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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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George W. Cubbage (search for this): article 14
Cavalry, and were captured on Tuesday last near Occoquan, while on a foraging expedition. It seems that the thieves had secured their plunder in wagons, and were making off, when our men attacked them, killing two, wounding one, and capturing the remainder. Among the number are two sergeants and two corporals. The other five prisoners are, a negro belonging to Mr. Davis, of Fairfax county; Edward Johnson, residing near. Dranesville; Wm. H. Williamson, a citizen of Fairfax county; Pat Graham, of Maryland, and Isaac Burrus, of Virginia. There are now 1,483 Federal prisoners in Richmond, not counting seven who were expected last night by the Petersburg train, from North Carolina. A young man named Chandler F. Perry, of the 4th Maine Regiment, who has been officiating as hospital steward at the prisons, died suddenly yesterday of heart disease. Three other deaths occurred yesterday — John M. Lee, of the 1st Maine Regiment, and Geo. W. Cubbage and Martin Mace, of Hardy county, Va.
Martin Mace (search for this): article 14
Cavalry, and were captured on Tuesday last near Occoquan, while on a foraging expedition. It seems that the thieves had secured their plunder in wagons, and were making off, when our men attacked them, killing two, wounding one, and capturing the remainder. Among the number are two sergeants and two corporals. The other five prisoners are, a negro belonging to Mr. Davis, of Fairfax county; Edward Johnson, residing near. Dranesville; Wm. H. Williamson, a citizen of Fairfax county; Pat Graham, of Maryland, and Isaac Burrus, of Virginia. There are now 1,483 Federal prisoners in Richmond, not counting seven who were expected last night by the Petersburg train, from North Carolina. A young man named Chandler F. Perry, of the 4th Maine Regiment, who has been officiating as hospital steward at the prisons, died suddenly yesterday of heart disease. Three other deaths occurred yesterday — John M. Lee, of the 1st Maine Regiment, and Geo. W. Cubbage and Martin Mace, of Hardy county, Va.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 14
Cavalry, and were captured on Tuesday last near Occoquan, while on a foraging expedition. It seems that the thieves had secured their plunder in wagons, and were making off, when our men attacked them, killing two, wounding one, and capturing the remainder. Among the number are two sergeants and two corporals. The other five prisoners are, a negro belonging to Mr. Davis, of Fairfax county; Edward Johnson, residing near. Dranesville; Wm. H. Williamson, a citizen of Fairfax county; Pat Graham, of Maryland, and Isaac Burrus, of Virginia. There are now 1,483 Federal prisoners in Richmond, not counting seven who were expected last night by the Petersburg train, from North Carolina. A young man named Chandler F. Perry, of the 4th Maine Regiment, who has been officiating as hospital steward at the prisons, died suddenly yesterday of heart disease. Three other deaths occurred yesterday — John M. Lee, of the 1st Maine Regiment, and Geo. W. Cubbage and Martin Mace, of Hardy county, Va.
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 14
Cavalry, and were captured on Tuesday last near Occoquan, while on a foraging expedition. It seems that the thieves had secured their plunder in wagons, and were making off, when our men attacked them, killing two, wounding one, and capturing the remainder. Among the number are two sergeants and two corporals. The other five prisoners are, a negro belonging to Mr. Davis, of Fairfax county; Edward Johnson, residing near. Dranesville; Wm. H. Williamson, a citizen of Fairfax county; Pat Graham, of Maryland, and Isaac Burrus, of Virginia. There are now 1,483 Federal prisoners in Richmond, not counting seven who were expected last night by the Petersburg train, from North Carolina. A young man named Chandler F. Perry, of the 4th Maine Regiment, who has been officiating as hospital steward at the prisons, died suddenly yesterday of heart disease. Three other deaths occurred yesterday — John M. Lee, of the 1st Maine Regiment, and Geo. W. Cubbage and Martin Mace, of Hardy county, Va.
Fairfax (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
under in wagons, and were making off, when our men attacked them, killing two, wounding one, and capturing the remainder. Among the number are two sergeants and two corporals. The other five prisoners are, a negro belonging to Mr. Davis, of Fairfax county; Edward Johnson, residing near. Dranesville; Wm. H. Williamson, a citizen of Fairfax county; Pat Graham, of Maryland, and Isaac Burrus, of Virginia. There are now 1,483 Federal prisoners in Richmond, not counting seven who were expected lasFairfax county; Pat Graham, of Maryland, and Isaac Burrus, of Virginia. There are now 1,483 Federal prisoners in Richmond, not counting seven who were expected last night by the Petersburg train, from North Carolina. A young man named Chandler F. Perry, of the 4th Maine Regiment, who has been officiating as hospital steward at the prisons, died suddenly yesterday of heart disease. Three other deaths occurred yesterday — John M. Lee, of the 1st Maine Regiment, and Geo. W. Cubbage and Martin Mace, of Hardy county, Va.
Occoquan River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
Federal prisoners. --The Central train last evening brought thirty-one prisoners from Manassas, in charge of Lieutenant Raymond Fairfax and a guard of seven men. Twenty six of these prisoners belonged to the 3d Pennsylvania Cavalry, and were captured on Tuesday last near Occoquan, while on a foraging expedition. It seems that the thieves had secured their plunder in wagons, and were making off, when our men attacked them, killing two, wounding one, and capturing the remainder. Among the number are two sergeants and two corporals. The other five prisoners are, a negro belonging to Mr. Davis, of Fairfax county; Edward Johnson, residing near. Dranesville; Wm. H. Williamson, a citizen of Fairfax county; Pat Graham, of Maryland, and Isaac Burrus, of Virginia. There are now 1,483 Federal prisoners in Richmond, not counting seven who were expected last night by the Petersburg train, from North Carolina. A young man named Chandler F. Perry, of the 4th Maine Regiment, who has been o
Hardy County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
Cavalry, and were captured on Tuesday last near Occoquan, while on a foraging expedition. It seems that the thieves had secured their plunder in wagons, and were making off, when our men attacked them, killing two, wounding one, and capturing the remainder. Among the number are two sergeants and two corporals. The other five prisoners are, a negro belonging to Mr. Davis, of Fairfax county; Edward Johnson, residing near. Dranesville; Wm. H. Williamson, a citizen of Fairfax county; Pat Graham, of Maryland, and Isaac Burrus, of Virginia. There are now 1,483 Federal prisoners in Richmond, not counting seven who were expected last night by the Petersburg train, from North Carolina. A young man named Chandler F. Perry, of the 4th Maine Regiment, who has been officiating as hospital steward at the prisons, died suddenly yesterday of heart disease. Three other deaths occurred yesterday — John M. Lee, of the 1st Maine Regiment, and Geo. W. Cubbage and Martin Mace, of Hardy county, Va.
Dranesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
en. Twenty six of these prisoners belonged to the 3d Pennsylvania Cavalry, and were captured on Tuesday last near Occoquan, while on a foraging expedition. It seems that the thieves had secured their plunder in wagons, and were making off, when our men attacked them, killing two, wounding one, and capturing the remainder. Among the number are two sergeants and two corporals. The other five prisoners are, a negro belonging to Mr. Davis, of Fairfax county; Edward Johnson, residing near. Dranesville; Wm. H. Williamson, a citizen of Fairfax county; Pat Graham, of Maryland, and Isaac Burrus, of Virginia. There are now 1,483 Federal prisoners in Richmond, not counting seven who were expected last night by the Petersburg train, from North Carolina. A young man named Chandler F. Perry, of the 4th Maine Regiment, who has been officiating as hospital steward at the prisons, died suddenly yesterday of heart disease. Three other deaths occurred yesterday — John M. Lee, of the 1st Maine Reg
From Gen. Floyd's camp. Floyd's retreat from Cotton Hill — its occupation by the Yankees-- prisoners — an advance of the Federals Probable — the condition of Western Virginia, &c. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Lewisburg,Floyd's retreat from Cotton Hill — its occupation by the Yankees-- prisoners — an advance of the Federals Probable — the condition of Western Virginia, &c. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Lewisburg, Va., Nov. 23, 1861. You are doubtless apprised, ere this, of the retreat of Gen. Floyd from Cotton Hill. He came near being surrounded, and lost considerable baggage, including many of his tents. After he had passed beyond the mouth of the Gen. Floyd from Cotton Hill. He came near being surrounded, and lost considerable baggage, including many of his tents. After he had passed beyond the mouth of the not set for him, a report spread among the pursuing Yankees that the rebel cavalry were about to get into their rear. Thereupon they faced to the "right about," and began a precipitate retreat, throwing away their haversacks, knapsacks, and blanketsies in full run from each other at the same instant. I learn that the Yankees have fallen back to Cotton Hill, while Floyd's main body is between Raleigh Court-House and Parg's Ferry. For several days we have had rumors that the enemy wer
back policy? Are the true and loyal citizens of Western Virginia to be entirely and hopelessly handed over to the tender mercies of Ohio and Indiana ruffians? It is idle to think of reconquering Western Virginia with less than 50,000 effective men; and the Government had as well decide at once between sending as that force or abandoning the country altogether! The failure of the campaign in Western Virginia is attributable almost solely to the fact that we have never had one-third the troops actually required. The citizens are greatly discouraged. They feel that they have been neglected, and see no signs of a change for the better, and the consequence will be that when the Yankees get in, thousands who have been active and self sacrificing in behalf of our cause will give up in despair and take the oath of allegiance to the Lincoln Government. Mr. Editor, can you not do something for us, through the medium of your editorial column, before it is too late? A Rebel.
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