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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 20, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Gidron Welles (search for this): article 1
nounces to the navy and to the country its high gratification at the brilliant success of the combined navy and army forces, respectively commanded by Flag Officer S. F. Dupont and Brig. General T. W. Sherman, in the capture of Forts Walker and Beauregard, commanding the entrance to Port Royal harbor, South Carolina. To commemorate this signal victory, it is ordered that a national salute be fired from each Navy-yard at meridian on the day after the receipt of this order. (Signed) Gidron Welles, Secretary Navy. Fremont's removal — affairs at Springfield. The Springfield (Mo.) correspondent of the New York Times gives an amusing account of the state of affairs at Springfield immediately preceding and following the removal of Fremont. The following extracts are worthy the perusal of our readers: The removal. "Late on Saturday night, one of three messengers sent forward by Col. Leonard Sweet, from St. Louis, succeeded including the vigilance of the guards stat
Leonard Sweet (search for this): article 1
-yard at meridian on the day after the receipt of this order. (Signed) Gidron Welles, Secretary Navy. Fremont's removal — affairs at Springfield. The Springfield (Mo.) correspondent of the New York Times gives an amusing account of the state of affairs at Springfield immediately preceding and following the removal of Fremont. The following extracts are worthy the perusal of our readers: The removal. "Late on Saturday night, one of three messengers sent forward by Col. Leonard Sweet, from St. Louis, succeeded including the vigilance of the guards stationed to prevent access to Gen. Fremont's headquarters, and served on the General personally the orders from Washington. Upon this there was, of course, unutterable consternation and commotion in and around headquarters, and it appeared doubtful for several hours what course General Fremont would pursue. Many of his leading personal adherents, chiefly of the Tentonic stripe, were in favor of disregarding the rem
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
er was pitched headforemost, the place is a changed town and a changed post to-day. Permission asked to carry the children of the late Senator Douglas to North Carolina. A gentleman arrived here to-day from North Carolina, for the purpose of obtaining permission to carry to that State the two children of the late Senator North Carolina, for the purpose of obtaining permission to carry to that State the two children of the late Senator Stephen A. Douglas. It appears that these boys are entitled to large estates in North Carolina and Mississippi, which under the recently enacted law of the rebel Confederacy, are in danger of confiscation on account of the non-residence of the children, although they are infants. The relatives of their mother are anxious that thNorth Carolina and Mississippi, which under the recently enacted law of the rebel Confederacy, are in danger of confiscation on account of the non-residence of the children, although they are infants. The relatives of their mother are anxious that they shall be brought South to secure their rights in this property. They are also desirous that Mrs. Douglas shall accompany them if she will consent. The Government has recently concluded not to grant passes to go beyond the lines of the Federal army for such purposes, as it intends to take such action as will render utterly nul
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
amer Bienville, arrived here at noon to-day, bringing official dispatches from the Great Expedition. He is also the bearer of two of the Rebels' "Confederate flags," one Rebel Palmetto flag, and also brings the American flag first planted in South Carolina over Fort Walker. Capt. Steedman reports that the captured forts are magnificent, with covered ways and bomb- proofs. All that our troops had to do was to occupy them. They can be held against any force. Among the most efficient vn at the brilliant success of the combined navy and army forces, respectively commanded by Flag Officer S. F. Dupont and Brig. General T. W. Sherman, in the capture of Forts Walker and Beauregard, commanding the entrance to Port Royal harbor, South Carolina. To commemorate this signal victory, it is ordered that a national salute be fired from each Navy-yard at meridian on the day after the receipt of this order. (Signed) Gidron Welles, Secretary Navy. Fremont's removal — affairs a
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
he gale and under fire, was perfect. The negroes are wild and plundering their masters' houses. The whites have been driving the negroes away by force and shooting them down, but they still come down to the gun-boats. The moment Gen. Drayton took to his horse in the panic of the 7th, his two hundred servants went directly to the Wabash. This is worthy of notice, as putting down the nonsense that slaves were ready to fight for their masters. They surrounded Capt. Ammen in crowds, at Beaufort, one of them calling out, in the joy of his heart, "I didn't think you could do it, massa. " Order of Congratulation to the army and Navy. On the reception of the official dispatches the following order was issued: General Order. This Department announces to the navy and to the country its high gratification at the brilliant success of the combined navy and army forces, respectively commanded by Flag Officer S. F. Dupont and Brig. General T. W. Sherman, in the capture o
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
s assuming command of one of the forts at Port Royal, two of the soldiers opened a door leading to the magazine, when a terrific explosion occurred, instantly killing the two soldiers, and wounding a number of others. It is supposed that the savage rebels, before abandondoning the fort, affixed an infernal machine to the magazine door, which, upon being ignited, ignited the powder and caused the explosion. When the news by the Blenville became generally known among the soldiers at Fortress Monroe and Newport News, the excitement was of the willest character. The soldiers danced and capered about in high glee, and rent the air with wild huzzas at the success of their brethren in arms. Official Accounts--Com. Dupont's dispatches to the Navy Department. Washington, Nov. 13. --Capt. Steedman, of the steamer Bienville, arrived here at noon to-day, bringing official dispatches from the Great Expedition. He is also the bearer of two of the Rebels' "Confederate flags," on
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
uns that would announce the commencement of the bombardment and capture of Springfield by the rebels. These things are only mentioned to serve as a fitting commentary on "the victory" which Gen. Fremont, in his parting address, told the "soldiers of the Mississippi army" they were "just about to win!" Never was there a worse panic in any army than that which raged through the 20,000 men assembled here, from sunrise to sunset yesterday. Not Washington, in the forty-eight hours following Bull Run, was any more a prey to terror, confusion, and the total obliteration of all discipline. This is a fact which will be borne out by the concurrent testimony of every intelligent officer present, and this, perhaps, may have been the "splendid example" to which Major General Fremont refers in his stump speech. At or about 9 o'clock last evening Gen. Hunter arrived in town, and soon after called at Gen. Fremont's late headquarters, where a council of the more prominent Generals had been a
New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
ng which your correspondent does not even venture to surmise. Certain it is only that the excited and feverish sentiment of Springfield instantly subsided. The soldiers, who were passing hurriedly round their camps, at length remembered that tattoo had been sounded, and retired to their tents, (such of them as had any.) Many long and haggard faces gradually but steadily resumed their wonted aspect of circular stupidity, and all our streets were dull, orderly, and quiet as these of a New England village by moonlight. Exit the battle. But never morning opened more peacefully or sweetly — the sun shining with the fever of July on the fields of glittering hoar-frost, the blue jays shrieking in the woods, and most of the panic-stricken soldiers of yesterday looking exceedingly ashamed of themselves. Of the 40,000 men said to be under Price in our immediate neighborhood, we have received definite information only of two foraging parties, one of about 300, and the other of 41
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
e combined navy and army forces, respectively commanded by Flag Officer S. F. Dupont and Brig. General T. W. Sherman, in the capture of Forts Walker and Beauregard, commanding the entrance to Port Royal harbor, South Carolina. To commemorate this signal victory, it is ordered that a national salute be fired from each Navy-yard at meridian on the day after the receipt of this order. (Signed) Gidron Welles, Secretary Navy. Fremont's removal — affairs at Springfield. The Springfield (Mo.) correspondent of the New York Times gives an amusing account of the state of affairs at Springfield immediately preceding and following the removal of Fremont. The following extracts are worthy the perusal of our readers: The removal. "Late on Saturday night, one of three messengers sent forward by Col. Leonard Sweet, from St. Louis, succeeded including the vigilance of the guards stationed to prevent access to Gen. Fremont's headquarters, and served on the General personally
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
d of themselves. Of the 40,000 men said to be under Price in our immediate neighborhood, we have received definite information only of two foraging parties, one of about 300, and the other of 410 exactly, who had come down on separate roads to within fifteen or eighteen miles of this place. We also learn that there are nearly, if not quite, 2,400 rebels about 45 miles from here, and it is said that Price has 20,000 somewhere down near the White River, over which he draws his supplies from Arkansas, the country south of this being an absolute wilderness of fifth hills, producing few eatables save hickory-nuts and black walnuts. The body guard — the running-off Paymaster. Meantime, at an early hour this morning, General Fremont took his leave, his Indian "body guard" riding first, followed by his white "body guard," and the rear being brought up by another Indian "body guard," with a train of uncounted wagons and teams — all being necessary, I suppose, to transport our late co
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