hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Johnston 15 1 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Scott 9 7 Browse Search
A. G. Brown 9 3 Browse Search
William B. Willis 8 0 Browse Search
William H. Parvin 8 0 Browse Search
James A. Duncan 8 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 85 total hits in 34 results.

1 2 3 4
Mr. Russell's letters to the London times. "Our Own" Criticises Mr. Seward and his Lake and Sea-coast defence circular — the Politician's Anxiety for a War with England, &c. [from the special Correspondence of the London Times.] Washington, Oct. 19. --In my last letter, in the hurry of closing the envelope, a copy of Mr. Seward's circular and some remarks upon it were omitted; but the omission is of little consequence, as the mail must have taken over the document and the t produced by it in New York and other cities of the United States. The immediate impression in every one's mind was, "Mr. Seward is aware of some action on the part of England, which must result in war" "The Secretary is bent on doing something whise reflections from the words of many people I met last week. The whole American people will, I doubt not, sustain Mr. Seward's tone and position, and certainly the dispatch to which he had to reply was not a very remarkable one, not quite worth
Ministers (search for this): article 5
ond" without knowing anything of the country, except what he could learn from ill-disposed natives and his own eyes as he advanced, for the engineers could do little to assist him; and their efforts to reconnoitre on the Thursday before Bull's Run served only to show they were dangerous and futile.--Gen. McClellan left his quarters in Washington on Friday, and ... gave rise to many of the queer eccentricities of expression called rumors. It must be pleasant to get away sometimes from Cabinet Ministers and statesmen, though, truth to tell, the General is not much concerned about keeping them waiting, for as yet he feels his legs very strong under him. He is standing on the supports of all the United States, but one step may make him know his feet are of clay — that soft end yielding stuff which is only to be hardened in the fire of victorious battle. His quarters are in a pleasant house at the corner of a square — not unlike that of Gordon and Easton. By day the doors and wind
October 20th (search for this): article 5
of loan in their vaults, on which they have been drawing their interest since the date of the first instalment. The Treasury notes are now regularly in circulation, and are rather liked than other wise, and, as General Scott pointed out, they are found to be convenient by the soldiers, who were formerly paid in gold exclusively, and had difficulty in transmitting their pay to their friends at home, as there is no system of money orders known to the post-offices of this country. October 20th.--Gen. McClellan--in some perplexity, probably in reference to the course to be adopted towards such an elastic enemy, who gives way before pressure only to spring out when it is removed, or to spread out into some new quarter — ordered a reconnaissance yesterday morning in the direction of Fairfax Court-House and Flint Hill, and the creek called Difficult. As the good Virginians never made any map of their country of value for military purposes — or, in other words, of accuracy or m
October 19th (search for this): article 5
Mr. Russell's letters to the London times. "Our Own" Criticises Mr. Seward and his Lake and Sea-coast defence circular — the Politician's Anxiety for a War with England, &c. [from the special Correspondence of the London Times.] Washington, Oct. 19. --In my last letter, in the hurry of closing the envelope, a copy of Mr. Seward's circular and some remarks upon it were omitted; but the omission is of little consequence, as the mail must have taken over the document and the news of the effect produced by it in New York and other cities of the United States. The immediate impression in every one's mind was, "Mr. Seward is aware of some action on the part of England, which must result in war" "The Secretary is bent on doing something which will lead to a war with England" I infer these reflections from the words of many people I met last week. The whole American people will, I doubt not, sustain Mr. Seward's tone and position, and certainly the dispatch to whic
1 2 3 4