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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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November 14th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
Ran away.--$100 reward. --Ranaway from the Batteries in Manchester, on or about the 3d, September last a Negro Boy, named John call himself John Alvis, the property of Mrs. Roberta Robinson. Said negro is about 18 or of aged, 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high; brown complexion black eye and very sullen looking.--He is supposed to be in the neighborhood of Richmond or at some of the encampments below Richmond be paid for his delivery to the subscriber in the city or any of the adjacent course $50 taken in any other part of the State, or $100 if taken out of the State. Samuel Hastings. Richmond, Nov. 14, 1861. no 20--d6t&ewlt*
Samuel Hastings (search for this): article 1
Ran away.--$100 reward. --Ranaway from the Batteries in Manchester, on or about the 3d, September last a Negro Boy, named John call himself John Alvis, the property of Mrs. Roberta Robinson. Said negro is about 18 or of aged, 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high; brown complexion black eye and very sullen looking.--He is supposed to be in the neighborhood of Richmond or at some of the encampments below Richmond be paid for his delivery to the subscriber in the city or any of the adjacent course $50 taken in any other part of the State, or $100 if taken out of the State. Samuel Hastings. Richmond, Nov. 14, 1861. no 20--d6t&ewlt*
March, 9 AD (search for this): article 1
Ran away.--$100 reward. --Ranaway from the Batteries in Manchester, on or about the 3d, September last a Negro Boy, named John call himself John Alvis, the property of Mrs. Roberta Robinson. Said negro is about 18 or of aged, 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high; brown complexion black eye and very sullen looking.--He is supposed to be in the neighborhood of Richmond or at some of the encampments below Richmond be paid for his delivery to the subscriber in the city or any of the adjacent course $50 taken in any other part of the State, or $100 if taken out of the State. Samuel Hastings. Richmond, Nov. 14, 1861. no 20--d6t&ewlt*
John Alvis (search for this): article 1
Ran away.--$100 reward. --Ranaway from the Batteries in Manchester, on or about the 3d, September last a Negro Boy, named John call himself John Alvis, the property of Mrs. Roberta Robinson. Said negro is about 18 or of aged, 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high; brown complexion black eye and very sullen looking.--He is supposed to be in the neighborhood of Richmond or at some of the encampments below Richmond be paid for his delivery to the subscriber in the city or any of the adjacent course $50 taken in any other part of the State, or $100 if taken out of the State. Samuel Hastings. Richmond, Nov. 14, 1861. no 20--d6t&ewlt*
Roberta Robinson (search for this): article 1
Ran away.--$100 reward. --Ranaway from the Batteries in Manchester, on or about the 3d, September last a Negro Boy, named John call himself John Alvis, the property of Mrs. Roberta Robinson. Said negro is about 18 or of aged, 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high; brown complexion black eye and very sullen looking.--He is supposed to be in the neighborhood of Richmond or at some of the encampments below Richmond be paid for his delivery to the subscriber in the city or any of the adjacent course $50 taken in any other part of the State, or $100 if taken out of the State. Samuel Hastings. Richmond, Nov. 14, 1861. no 20--d6t&ewlt*
Manchester (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): article 1
Ran away.--$100 reward. --Ranaway from the Batteries in Manchester, on or about the 3d, September last a Negro Boy, named John call himself John Alvis, the property of Mrs. Roberta Robinson. Said negro is about 18 or of aged, 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high; brown complexion black eye and very sullen looking.--He is supposed to be in the neighborhood of Richmond or at some of the encampments below Richmond be paid for his delivery to the subscriber in the city or any of the adjacent course $50 taken in any other part of the State, or $100 if taken out of the State. Samuel Hastings. Richmond, Nov. 14, 1861. no 20--d6t&ewlt*
lant, jealous, and fierce. The American people had thrown themselves against it with their whole heart and soul. What must be the surprise of the American public, both in the Federal and Confederate States, to hear that the Lincoln Administration, abandoning the policy and trampling upon the traditions of generation past, has set itself up as a champion of this long denied right of search to the extent of actually exercising it upon a British vessel We went to war with Great Britain in 1812 because of her boarding our vessels in search of seamen claimed to be her subjects, and taking them off by force. In the majority of the seamen she took away were in her subjects, in some few cases they were nebertive American citizens. We declared war, not because of her taking Americans off in these searches, but because of the search itself, followed by the taking off of men of any character or nativity whatever. We declared, as a measure of honor, that every precaution was taken in e
any character or nativity whatever. We declared, as a measure of honor, that every precaution was taken in enlisting our crews, to prevent British seamen from being embraced in them, but having given this guaranty of honor we for bade the searching of our vessels for the purpose of taking away any class of persons whatever. Great Britain persisted in this practice, and war was the consequence.--Other causes conspired to inflame the mutual animosity, such as the paper blockades of Pitt and Napoleon, which are now immolated by Lincoln on our Southern coast; but the leading and moving cause of the war were these searches of American vessels and these violent seizures of men on board. The American continent is now astounded by the intelligence that a Lincoln steamer has boarded a British mail packet on the high seas for the purpose of search and has captured and brought off Southern citizens claimed, we suppose, to be subjects of the Lincoln Government. The American doctrines of se
Americans (search for this): article 1
he traditions of generation past, has set itself up as a champion of this long denied right of search to the extent of actually exercising it upon a British vessel We went to war with Great Britain in 1812 because of her boarding our vessels in search of seamen claimed to be her subjects, and taking them off by force. In the majority of the seamen she took away were in her subjects, in some few cases they were nebertive American citizens. We declared war, not because of her taking Americans off in these searches, but because of the search itself, followed by the taking off of men of any character or nativity whatever. We declared, as a measure of honor, that every precaution was taken in enlisting our crews, to prevent British seamen from being embraced in them, but having given this guaranty of honor we for bade the searching of our vessels for the purpose of taking away any class of persons whatever. Great Britain persisted in this practice, and war was the consequence.--
res of American policy which, of all others, the United States had cherished most carefully and jealously from the foundation of the Government. Until the era of Lincoln, the American Government would as soon have consented to give up the right of calling out its volunteer forces on land, as that of employing its privateers on theand war was the consequence.--Other causes conspired to inflame the mutual animosity, such as the paper blockades of Pitt and Napoleon, which are now immolated by Lincoln on our Southern coast; but the leading and moving cause of the war were these searches of American vessels and these violent seizures of men on board. The Ame search of a neutral vessel for ambassadorial functionaries and papers, was in violation even of the very law which concedes the right of search. The act of Lincoln's commodore was not only a base betrayal of American interests and abnegation of American doctrines on the subject of search; but it was in violation also of the
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