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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 7
How the Yankees Treat Cuff. --We learn that the Yankees are working the negroes they have stolen in South Carolina like dray horses. All day they are at work on entrenchments and picking out cotton, and at night they are ironed, to keep them from escaping to their masters. We advise Mrs. Stowe to go to South Carolina and get the materials for another book. Her relations and friends can furnish her with the richest sort of materials. How the Yankees Treat Cuff. --We learn that the Yankees are working the negroes they have stolen in South Carolina like dray horses. All day they are at work on entrenchments and picking out cotton, and at night they are ironed, to keep them from escaping to their masters. We advise Mrs. Stowe to go to South Carolina and get the materials for another book. Her relations and friends can furnish her with the richest sort of materials.
How the Yankees Treat Cuff. --We learn that the Yankees are working the negroes they have stolen in South Carolina like dray horses. All day they are at work on entrenchments and picking out cotton, and at night they are ironed, to keep them from escaping to their masters. We advise Mrs. Stowe to go to South Carolina and get the materials for another book. Her relations and friends can furnish her with the richest sort of materials.