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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
the slumbering volcano on which the Lincoln Government now rests, and the eruption that will destroy, not only the leaders of the Government, but the Government itself will be hastened. Since Gen. McClellan is now Commander-in-Chief it seems peculiarly proper that a strong effort should be made to effect an exchange, for he is already more than half committed to the policy. If his view were not favorable to such a system, the obligations given by our men who were paroled by him at Rich Mountain and Laurel Hill would have been very different from the one which was exacted. Being unfortunately one of those prisoners, this writer subscribed the following obligation; "I promise on honor not to take up arms nor serve in any military capacity against the United States Government until released according to the usages of war." This obligation, taken from those who were surrendered as belligerents is without doubt a complete recognition of us as such; yet it is more than a recognition
McClellan (search for this): article 7
ncoln Government now rests, and the eruption that will destroy, not only the leaders of the Government, but the Government itself will be hastened. Since Gen. McClellan is now Commander-in-Chief it seems peculiarly proper that a strong effort should be made to effect an exchange, for he is already more than half committed to granted the law and morals would hold the obligator guiltless who should violate it in his turn. It is referred to, though merely for the purpose of showing Gen. McClellan's position in this matter. The present time is most favorable for pressing this policy upon the Lincoln Administration, and Gen. McClellan's desire to inGen. McClellan's desire to ingratiate himself with the masses, by gaining the reputation of having obtained the release of their friends now in our hands backs up the application very powerfully. By accomplishing it, our gallant friends now in their hands, and those of us who are paroled and at home, will have the chains removed from our gallant limbs, and o
become a charge upon the community in which they lived, or the Government, falling to supply their wants, would increase the number of growlers. They will receive no wages after their regiments were mustered out of service. Thus it will be readily perceived that their Government is gainer by their detention. The policy of exchanging will never be adopted whilst our Government holds such men in durance and paroles those who are enlisted for the war, or for three years, as was done by Gen. Price at Lexington, Mo.--These men, and such as they, should be held with a tenacious grasp, and not one should be released until a system of exchanging should be adopted. Instead of releasing men, who can at once re-enter the service, let our Government send home those who cannot be compelled to serve immediately. Now, if an exchange takes place, we must receive men who will go at once to their places in our ranks, whilst they must be paid for with men, who will have to be sent home, and who,