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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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T. F. Meagher (search for this): article 8
e people of the Confederate States and those of the U. S. The style is ornate, glowing and eloquent. We predict that it will produce a sensation; take its place among standard literature; and have the effect of banishing from our midst the hurtful off spring of the morbid and prolific press of the North." From the Dispatch. "Messrs. West & Johnston, our enterprising neighbors and publishers, have in press a work on the 'Crisis,' from the pen of T. W. MacMahon, (the excoriate of T. F. Meagher.) We have read portions of the Mss, and we pronounce it beautiful, excellent, and conclusive. We hope that it will obtain the circulation it merits, not only in America, but in Europe." From the Examiner. Concluding a long notice of it, a writer in this Journal says:"It is impossible for us to convey to the reader any correct idea of this splendid essay. To form a correct idea of so genial and complete a production, it must be perused; and its perusal will repay the reader as
United States (United States) (search for this): article 8
it is as fascinating as any novel — a work truly suitable for both sexes; for the student and the people. In amplitude of illustration, it is rich, classical, and decant; and its logic is invincible. The following are commendations by gentlemen who read portions of the manuscript: From the Richmond Whig. "It discusses with rare ability and learning the institution of a avery in all of its aspects, as well as the social and political distinctions between the people of the Confederate States and those of the U. S. The style is ornate, glowing and eloquent. We predict that it will produce a sensation; take its place among standard literature; and have the effect of banishing from our midst the hurtful off spring of the morbid and prolific press of the North." From the Dispatch. "Messrs. West & Johnston, our enterprising neighbors and publishers, have in press a work on the 'Crisis,' from the pen of T. W. MacMahon, (the excoriate of T. F. Meagher.) We have read por
William Hammond (search for this): article 9
A false Plea --A darkey named Theodore, slave of Wm. Hammond, was examined yesterday on a charge of stealing a pair of shoes. He did not deny the fact, but plead in extenuation that he committed the theft to evade the horrors of starvation. As there was nothing in his appearance to indicate that he was a starved nigger, the Recorder sent him down for punishment.
P. S. Clasefer (search for this): article 9
Col. P. S. Clasefer of the 1st Arkansas
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