hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Johnston 15 1 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Scott 9 7 Browse Search
A. G. Brown 9 3 Browse Search
William B. Willis 8 0 Browse Search
William H. Parvin 8 0 Browse Search
James A. Duncan 8 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 85 total hits in 34 results.

1 2 3 4
ntly than the General is by such men as Brigadier General Vanvilet, or Colonel Hunson, notwithstanding the absence of a good deal of stiffness which marks the approach to some headquarters, as General found when he and his brother Commissioner sought in vain to obtain access to Marshal Pelissier in the Crimea. the General, a short time ago an employee on the General Illinois Railway, but still with so much of the old spirit in him that he studied closely all the movements of that short Italian campaign, of which he is not doomed to give a counter part in this part of the world, is a nocturne, and at the close of long laborious days, works hard and fast late into the night, till sleep pursues and overtakes him, when he surrenders readily, for he has one of those natures which need a fair share of rest, capable though they be of great exertion without it on occasion. He works hard, too, in the saddle; and when the business of the morning has been dispatched, off he goes, attended
tates, or they cannot hold their own against the bold and enterprising Confederates. The money is flowing now to the extent of some $1,000,000 a day or more — that is, the notes are; for Mr. Chase, to the immense delight of the New York bankers, has left several millions of loan in their vaults, on which they have been drawing their interest since the date of the first instalment. The Treasury notes are now regularly in circulation, and are rather liked than other wise, and, as General Scott pointed out, they are found to be convenient by the soldiers, who were formerly paid in gold exclusively, and had difficulty in transmitting their pay to their friends at home, as there is no system of money orders known to the post-offices of this country. October 20th.--Gen. McClellan--in some perplexity, probably in reference to the course to be adopted towards such an elastic enemy, who gives way before pressure only to spring out when it is removed, or to spread out into some n
deed. Matters in Missouri are no better. What would be thought in London if an enemy's battery were playing on the shipping below Blackwall? In Kentucky the Federalists do not appear to have gained much, if anything, and the Union party there confess they must have the aid of troops from the other States, or they cannot hold their own against the bold and enterprising Confederates. The money is flowing now to the extent of some $1,000,000 a day or more — that is, the notes are; for Mr. Chase, to the immense delight of the New York bankers, has left several millions of loan in their vaults, on which they have been drawing their interest since the date of the first instalment. The Treasury notes are now regularly in circulation, and are rather liked than other wise, and, as General Scott pointed out, they are found to be convenient by the soldiers, who were formerly paid in gold exclusively, and had difficulty in transmitting their pay to their friends at home, as there is
of papers and journals, and torn envelopes, and the clacking tongue of the telegraph instrument resounds through the building. The General is generally up stairs, and sundry gentle gerbert the entrance to his presence, nor is he destitute of the art of making himself invisible when he pleases. His staff are excellent men, I am told, so far as my personal experience goes, nor could any commander be served more efficiently than the General is by such men as Brigadier General Vanvilet, or Colonel Hunson, notwithstanding the absence of a good deal of stiffness which marks the approach to some headquarters, as General found when he and his brother Commissioner sought in vain to obtain access to Marshal Pelissier in the Crimea. the General, a short time ago an employee on the General Illinois Railway, but still with so much of the old spirit in him that he studied closely all the movements of that short Italian campaign, of which he is not doomed to give a counter part in this part of
s. Here he is natural, but vigilant — candid, but prudent, tobacco ruminant, or fumigant, full of life, and yet contemplative — of a temper, indeed, which seems to take some of its color from that of the accidents of its surrounding in time and place. Extraordinary acts are ascribed to him of which he knows nothing. He is the "Haroun Arachnoid" of the journalist. At one time, attired as a vivandieres, he is testing the quality of lager beer; again, as a simple volunteer he is visiting the Commissariat stores and making practical experiments on bread and meat. Anon, he is encountered as a vidette, or starts out of a wood with embrowned face as a contraband, and before the week is over he has done everything except the thing he has been really engaged in Oh, "Young Napoleon," what a dreadful hundred days are in store for you. One can fancy even row the soldier sighing for the angulus iste in the palatial building devoted to the labors of Central Illinois officials at Chicago
Christian Knight (search for this): article 5
preach, the sergeants pray, and the battalions march, singing sternly-- "Old John Brown lies a mouldering in his grave, But his soul is marching on; Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, "Old John Brown lies a mouldering in his grave, But his soul is marching on." No army was ever so well provided, in quantity at all events with chaplains, and in some men's minds the war for the Union is a crusade for all that is good and holy in the world. The gulf that separated Christian Knight from Saracen Emir was not wider than that which divides the Northern volunteer from the Southern chivalry. The contest over, new political relations may be established, but France and England will not be more distinct. There seems to be no apprehensions that this great mass of armed men cannot be disposed of by a few circulars. They are an immense power in the States and of the State, and they can determine issues not only with their votes, but with their bayonets. The regular a
sance yesterday morning in the direction of Fairfax Court-House and Flint Hill, and the creek called Difficult. As the good Virginians never made any map of their country of value for military purposes — or, in other words, of accuracy or minuteness of detail, it was essential to procure an idea of this part of the theatre of operations, and the topographical engineers who have been at work laying down authentic plans of hill, dale, ravine, and by-path, were in requisition once more Gen. McDowell had no such advantages. He was shoved "on to Richmond" without knowing anything of the country, except what he could learn from ill-disposed natives and his own eyes as he advanced, for the engineers could do little to assist him; and their efforts to reconnoitre on the Thursday before Bull's Run served only to show they were dangerous and futile.--Gen. McClellan left his quarters in Washington on Friday, and ... gave rise to many of the queer eccentricities of expression called rumors
William Grant (search for this): article 5
that the cases selected for remonstrance were far from being the strongest that could have been found. Every word that comes from Great Britain, every act that is done by her, is closely — nay, unjustly — construed by Americans. She may not look over the hedge, while France can steal a horse if she please. The suspicious jealous, shrewish young lady detects foul play in every movement of her mother-in-law, and will "brave none of that." I actually heard an officer find fault with Lieut Grant, of Her Majesty's ship Steady, because he was not quite pleased with the Captain of the United States ship Vandalia, off Charleston, for firing a round shot across his bows to bring him to. This one reads continually of the good faith of France in her neutrality and of the perfidy of England. When the French officers in the Crimean snubbed Gen. McClellan and his brother commissioners, not a word was said of it aloud, nor was there, on the other hand the least expression of satisfaction a
Old John Brown (search for this): article 5
In the regiments in camp there are prayer meetings, and preaching, and revivals, and Young Men's Christian Associations; the Colonels give benediction, the Majors preach, the sergeants pray, and the battalions march, singing sternly-- "Old John Brown lies a mouldering in his grave, But his soul is marching on; Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, "Old John Brown lies a mouldering in his grave, But his soul is marching on." No army was ever so well provided, in quantity aOld John Brown lies a mouldering in his grave, But his soul is marching on." No army was ever so well provided, in quantity at all events with chaplains, and in some men's minds the war for the Union is a crusade for all that is good and holy in the world. The gulf that separated Christian Knight from Saracen Emir was not wider than that which divides the Northern volunteer from the Southern chivalry. The contest over, new political relations may be established, but France and England will not be more distinct. There seems to be no apprehensions that this great mass of armed men cannot be disposed of by a few circu
re covered with a litter of papers and journals, and torn envelopes, and the clacking tongue of the telegraph instrument resounds through the building. The General is generally up stairs, and sundry gentle gerbert the entrance to his presence, nor is he destitute of the art of making himself invisible when he pleases. His staff are excellent men, I am told, so far as my personal experience goes, nor could any commander be served more efficiently than the General is by such men as Brigadier General Vanvilet, or Colonel Hunson, notwithstanding the absence of a good deal of stiffness which marks the approach to some headquarters, as General found when he and his brother Commissioner sought in vain to obtain access to Marshal Pelissier in the Crimea. the General, a short time ago an employee on the General Illinois Railway, but still with so much of the old spirit in him that he studied closely all the movements of that short Italian campaign, of which he is not doomed to give a cou
1 2 3 4