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the hill, a Yankee gun-boat appeared at the landing, but too late to do themselves any good of the rebels any damage. Not a pound of freight on the boat belonging to private individuals was interfered with. Hon. Henry M. Rust. The Louisville Courier, of the 23d, says: We are exceedingly pained to hear that Hon. Henry M. Rust, of Greenup county, State Senator from that district, who was engaged in the brilliant achievement of our little army at Gauley, near Piketon, on the 8th inst., fell pierced by seven balls and is supposed to be mortally wounded. His brave and impetuous spirit made him render his person too conspicuous a mark for the enemy. He was rescued by his comrades, who, after carrying him two miles, found he was too seriously injured to be conveyed further, when he was left at a farm- house in the neighborhood. Subsequently he was taken prisoner by the Lincolnites, who placed a guard over the house where he was lying.--We sincerely trust his valuable lif
n of the foe from our entire State is merely a question of time, and of our means fully to arm and equip our loyal citizens. I remain, Colonel, very respectfully, Your obedient servant., Thos. C. Reynolds, Lieut. Governor of Missouri. Headq'rs, first military district, M. S. G., camp Allen, Oct. 28, 1861. Lieutenant Governor T. C. Reynolds: Sir: --I am instructed by the General commanding this brigade, to forward you a detailed account of our movements subsequent to the 12th ult. when we broke camp at Spring Hill, Stoddard county. On the above date, about 10 o'clock A. M., the General, accompanied by five hundred mounted riflemen, started in a direct course toward the Iron Mountain railroad, designing to strike it about forty miles south of Saint Louis at Big River Bridge. In the absence of the General, Colonel Andrew Lowe, of the Third Regiment of Infantry, commanded the remaining forces, which consisted mostly of infantry. He was ordered to make his line of m
An Episode in the Virginia Convention. Shortly after the Convention assembled yesterday, Mr. Chambliss laid before that body a copy of the following resolutions, adopted by a portion of his constituents in Sussex and Greenville counties: 1st. That we cordially approve the views of Gov. Letcher in his communication to the Convention on the 16th inst. and join in his appeal to that body to arrest the extortion practiced by merchants and speculators on the citizens and soldiers. 2d. That we hold the act sequestrating the property of alien enemies to be wise and just, and justice demands the confiscation of the property of domestic enemies. 3d. That merchants and speculators who monopolize such articles of prime necessity as salt, leather, shoe-thread, &c., and sell them, at such exorbitant prices as to be beyond the means of the soldier, the mechanic, or anybody but the very rich, do thereby distress and cripple the resources of the country and render efficient aid
John Roberts, Sr., of Shelbyville, Tenn. died on the 16th inst., at the advanced age of 102 years. He was a soldier in the revolutionary war.
here had three killed and six wounded, and killed six of the enemy and wounded quite a number. We captured, among other things, 50 muskets, forty-five overcoats, and a number of blankets. The prisoners were all liberated on taking the oath not to serve during the war, or until exchanged. During the march of the infantry towards Fredericktown, our scouts brought in two Federal soldiers, captured five miles beyond the town, and reported a large party after them. We reached the place on the 17th, and quietly went into camp to await the return of the General. Early on the morning of the 18th, the camp was started by a quick succession of musket shots beyond the St. Francis Bridge, which crosses a river of the same name a quarter of a mile beyond the town. We soon discovered that it proceeded from our picket, which had been driven in by a large force of cavalry. The enemy sustained a severe loss, as the picket, which was under the command of Captain Holmes, consisted of 30 men, who
e captured, among other things, 50 muskets, forty-five overcoats, and a number of blankets. The prisoners were all liberated on taking the oath not to serve during the war, or until exchanged. During the march of the infantry towards Fredericktown, our scouts brought in two Federal soldiers, captured five miles beyond the town, and reported a large party after them. We reached the place on the 17th, and quietly went into camp to await the return of the General. Early on the morning of the 18th, the camp was started by a quick succession of musket shots beyond the St. Francis Bridge, which crosses a river of the same name a quarter of a mile beyond the town. We soon discovered that it proceeded from our picket, which had been driven in by a large force of cavalry. The enemy sustained a severe loss, as the picket, which was under the command of Captain Holmes, consisted of 30 men, who gave them a volley at the short distance of 60 yards, the Captain of the little band, as the enemy
n, aware of the vital importance of a blow in Virginia, will, ere long, strike treason to the ground there, where, for so many mouths, it has been the most rampant. The impending battle on the right bank of the Potomac will be decisive of the fate of the rebellion, and signalize to the world that the back of treason is broken forever. The Real Blockading fleet. From the Herald, of the 25th inst. we take the following: The fleet of twenty-five old whalers, that sailed on the 20th inst., is the effective blockading squadron of the Atlantic coast. A blockade of such a description did not enter the minds of those who framed the treaty of Paris, but the populations of Charleston Savannah, Mobile, and other rebel seaports will find that it completely answers the purpose of preventing ingress and egress to their respective harbors. In the beginning of the present century, the patriotic fathers of the Republic of the United States presented nearly every one of the practical p
Financial and commercial. --From the Baltimore Sun, of the 23d inst., we take the following: The discount on Western Virginia money is 2½ a 3 per cent., and on Eastern Virginia, North and South Carolina and Georgia, 18 a 20 per cent. The movements of the banks in three of the principal cities of the Union, in which weekly reports are made, as shown by their last statements, and compared with the same period of last year, is as follows: Loans.Specie. New York$137,308,635$41,461,833 Boston62,926,0727,180,001 Philadelphia27,620,7847,086,809 Total227,891,49155,708,643 Last week231,818,44655,444,696 Last year214,197,50528,093,883 Circula'n.Net Deps. New York$3,799,675$111,121,204 Boston6,268,69728,575,450 Philadelphia2,226,42019,491,141 Total Last week Last year
took place near Buckingham on Saturday last, between the Confederates and the Federal invaders. The Federals attempted to land but were driven off. One of our men was slightly wounded by a shell. It is reported that the enemy landed on yesterday at Bennett's Point, at the mouth of Ashapoo river. Four Federal steamers shelled Otto Island, near St. Helena, on Monday, and then landed. They now hold entire possession of St. Helena Sound. A number of lights passed our bar on Monday night, and it is presumed that the Federal fleet were en route South. Perhaps they were a portion or the whole of the "twenty old whalers" referred to in the New York Herald, of the 25th inst. Savannah, Nov. 28.--The papers of this morning state that Fort Pulaski, on yesterday, threw a few shot and shell at the camp of the Federals on Tybee Island, which caused a Bull Run stampede to safer quarters on that island. There are now six Federal vessels inside of the bar, and five outside.
War matters.intelligence from the North. We continue our extracts of Northern news taken from the New York Herald, of the 25th inst., received a day or two ago by the Norfolk Day Book: The New York Herald on President Davis's message. The New York Herald, of the 25th instant, publishes a long editorial severely critic25th instant, publishes a long editorial severely criticising President Davis's last message to the Confederate Congress. The following extracts will give the general drift of the whole article: We published yesterday in extenso, by telegraph from Washington, the message of Jefferson Davis to the rebel Congress, now in session at Richmond. Those of our readers who have perused if the fate of the rebellion, and signalize to the world that the back of treason is broken forever. The Real Blockading fleet. From the Herald, of the 25th inst. we take the following: The fleet of twenty-five old whalers, that sailed on the 20th inst., is the effective blockading squadron of the Atlantic coast. A
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