saturday last. Loss of the Lincoln transport Osceola. The Charleston Courier, of Wednesday, has the following account of the loss of the Federal transport Osceola: Capt. Morritt, of the Yankee transport steam propelier Osceola, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C., in charge of Captains Pinckney and Mazyck, and was taken to the Guard-House, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton Roads, with a cargo consisting of fifty head of beef cattle, five hundred barrels of potatoes and sundries, arrived at Fortress Monroe, October 27th, where eleven head of cattle were landed, leaving thirty-nine on the vessel. At New York we were ordered to take on board water and provisions for o
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