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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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November 23rd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 16
From Gen. Floyd's camp. Floyd's retreat from Cotton Hill — its occupation by the Yankees-- prisoners — an advance of the Federals Probable — the condition of Western Virginia, &c. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Lewisburg, Va., Nov. 23, 1861. You are doubtless apprised, ere this, of the retreat of Gen. Floyd from Cotton Hill. He came near being surrounded, and lost considerable baggage, including many of his tents. After he had passed beyond the mouth of the not set for him, a report spread among the pursuing Yankees that the rebel cavalry were about to get into their rear. Thereupon they faced to the "right about," and began a precipitate retreat, throwing away their haversacks, knapsacks, and blankets, to facilitate their flight. Here then was the indecorous anomaly of two hostile armies in full run from each other at the same instant. I learn that the Yankees have fallen back to Cotton Hill, while Floyd's main body is between Raleigh Court-<
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 16
so easy to get them cut. "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" in this case, certain. From the beginning of the war to the present hour they have steadily advanced into Western Virginia; point after point has been abandoned, and county after county given up, and "the cry is still they come!" Is there never to be an end of this falling back policy? Are the true and loyal citizens of Western Virginia to be entirely and hopelessly handed over to the tender mercies of Ohio and Indiana ruffians? It is idle to think of reconquering Western Virginia with less than 50,000 effective men; and the Government had as well decide at once between sending as that force or abandoning the country altogether! The failure of the campaign in Western Virginia is attributable almost solely to the fact that we have never had one-third the troops actually required. The citizens are greatly discouraged. They feel that they have been neglected, and see no signs of a change for the bett
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 16
wenty-four miles west of this town, but this backs confirmation. That they will advance into this county in a short time, and upon this place, should the weather remain open, admits of not a doubt, in my opinion. There is every reason why they should; not one, why they should not. Should they attempt it in force at this time, we have not more than 700, the First and Second regiments of the Wise Legion, west of Lewisburg, to oppose them; at Greenbrier Bridge, three miles east, we have two Tennessee regiments and the 60th Virginia, in all about 1,400 men, that might be moved to the assistance of the Legion, making in all 2,100 men against from 8,000 to 10,000 Yankees. There is every probability, however, that the Tennessesans and 60th Virginia will be ordered away in a few days, leaving only 700 men between the enemy and the Jackson's River depot. Is such a state of things desirable? is it politic? is it not rather suicidal in the highest degree? The Yankees are pressing forward
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
upation by the Yankees-- prisoners — an advance of the Federals Probable — the condition of Western Virginia, &c. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Lewisburg, Va., Nov. 23, 1861. in. From the beginning of the war to the present hour they have steadily advanced into Western Virginia; point after point has been abandoned, and county after county given up, and "the cry is sts there never to be an end of this falling back policy? Are the true and loyal citizens of Western Virginia to be entirely and hopelessly handed over to the tender mercies of Ohio and Indiana ruffians? It is idle to think of reconquering Western Virginia with less than 50,000 effective men; and the Government had as well decide at once between sending as that force or abandoning the country altogether! The failure of the campaign in Western Virginia is attributable almost solely to the fact that we have never had one-third the troops actually required. The citizens are greatly discoura
Cotton Hill, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
From Gen. Floyd's camp. Floyd's retreat from Cotton Hill — its occupation by the Yankees-- prisoners — an advance of the Federals Probable — the condition of Western Virginia, &c. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Lewisburg, Va., Nov. 23, 1861. You are doubtless apprised, ere this, of the retreat of Gen. Floyd from Cotton Hill. He came near being surrounded, and lost considerable baggage, including many of his tents. After he had passed beyond the mouth of the not set for him, a report spread among the pursuing Yankees that the rebel cavalry were about to get into their rear. Thereupon they faced to the "right about," and b. Here then was the indecorous anomaly of two hostile armies in full run from each other at the same instant. I learn that the Yankees have fallen back to Cotton Hill, while Floyd's main body is between Raleigh Court-House and Parg's Ferry. For several days we have had rumors that the enemy were crossing Big Sewell, twenty-f<
Lewisburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
For several days we have had rumors that the enemy were crossing Big Sewell, twenty-four miles west of this town, but this backs confirmation. That they will advance into this county in a short time, and upon this place, should the weather remain open, admits of not a doubt, in my opinion. There is every reason why they should; not one, why they should not. Should they attempt it in force at this time, we have not more than 700, the First and Second regiments of the Wise Legion, west of Lewisburg, to oppose them; at Greenbrier Bridge, three miles east, we have two Tennessee regiments and the 60th Virginia, in all about 1,400 men, that might be moved to the assistance of the Legion, making in all 2,100 men against from 8,000 to 10,000 Yankees. There is every probability, however, that the Tennessesans and 60th Virginia will be ordered away in a few days, leaving only 700 men between the enemy and the Jackson's River depot. Is such a state of things desirable? is it politic? is i
Edward Johnson (search for this): article 17
d, composed of the squads of that and the previous days, in number about three hundred, under the command of Colonel Hansborough. The mud was ankle-deep and cold and we could scarcely find our quarters, which were generally tends, but occasionally unfinished log-huts. Several hundred men had been detailed for weeks in this mountain to build cabins; but they had done comparatively little for our comfort. I understand Gen. H. R. Jackson has gone to Georgia to assume a command there. Col. Johnson will command here Col. Taliaferro will command at Monterey. A bleak and disagreeable winter will we have here, after a hard and unfortunate campaign. But it is sweet to suffer, as well as to die, for one's country — no vive la petral. And yet the country is full of censure or of contemptuous pity, for the army of the Northwest, because, forsooth, it has gained no brilliant victories like those of Manassas, Leesburg, and Springfield. Well, it matters not, so our independence be gained,
Taliaferro (search for this): article 17
and the previous days, in number about three hundred, under the command of Colonel Hansborough. The mud was ankle-deep and cold and we could scarcely find our quarters, which were generally tends, but occasionally unfinished log-huts. Several hundred men had been detailed for weeks in this mountain to build cabins; but they had done comparatively little for our comfort. I understand Gen. H. R. Jackson has gone to Georgia to assume a command there. Col. Johnson will command here Col. Taliaferro will command at Monterey. A bleak and disagreeable winter will we have here, after a hard and unfortunate campaign. But it is sweet to suffer, as well as to die, for one's country — no vive la petral. And yet the country is full of censure or of contemptuous pity, for the army of the Northwest, because, forsooth, it has gained no brilliant victories like those of Manassas, Leesburg, and Springfield. Well, it matters not, so our independence be gained, who gets the praise. I will, if
November 24th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 17
From the Alleghany mountains. withdrawal of troops from camp Bartow — Severe weather — rumors of an approach of the enemy. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Camp Alleghany, Nov. 24, 1861. Day before yesterday our forces at Camp Bartow withdrew eastward, part stopping here on top of the Alleghany mountains, and the rest taking up quarters in Crab Bottom and Monterey. It is snowing; the wind is blowing a hurricane; it is as cold as the North Pole; and of all the dreary and desolate places on earth, this is entitled to the palm. Yet, the boys are in spirits, their loud halloo, jocund laughter, and occasionally the enlivening sound of the fiddle bravely throwing off Dixie to the echo of these hills, break on my ear above the flapping of tents and the whistling of the tempest. Yesterday a report flew threw camp that the enemy were in pursuit of us and within a mile. The troops, though wholly unexpecting an attack, speedily formed in line-of battle
Henry R. Jackson (search for this): article 17
is camp till after dark, in the rain, being one of the rear guard, composed of the squads of that and the previous days, in number about three hundred, under the command of Colonel Hansborough. The mud was ankle-deep and cold and we could scarcely find our quarters, which were generally tends, but occasionally unfinished log-huts. Several hundred men had been detailed for weeks in this mountain to build cabins; but they had done comparatively little for our comfort. I understand Gen. H. R. Jackson has gone to Georgia to assume a command there. Col. Johnson will command here Col. Taliaferro will command at Monterey. A bleak and disagreeable winter will we have here, after a hard and unfortunate campaign. But it is sweet to suffer, as well as to die, for one's country — no vive la petral. And yet the country is full of censure or of contemptuous pity, for the army of the Northwest, because, forsooth, it has gained no brilliant victories like those of Manassas, Leesburg, and Spr
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