hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Baker 20 18 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 19 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Fremont 17 3 Browse Search
Devens 15 15 Browse Search
Jeremiah M. Smith 14 0 Browse Search
John Miller 12 0 Browse Search
Gorman 12 10 Browse Search
Scott 12 4 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 44 total hits in 20 results.

1 2
Osceola, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 19
The effect of the late storm on the Federal fleet. Below will be found some account of the disasters to the Federal fleet from the storm which prevailed on Friday and Saturday last. Loss of the Lincoln transport Osceola. The Charleston Courier, of Wednesday, has the following account of the loss of the Federal transport Osceola: Capt. Morritt, of the Yankee transport steam propelier Osceola, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C., in charge of Captains Pinckney and Mazyck, and was taken to the Guard-House, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton Roads, with a cargo consisting of fifty head of beef cattle, five hundred barrels of potatoes and sundries, arrived at Fortress Monroe, October 27th, where eleven head of cattle were landed, leaving thirty-nine on the vessel. At New York we were ordered to take on board water and provisions for o
Honduras (Honduras) (search for this): article 19
t. Morrill describes the gale as verysevere, and thinks that many of the fleet must have become disabled or lost — some of them being old and by no means capable of going through such weather. He had no instructions directing him where to proceed, his only orders being to follow the large ships, and other Captains whom he questioned in regard to their destination had only been directed in the same way. The Osceola was owned in New York, and has been engaged in trading from Cuba to Honduras. Her tonnage was 177. Capt. M. informs us that some of the large transports that left New York took on board troops at that place, but he was not informed as to their number, and had no correct idea. The wreck of the Osceola was boarded on Monday by the boats of a blockading steamer. The wreck of the Federal transport Union--a Yankee account. A telegraphic dispatch has already appeared in this paper relative to the loss of the "Union," attached to the Federal armada, which l
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 19
ransport Osceola: Capt. Morritt, of the Yankee transport steam propelier Osceola, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C., in charge of Captains Pinckney and Mazyck, and was taken to the Guard-House, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton Roads, with a cargo consisting of fifty head of beef cattle, five hundred barrels of potatoes and sundries, arrived at Fortress Monroe, October 27th, where eleven head of cattle were landed, leaving thirty-nine on the vessel. At New York we were ordered to take on board water and provisions for only fifteen days, which made it evident we were not to proceed south of the coast of Georgin, as such a supply would not have answered for a trip to the Gull remained in Hampton Roads until Tuesday, October 29th. When the entire fleet sailed, consisting of from fifty to sixty sail of vessels of all classes, from the powerful
Havana (Cuba) (search for this): article 19
, lasting about 25 hours, carrying away fore-sail and main-sail. Saturday morning signaled the Pawnee, ship leaking, and was ordered to put back. Got out of our way and went ashore about thirteen miles south of Forl Macon. (Signed) John R. fisher, Wagon Master 7th Regt. Conn. Vol. A Spanish steamer in Distress. The Charlefton Courier says: The late southeast gale has done considerable damage on the coast Capt. Reynais, of the Spanish steamer Neustra Sonora de Ragla, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C. His steamer was from New York bound of Havana, where she is intended for a ferry boat, and she has suffered from the late stormy weather, having been ashore near Ocracocke, N. C., and has put into Georgetown, S. C. with machinery disabled and vessel somewhat injured. Her captain informs us that she is a new and powerful boat of three hundred tons. Capt. R. has come here to see after having his vessel properly repaired, and to consult the Spanish Consul.
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): article 19
. Capt. Morrill describes the gale as verysevere, and thinks that many of the fleet must have become disabled or lost — some of them being old and by no means capable of going through such weather. He had no instructions directing him where to proceed, his only orders being to follow the large ships, and other Captains whom he questioned in regard to their destination had only been directed in the same way. The Osceola was owned in New York, and has been engaged in trading from Cuba to Honduras. Her tonnage was 177. Capt. M. informs us that some of the large transports that left New York took on board troops at that place, but he was not informed as to their number, and had no correct idea. The wreck of the Osceola was boarded on Monday by the boats of a blockading steamer. The wreck of the Federal transport Union--a Yankee account. A telegraphic dispatch has already appeared in this paper relative to the loss of the "Union," attached to the Federal armad
Georgetown, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 19
he Lincoln transport Osceola. The Charleston Courier, of Wednesday, has the following account of the loss of the Federal transport Osceola: Capt. Morritt, of the Yankee transport steam propelier Osceola, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C., in charge of Captains Pinckney and Mazyck, and was taken to the Guard-House, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton nn. Vol. A Spanish steamer in Distress. The Charlefton Courier says: The late southeast gale has done considerable damage on the coast Capt. Reynais, of the Spanish steamer Neustra Sonora de Ragla, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C. His steamer was from New York bound of Havana, where she is intended for a ferry boat, and she has suffered from the late stormy weather, having been ashore near Ocracocke, N. C., and has put into Georgetown, S. C. with machinery disabled a
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 19
ouse, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton Roads, with a cargo consisting of fifty head of beef cattle, five hundred barrels of potatoes and sundries, arrived at Fortress Monroe, October 27th, where eleven hn days, which made it evident we were not to proceed south of the coast of Georgin, as such a supply would not have answered for a trip to the Gull remained in Hampton Roads until Tuesday, October 29th. When the entire fleet sailed, consisting of from fifty to sixty sail of vessels of all classes, from the powerful steamships Vande Yankee account. A telegraphic dispatch has already appeared in this paper relative to the loss of the "Union," attached to the Federal armada, which left Hampton Roads a few days ago. -- The following particulars, we take from the Fort Macon correspondence of the New bern (N. C.) Progress, dated Nov. 4: Our ferces have b
he whole fleet. Friday morning it blew a gale from the sontheast, lasting about 25 hours, carrying away fore-sail and main-sail. Saturday morning signaled the Pawnee, ship leaking, and was ordered to put back. Got out of our way and went ashore about thirteen miles south of Forl Macon. (Signed) John R. fisher, Wagon Master 7th Regt. Conn. Vol. A Spanish steamer in Distress. The Charlefton Courier says: The late southeast gale has done considerable damage on the coast Capt. Reynais, of the Spanish steamer Neustra Sonora de Ragla, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C. His steamer was from New York bound of Havana, where she is intended for a ferry boat, and she has suffered from the late stormy weather, having been ashore near Ocracocke, N. C., and has put into Georgetown, S. C. with machinery disabled and vessel somewhat injured. Her captain informs us that she is a new and powerful boat of three hundred tons. Capt. R. has come here to see after having hi
The effect of the late storm on the Federal fleet. Below will be found some account of the disasters to the Federal fleet from the storm which prevailed on Friday and Saturday last. Loss of the Lincoln transport Osceola. The Charleston Courier, of Wednesday, has the following account of the loss of the Federal transport Osceola: Capt. Morritt, of the Yankee transport steam propelier Osceola, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C., in charge of Captains Pinckney and Mazyck, and was taken to the Guard-House, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton Roads, with a cargo consisting of fifty head of beef cattle, five hundred barrels of potatoes and sundries, arrived at Fortress Monroe, October 27th, where eleven head of cattle were landed, leaving thirty-nine on the vessel. At New York we were ordered to take on board water and provisions for o
all classes, from the powerful steamships Vanderbilt, Battle, Wabash, Minnesota, and Roanoke to the ordinary sized bug-boat. On Wednesday, it blew heavity from the Southwest, lasting twelve hours, when the wind changed to Southeast and continued stormy, but the smaller vessels were somewhat protected from its force by keeping close under the shore. Early on Friday, the 1st instant, the wind shifted to southeast, and increased to a most severe gate, in which the squadron got separated. White keeping close in shore early on Saturday, say between two and three A. M., the Osceola got ashore on the Day Breaker, off North Island, near Georgetown, and in two hours she bilged, the cattle soon taking to the water, and many of them raaching shore. The vessel having become a wreck, the officers and crew twenty in number, took to their boats, in which they coached North Island, and were taken prisoners. Capt. Morrill describes the gale as verysevere, and thinks that many of the fleet
1 2