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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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n desert the unfortunate. He remained with them for several days, and until they were properly cared for, without being molested, and then, through the assistant of a negro, left the island and returned to the city.--Savannah Republican, 12th inst. Negro Fidelity. The Savannah Republican of the 12th inst., has the following paragraph: We have heretofore stated that in the retreat from Hilton Head, Captain Read was compelled to abandon two brass field pieces, and leave the horses grazing on the Island. Saturday last, a faithful negro man, the property of Mr. Pope, who resides on the Island, captured all the horses of the battery, sixteen in number, placed them in a flat, brought them to Savannah, and delivered them to the Captain. We also learn that the guns have been recovered and will be up in a day or two. The vote for Governor of Georgia. The vote for Governor resulted as follows: For Brown45,401 For Nisbet32,429 Majority for Brown13,975
These are the unvarnished facts of the "great Federate victory at West Liberty." The Confederates in Rockville, Ky. The Louisville (Ky.) Journal, one of the most unscrupulous lying journals in all Lincolndale, publishes the following. On the 24th ult., the rebels in force marched into Burkesville, Cumberland county, Ky. and took possession of the town, and, as is their custom, commenced robbing and plundering the citizens. The Lebanon Kentuckian says they entered the store of a Mr. Ryan and others, helped themselves to whatever they wanted, offering to pay in worthless Tennessee money, after which they proposed to favor the citizens with a grand dress parade, which they invited all to see. About the note, however, this grand exhibition of thieves and murderers, under the name and disguise of an army, were forming, a messenger rode into town informing them of the near approach of a large body of Union troops, which produced such confusion in their ranks that they immediate
ising capture and a protracted confinement in Lincoln's dangerous, rather than desert the unfortunate. He remained with them for several days, and until they were properly cared for, without being molested, and then, through the assistant of a negro, left the island and returned to the city.--Savannah Republican, 12th inst. Negro Fidelity. The Savannah Republican of the 12th inst., has the following paragraph: We have heretofore stated that in the retreat from Hilton Head, Captain Read was compelled to abandon two brass field pieces, and leave the horses grazing on the Island. Saturday last, a faithful negro man, the property of Mr. Pope, who resides on the Island, captured all the horses of the battery, sixteen in number, placed them in a flat, brought them to Savannah, and delivered them to the Captain. We also learn that the guns have been recovered and will be up in a day or two. The vote for Governor of Georgia. The vote for Governor resulted as foll
William Elliott (search for this): article 1
t of a plurality over our competitors. 3d. Had we secured all the suffrage we thought should have been extended to us, we would have been elected. 4th. We did not secure, that suffrage; consequently we were not elected. 5th. We were defeated because "Republics are always ungrateful." And it being doubtful with some as to whether we are living in a Republic, they concluded to wait and ascertain the fact before they cast their votes either way. A Praiseworthy act. Dr. Wm. Elliott, of this city, acted a noble and self sacrificing part in and after the battle of Fort Royal, and it deserves to be noted. He accompanied the Georgia troops in an unofficial capacity, we learn, to the island, and was present ministering to the wounded throughout the action. At the time a retreat was ordered, he was engaged with four wounded men in the hospital, and had every opportunity to make his escape, but he preferred rising capture and a protracted confinement in Lincoln's dange
t as many as two hundred in this field. They were mostly of the 6th lowa Regiment, and some of the 27th . The Lincoln and Colonel and three . I know to have been killed, or wounded and taken prisoners. The Iowa was almost . The scene upon the battle field was awful. The wounded groaned and yelled and shrieked with pain. I had opium, brandy, and water, with which I alleviated their fortune, and, poor creatures, they were exceedingly grateful. I was out till 2 o'clock that night with Col. Neely and a battalion of the 4th regiment, picking up the wounded. In the woods and in this field the deed were so thick that it required careful riding to keep from trampling their bodies. The only means I had of knowing the road that night was by the corpses I had noticed in the afternoon. In one place there were eleven bodies lying side by side, further on were five, in another place were fifteen near together.--These were the only groups that I noticed, but I sometimes found six or eight
rom a source that we can vouch for as perfectly reliable: We detached from Prestonsburg two companies, part cavalry and part infantry, numbering about 200--Capts. May and Hunter-Capt. May being in command of the expedition. Our object was simply to establish a temporary camp at West Liberty, so as to concentrate the scattereCapt. May being in command of the expedition. Our object was simply to establish a temporary camp at West Liberty, so as to concentrate the scattered elements of the Southern rights party through that region.--We soon heard that a force of several hundred Federals were at McCormick's Gap — We sailed out with a small detachment of cavalry, and when they heard our little part approaching, the terror which emanates from craven and cowardly hearts soon magnified us into a very lar The killed one old man about seventy years old, who was on his way to mill. His name was Davis. I was at Prestonsburg a day or two after the fight and saw Captains May and Hunter's companies mustered into the Confederate service and I believe every man who started on the expedition responded to the roll ball. These are the u
James Davis (search for this): article 1
s among them, and then retired through the bushes, every man for himself. Their forces consisted of about too or cavalry, about 400 infantry, and one small field piece. We had only about 65 or 70 guns that were in at on edition to shoot. We have reliable information that we killed and wounded from 30 to 50 at them. We did not lose a man; I believe one or two of our boys were very slightly wounded. The killed one old man about seventy years old, who was on his way to mill. His name was Davis. I was at Prestonsburg a day or two after the fight and saw Captains May and Hunter's companies mustered into the Confederate service and I believe every man who started on the expedition responded to the roll ball. These are the unvarnished facts of the "great Federate victory at West Liberty." The Confederates in Rockville, Ky. The Louisville (Ky.) Journal, one of the most unscrupulous lying journals in all Lincolndale, publishes the following. On the 24th ult., the rebels i
n desert the unfortunate. He remained with them for several days, and until they were properly cared for, without being molested, and then, through the assistant of a negro, left the island and returned to the city.--Savannah Republican, 12th inst. Negro Fidelity. The Savannah Republican of the 12th inst., has the following paragraph: We have heretofore stated that in the retreat from Hilton Head, Captain Read was compelled to abandon two brass field pieces, and leave the horses grazing on the Island. Saturday last, a faithful negro man, the property of Mr. Pope, who resides on the Island, captured all the horses of the battery, sixteen in number, placed them in a flat, brought them to Savannah, and delivered them to the Captain. We also learn that the guns have been recovered and will be up in a day or two. The vote for Governor of Georgia. The vote for Governor resulted as follows: For Brown45,401 For Nisbet32,429 Majority for Brown13,975
David Vollmer (search for this): article 1
, leaving the poor man exposed to the flames of the burning tent adjoining, etc. Incident of the battle. The Appeal's Columbus correspondent relates the following interesting incident: An incident of heroic conduct is related in connection with the first heavy charge that our columbus made upon the enemy, which, as an incident of the battle, should not go unrecorded. When the two columns came face to face, Col. Walker's regiment was immediately opposed to the 7th Iowa, and David Vollmer, of Capt. Stokes's company, belonging to Col. Walker's regiment, drawing the attention of a command to the stars and stripes that floated over the enemy, avowed his intention of capturing the colors or die in the attempt. The charge was made, the centre of Walker's regiment, Capt. Stokes's position facing the centre of the Iowa regiment. As the two columns came within a few yards of each other, young Vollmer and a young man by the name of Lynch both made a rush for the colors, but Voll
J. Welby Armstrong (search for this): article 1
le field yesterday. For several miles the trees are and barked by balls, and many horses lie upon the ground, some torn open by shells and others riddled by balls. You can see innumerable stains of blood upon the ground. Where poor, gallant Armstrong was killed there were eleven dead bodies. At the time of his death he had a cap upon his sword waving it, rallying his men. Desperate fighting — justice made out to some of the Vandals. The Avalanche has an interesting letter from a ss bayonet first pierced the breast of the color-bearer, and grasping the flag he waved it over his head in triumph. At this moment he and Lynch were both shot dead, and as Vollmer fell, emulating the ardor of these chivalrous young men, Capt. J. Welby Armstrong stopped forward to capture the colors, when he also fell grasping the flag These colors are now at Gen. Pillow's office. Another. Mr. Farrer, living near Memphis, Tenns., had a son in the fight at Columbus, who was perhaps the
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